What book are you currently reading?

Shaun

Founder
Moderator
I'm re-reading 2001: A Space Odyssey and loving it.

Despite being written in 1968 it is still very accessible and I find myself relating current technology to the ideas Arthur presented in the story; such as the news beamed to the transport ship taking Dr. Floyd to the moon base (Internet / Netbook anyone?) and HAL 9000 who, 44 years on, is still being worked on, in small bits, in labs the world over, but it still nowhere near becoming a reality.

What are you reading?
 

Scoosh

Velocouchiste
Moderator
Location
Edinburgh
Sky's the Limit - and enjoying it too. :thumbsup:
 
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Raging Squirrel

Well-Known Member
Location
North West
i'm currently reading Dark Summit which is about a climber named David Sharp who was just apparently left to die on Everest. The book goes thorugh the story of a lot of problems relating to the commercialisation of the mountain through companies who will basically try their hardest to get you to the top with the help of others. David Sharp was apparently passed by a lot of climbers who ignored him so that they could carry on with their summit assault, only later to say they either didn't see him or thought he was beyond help.

at the minute I'm obsessed with anything to do with Everest, and have just finished Into Thin Air which was about the 1996 disaster which claimed many lives, deffo worth a read.
 
When The Lights Went Out - Britain in the Seventies by Andy Beckett

It's "social history" (groan), but full of surprises and very well written. It's about when I grew up and it has helped me to reconcile what I remember with what actually happened.
Funnily enough, I pulled the switch as a young lad in the 70s, putting the lights out in Brentwood, as my dad worked for the electricity board, which had the responsibilty to adhere to govenment regulations.

Currently reading (and enjoying) Rolf Harris' autobiography Can You Tell What it is Yet?
 

Standoff

Active Member
When The Lights Went Out - Britain in the Seventies by Andy Beckett

It's "social history" (groan), but full of surprises and very well written. It's about when I grew up and it has helped me to reconcile what I remember with what actually happened.
Think I'll give this a go!
 

Pat "5mph"

A kilogrammicaly challenged woman
Moderator
Location
Glasgow
Since joining CChat much less reading than my usual, hoping the novelty of this chatty forum will wear off, to get back to reading my usual 3 books a week :laugh:
Pure - by Andrew Miller, about a future with an extinct human race and the story of a comedian long dead.
At first thought it was the usual pretentious futuristic doom story, it's growing on me now, the main character is interesting.

Edit: Andrew Miller was last week, this one is called "the possibility of an island" by Michael Houellebecq"
 

MisterStan

Label Required
Some Andy McNab fiction rubbish, I apologise, but since I'm on the bike and not on the bus for 2 hours a day I have less time for reading. I have Steve Jobs' biography to get through but it's so heavy I haven't had the heart to pick it up yet.....
 

Pat "5mph"

A kilogrammicaly challenged woman
Moderator
Location
Glasgow
Blimey, Pat, you're full of surprises as usual - that sounds interesting! :hello:
Sorry, got the title and author wrong, edited the post :blush:
 
Just Ride by Grant Petersen (of Rivendell Bike Works). Brilliant, brilliant radical and yet entirely common sense approach to cycling. Its nice to have some of my carefully assembled preconceptions shaken. Very highly recommended.
 

TransientStates

Regular
Location
Manchester
Game of Thrones by George R R Martin. The tv series was great so I thought I'd give the books a go. The story is great though the writing is occasionally lacking. Worth a read, particularly if you like historical novels by the likes of Conn Iggulden and the comedy fantasy of Terry Pratchett.
 

Rickshaw Phil

Overconfidentii Vulgaris
Moderator
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman. I wasn't keen when the series was on the telly a few years back but having liked some of his other books I thought I'd give the novel a chance. Enjoying it so far - the fantasy works better when the pictures are imagined rather than on a screen.

Apart from that I'm also part way through "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow" by Jerome K Jerome and "A Spectacle of Dust" - Pete Postlethwaite's autobiography.
 
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