Tubeless pumps and sealant injectors

livpoksoc

Veteran
Location
Basingstoke
I'm awaiting delivery of my first tubeless rims, I have the tyres and sealant here already. The questions I have are

1. Should I invest in a tubeless pump that charges up to release air in one hit, and

2. Do I need a sealant injector, and if so are they all the same size in terms of valve compatibility?

Thanks
 

figbat

Slippery scientist
My first go at tubeless was done with a track pump. Furious pumping to seat the beads, then deflate, ease off a portion of the bead, pour sealant in, then more furious pumping. It was only partially successful so I reverted to seating the tyres with a CO2 inflator, which worked first time every time. Still no injector though. I have subsequently bought a reservoir-type pump - you can do without but it is just easier and saves on CO2 refills/emissions.
 

Jody

Guru
1. Should I invest in a tubeless pump that charges up to release air in one hit
Depends on rim/tyre combo. You might not need one.

2. Do I need a sealant injector, and if so are they all the same size in terms of valve compatibility?
A 50ml syringe works well and although a little too big to push inside the valve, it sits flush and only occasionally gives a little dribble which is easily wiped up.
 

chriswoody

Legendary Member
Location
Northern Germany
Do you already have a track pump? If not then buying one with an air tank is a good move.

If like me, you already have a track pump then you can buy separate air tanks, I bought the Schwalbe Air Booster and it works a charm. Some folk seem able to get by without using a compresser of any sort, but there's no real way of knowing, I'd just invest in one myself.

Sealant injectors all fit Presta valves, which you need for tubeless. I find using an injector the least messy way of keeping your tires topped up and also the best way to initially set up.

Don't forget, you'll also need tubeless rim tape and tubeless valves if you already haven't bought them.
 
OP
livpoksoc

livpoksoc

Veteran
Location
Basingstoke
Do you already have a track pump? If not then buying one with an air tank is a good move.

If like me, you already have a track pump then you can buy separate air tanks, I bought the Schwalbe Air Booster and it works a charm. Some folk seem able to get by without using a compresser of any sort, but there's no real way of knowing, I'd just invest in one myself.

Sealant injectors all fit Presta valves, which you need for tubeless. I find using an injector the least messy way of keeping your tires topped up and also the best way to initially set up.

Don't forget, you'll also need tubeless rim tape and tubeless valves if you already haven't bought them.
Annoyingly I have two track pumps as the one I bought 10 years ago omly fits Presta. I'm not against buying another with a tank or just a tank if they're cheaper.
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
Seat the bead first, then remove the vavle core, inject the sealant then reinflate.

The other method can lead to sealant everywhere
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
or just a tank if they're cheaper.
About £50 quid.

I used a track pump the first few times, but found the separate blaster tank I bought much better.

However, my venerable Halfords track pump would only punch about 80psi into the tank, so I had to buy a new track pump to get 100psi+, which is what the blaster needs to work well.

I don't bother with syringes.

Once you are up and running, topping up is easier because you only need to release one bead of the tyre to do it.

Resealing one bead is much easier than sealing both.

Lean the wheel at an angle against a wall with the sealed bead facing the wall.

Push the centre of the wheel away from you, apply compressed air however you do it, and the second bead should seal fairly easily.
 

Jody

Guru
I don't bother with syringes.

Once you are up and running, topping up is easier because you only need to release one bead of the tyre to do it.

Resealing one bead is much easier than sealing both.
You don't need to pop either bead. Just let the air out, remove the valve core, top up and re-inflate.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
You don't need to pop either bead. Just let the air out, remove the valve core, top up and re-inflate.
OK, I will rephrase.

I don't bother with through the valve stem top ups.

My 2.4" balloon tyres need lots of sealant, so pouring in via an open bead is much easier.

Cracking a bead also lets you see how much liquid sealant is still there.

That, and I paid fifty quid for the blaster which makes me determined to use it at least once a year.
 

Mark pallister

Senior Member
I'm awaiting delivery of my first tubeless rims, I have the tyres and sealant here already. The questions I have are

1. Should I invest in a tubeless pump that charges up to release air in one hit, and

2. Do I need a sealant injector, and if so are they all the same size in terms of valve compatibility?

Thanks
Just get some cheap syringes of eBay
the small one fit straight into the valve
 

MrGrumpy

Huge Member
Location
Fly Fifer
I'm lazy. That would mean 16 refills :laugh:
And small syringes can block with sealant! I’ve never managed to get my tyres up just using a tack pump. Always need a big dump of air to seat the bead. I use a fire extinguisher modified obviously to do that job !
 
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