Tubeless

Glasgow44

Senior Member
Hi there

I’m thinking of buying this bike:

https://www.dalescycles.com/bikes/road-bikes/giant-tcr-advanced-1-pro-compact-2019-road-bike-charcoal

I had a Giant TCR on hire on holiday last year and was really impressed. This bike is set up for tubeless tyres and the bike shop have recommended this as its the way forward (I do have the option of putting tubes in if I want to and it is recommended that I carry a tube/tubes with me as a failsafe anyway). The idea of tubeless when explained to me does appeal.

What are your thoughts on tubeless?

Thanks in advance for your help.

J
 
A few comments on this thread for you. I'm still not tempted to try it, but many on here love them.

https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/ive-just-gone-road-tubeless-a-lot-of-ups-and-downs-but-is-it-a-steep-learning-curve.247362/
 

Milkfloat

Veteran
Location
Midlands
There are a hundred threads on tubeless so it would be worth a good search to see what people think. Some love it (myself included), others hate the initial effort/costs. Personally I have given up trying to defend tubeless against people that judge it without trying it extensively. Cyclist's are traditionalists in the main.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Just swapped my sons mtb back to tubes. Got fed up of having to reinflate randomly soft tyres (not due to punctures) and having to fight with gummed up valves to do this. It was a messy job but havent had to touch his tyres with a pump since.
Have considered tubeless for the commute bike in the past but TBH it is so quick and easy to swap a tube by the roadside that i can't be bothered. The potential mess if i had a tubeless failure and had to fit an emergency tube at the roadside would be a disaster! This is also another point. If you run tubeless you still have to carry all the tube repair items anyway....
 
Just swapped my sons mtb back to tubes. Got fed up of having to reinflate randomly soft tyres (not due to punctures) and having to fight with gummed up valves to do this. It was a messy job but havent had to touch his tyres with a pump since.
Have considered tubeless for the commute bike in the past but TBH it is so quick and easy to swap a tube by the roadside that i can't be bothered. The potential mess if i had a tubeless failure and had to fit an emergency tube at the roadside would be a disaster! This is also another point. If you run tubeless you still have to carry all the tube repair items anyway....
This is my feelings on it too. I shouldn't tempt the bleeding fairy, but it's nearly 2 years since I had a visit anyway.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
The idea of tubeless when explained to me does appeal.
I'm not sure which bit of tubeless tyres are appealing?
Replacing worn tyres = gooey mess.
Swapping tyres Fr-Rr to even wear = gooey mess.
Fitting an alternative set of tyres for a specific event or activity = gooey mess.
Fitting an innertube in the event of a tubeless failure = Can you guess?

Not for me thanks.
 

wonderloaf

Über Member
Location
Hampshire
A few things that appeal to me about tubeless:

No more puncture repairs at the side of the road (hole size dependant that is). If your sidewall or main tread gets seriously slashed then a tube or sealant ain't gonna save you anyway! For this reason I also carry a couple of spare tubes and self adhesive repair patches.
Extra comfort due to lower tyre pressure. I'm riding on 50 psi at the moment.
No more snakebite punctures (I've been it bit prone to these in the past).
If you get a puncture while hurtling down a hill at least the tubeless sealant will try to seal the hole and hopefully let you down slowly. With a tube it could be bang! and the air (and yourself) are gone.

Setting them up is more hassle, messy and expensive than fitting a tube but guess you need to decide if the pro's outweigh the con's.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
it may be a hassle fixing a puncture to commuters time wise
Not really, but then I am practised in the 'art' and don't cut it too close timewise.
 

ericmark

Regular
Location
North Wales
Whole reason I got rid of tubeless tyres or tubs as they were called is so hard to repair puncture. I want proper rims and a tube not stick on tyres.
 
Whole reason I got rid of tubeless tyres or tubs as they were called is so hard to repair puncture. I want proper rims and a tube not stick on tyres.
Tubeless and tubs are not the same.

You may well have had tubs, but tubeless is not a stick on tyre, it's an ordinary tyre mounted without a tube.
 

ericmark

Regular
Location
North Wales
So I assume they need a special rim? Or is it what I called the green tyre which has no air pumped into it, John Boyd Dunlop will be turning in his grave!
 
So I assume they need a special rim? Or is it what I called the green tyre which has no air pumped into it, John Boyd Dunlop will be turning in his grave!
The rim will tend to have a ledge for the bead to seal on, aided by sealant.

A car tyre works the same way, although sealant is rarely used.
 

Milzy

Veteran
Love mine. They fly along & grip better. Roll well over rough stuff instead of skipping off the bumpy road like the tubed 110 psi people.
 
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