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watching the grass grow

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by Abitrary, 7 Jan 2008.

  1. Abitrary

    Abitrary New Member

    Isn't is strange how you have to mow the lawn every six hours during the summer... then suddenly you just don't?

    If you look at it scientically, the factors affecting its growth i.e. sunlight, warmth and moisture shouldn't slow it down that much in winter when:

    -we've still got lots of rain
    -we've now got global warming
    -surely it should grow pro-rata during the sunny spells.

    I conclude therefore that putting the clocks forward at the end of British Summertime affects the grasseses' biorhythmic clock.
     
  2. gracias senor. (But I haven't Senor gracias!)
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  3. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    York, UK
    Er yes. Lots of nature is affected by day length, rather than actual weather. Which is why sometimes Ptarmigan and Hares and Stoats end up with white coats on snowless hillsides... So BST has nothing to do with it, being a human construct, but changing day length does...
     
  4. Abitrary

    Abitrary New Member

    What about the time people spend watching it grow though? BST will affect that, and it's been proved in quantum mechanics that intervention through watching can affect stuff at a molecular level.
     
  5. graham56

    graham56 Veteran

    White is soooo passe this year Arch. :evil:
     
  6. Pete

    Pete Guest

    Nobel Prize for Abitrary!
     
  7. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    Quantum mechanical effects on grass. Could be an IgNoble.
     
  8. Abitrary

    Abitrary New Member

    Whichever way you look at it, the grass is still one hour shorter during winter.
     
  9. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    My grass has grown enough to need a cut but it's not going to get one yet. I think it's grown more than in previous winters.
     
  10. Rhythm Thief has been smoking his - using GMT:tongue:
     
  11. domtyler

    domtyler Über Member

    You can do lots of little creatures a big favour by leaving your grass long over the winter period. You will be rewarded come spring with a much better population of insects that feed on nasties like midges and greenfly.
     
  12. Abitrary

    Abitrary New Member

    It becomes a bloodbath in the spring with all the frogs in there though when you get the hover out
     
  13. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    Actually to be fair to your post on BST, I've had cats who used to turn up to eat at more or less the same time everyday and when the clocks change they are an hour out but then seem to get used to it quickly after a few days.

    BST is just a transformation ultimately though, doesn't mean much.
     
  14. Abitrary

    Abitrary New Member

    But like I was saying, the 'observer effect' must affect it a bit.

    If it can affect other stuff, why not grass?
     
  15. marinyork

    marinyork Resting in suspended Animation

    Location:
    Logopolis
    Well if you're interested in coordinate changes and transformations perhaps you should take up vector calculus as a hobby :wacko:.

    Perhaps grass mysteriously changes flavours. Perhaps grass is diffracted in a double slit phenomenon as it goes through a lawnmower. Perhaps it is renormalized when it gets composted.

    Joking aside, as we've said elsewhere quantum mechanical effects are observed but like with the pendulum it's a mindbogglingly small affect. Bits of grass have dimensions in mm, the scales we're talking about where quantum mechanical effects are obvious are about a million times (very crudely) smaller.