TT aero position - numb nut$

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
Done my first time trial (25 miles) on a normal road bike and found my clip-on aero bars very uncomfortable to the point where I did about 22 miles using the drops instead.

I've just ordered a new TT saddle (Specialized tritip) but was pondering about the seatpost. I've heard that some Tri people are using Thomson layback posts but having them pointing forward instead to effectively steepen the seattube angle.

Anyone tried this? I've checked on the Thomson website and they say that it is fine to do this with their layback posts.

Any other tips to get comfortable in the aero position?

(I have no plans (or cash) to buy a TT bike)
 

Will1985

Über Member
Location
South Norfolk
I use a Thomson layback. No problems at all pointing forward. Being short, it doesn't have much of a benefit as I'm keeping UCI legal (tip of saddle 5cm behind BB).
 

montage

God Almighty
Location
Bethlehem
Try moving the pads back if this is at all possible. Often the top tube on road bikes is longer than that on TT bikes which means if the clip on bars have the pads on the handlebars then you will find you are stretching/leaning forward too much.
 
OP
e-rider

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
Will1985 said:
I use a Thomson layback. No problems at all pointing forward. Being short, it doesn't have much of a benefit as I'm keeping UCI legal (tip of saddle 5cm behind BB).
Does that imply that most TT bikes are not race legal?

I'm quite tall at 6'2" and I found that I need the saddle further forward when using the aero bars. I'm guessing that if I used a thomson layback I would break that UCI rule, but perhaps not; never really noticed where the tip is located relative to the BB. Is it a problem to break UCI rules - I'm just having a bit of TT fun.
 
OP
e-rider

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
montage said:
Try moving the pads back if this is at all possible. Often the top tube on road bikes is longer than that on TT bikes which means if the clip on bars have the pads on the handlebars then you will find you are stretching/leaning forward too much.
Yeah, it's quite a reach and there is no adjustment to move the pads back so I was going to move the saddle forward instead - this would also make a more racey position.

I'll probably not do more than ten 10 and 25 mile TTs this year.
 

redddraggon

Blondie
Location
North Wales
tundragumski said:
Does that imply that most TT bikes are not race legal?

I'm quite tall at 6'2" and I found that I need the saddle further forward when using the aero bars. I'm guessing that if I used a thomson layback I would break that UCI rule, but perhaps not; never really noticed where the tip is located relative to the BB. Is it a problem to break UCI rules - I'm just having a bit of TT fun.
YOu don't need to be UCI legal for CTT events.
 

Will1985

Über Member
Location
South Norfolk
No it doesn't matter unless you enter the BTTC - some CTT open organisers might raise an eyebrow if it looks stupidly far forward. Find a position where you feel comfortable.
 

palinurus

Legendary Member
Location
Watford
The new saddle should help- I had trouble with distances over 10 miles until I started using a saddle with a long padded nose.

Also- if your road bike was sized with road riding in mind it may be a little too stretched out for time trialling, as others have mentioned you may be able to do something with the seatpost and/or stem.
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Maybe get a pic from side on if you can and then post here, or compare the ankle to hip, hip to shoulder, shoulder to elbow angles yourself and try get them all about 90 degree's (with some individual variance of course) with your back flat.

Surfing the saddle nose, is uncomfortable, I started doing it all the time since Will suggested sitting further forward to me, and after a while, it gets much better.

Riding on the tri bars, is something you need to get used to, back ache, neck ache etc etc, for a while but it will ease when you fine tune position and ride on them a lot. I commute riding on mine. Must look dumb riding in traffic on them but at least when I actually do some TT's ill be conditioned to riding on them :smile:


Profile also make a seat post called the fast forward (or fast forward carbon) which increases the seat tube angle. Looks ugly as sh*t but supposedly gets the job done. Its same idea as the seat post you mentioned pretty much. Pay your money and all that.



About it being UCI legal, i dont have any knowledge on this, but I did read that some Tri bikes have such steep seat tube angles they are not legal in some TT's, or very close to being non-legal (as in you need to be extremely careful in seat adjustment to get it far enough behind the BB). It would pay to check up on this if ever buying a Tri/TT specific bike. I dont know how true it is, just something I read along the way.
 

hiltz

New Member
well some aero clip ons wont work very well in your road position and ultimately, make SFA differnce if your not in a position that is going to allow you to use them correctly.

simply slapping a set of aero bars on in a road position is pointless, unless they are the shorty type (profile draft legal are a good set, as are vision mini clip ons). But even the shorty type make very little difference, but they do allow you to get a little more comfy and not so 'stretched' out...

Just changing a saddle, the angle etc isn't really the route of the problem... Your position might very well be though.


Using a fast forward type thing is also kinda pointless, Road bikes were not made to be good TT bikes for a reason............ Save your money and get a cheapish TT bike when you can, it will make all the difference in the long run!
 

Will1985

Über Member
Location
South Norfolk
For a second ever post this is quite inflammatory (although I know you're on TTF) - the point about testing is that you don't need all the gear from the outset and you can make additions as and when you feel it is necessary or have achieved a target.

As for needing a TT specific frame, what about Andy Wilkinson? He rides a hybrid frame and is one of the fastest BAR testers in the country.

The fast guys may notice a difference in handling/performance, but I'm sceptical as to whether a 26+ minute rider will.
 

hiltz

New Member
Well I just think a little along the lines of just riding what you've got if it works and is comfortable. I too ride a road frame for TT's, Triathlon and whatever I feel the need to race in... There are always exceptions to every rule, but in general saving a bit of coin and getting a TT bike later on down the track is probably the better way to go IMO.

The fastest guys will ALWAYS go fast no matter what bikes they're on.

I know it was an out there post, but I cant see the point of attaching Aero Bars for negligible gain. As long as your riding week in week out and improving does all the gear really matter?

Keep on putting in the miles and worry about the gear later on I think....
 

montage

God Almighty
Location
Bethlehem
Aero bars make a huge difference...
...but most people are too stretched out on them true, if you can buy a pair where the pads can be extended behind the handlebars this would be optimum
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Upon adding my tri bars (to a fuji track bike) I could put out about 2-3mph more for the same perceived effort.

Following some advice on bike setup from Will(1958) and Bill_Gates I fine tuned my possition to avoid being to stretched out and again gained some small speed gains and a lot of comfort gains.

I would personally consider clip on bars and a few commutes to test the possition and some tinkering with your possition a worthwhile process. Unfortunatelly for me, I've not had the oppertunity to test my setup in a race :sad: (Hit by cars twice, and a running injury)
 
OP
e-rider

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
hiltz said:
Well I just think a little along the lines of just riding what you've got if it works and is comfortable. I too ride a road frame for TT's, Triathlon and whatever I feel the need to race in... There are always exceptions to every rule, but in general saving a bit of coin and getting a TT bike later on down the track is probably the better way to go IMO.

The fastest guys will ALWAYS go fast no matter what bikes they're on.

I know it was an out there post, but I cant see the point of attaching Aero Bars for negligible gain. As long as your riding week in week out and improving does all the gear really matter?

Keep on putting in the miles and worry about the gear later on I think....
You appear to contradict yourself with the advice. As for saving the money to buy a TT bike. Saving less than £100 isn't going to get me anywhere near a TT bike, and a TT bike would just be a waste of money for the number of TTs I do in a year. I also disagree that TT bars on a road bike is a waste of time.
 
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