What luggage system are you using?

Panter

Just call me Chris...
I'm getting fed up with a sweaty back!
Apart from that, a rucksack is ideal but I want to try something different, rack, pannier/rack bag something like that.
What do you use for your commute?

I don't have a great deal to carry, few tools, spare tubes etc, lunch, wallet, rain jacket... pretty much the usual except for a Monday when I take in shirts and milk for the week.
It will probably be for the MTB (it's what I've been using for the last 3 Months) but would be ideal if its a system I can swap to the road bike if I decide to use that instead, especially over the Summer.
I don't have a long commute, it's about 12 mile round trip but I'm doing it every day.

Any recommendations? I don't want to buy something that I could use for World touring, or conversely, get something inadequate!
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
I really like Carradice saddlebags, personally. The weight sits behind you nicely, and there's enough room for the stuff you need for a commute.

My winter commuting bag (b/c of the need to take some warm stuff in) is a lowsaddle longflap, and my summer commuting bag is a Super C Audax.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Have a look at the Topeak system, bit expensive at first but very good quality. I've got 2 bikes with fixed racks and a beam rack for the others with 4 different size slide 'n' click bags (2 with 'drop down' side panniers) and the fixed racks also take my BIG Carradice panniers with a slide on bag on the top for valuables when touring.
 
OP
Panter

Panter

Just call me Chris...
Thank you both, quite a bewildering array of options with both of those!
I like the topeak stuff, I already have a couple of their small saddlebags and with a bit of imagination I used to be able to get away with just one of those in the Summer but it was very tight.
The Carradice are expensive, but look very versatile as I wouldn't need a bike specific rack then,,,, choices, choices!
I think that maybe I need to visit the LBS and have a look in person, and think long and hard about exactly what I want out of my luggage.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
The Carradice are expensive, but look very versatile as I wouldn't need a bike specific rack then,,,, choices, choices!
I think that maybe I need to visit the LBS and have a look in person, and think long and hard about exactly what I want out of my luggage.
They're a bit of an investment, but they do seem to last forever - the black ones go a sort of silvery grey with age (there's a chap on my train occasionally using one he bought in the '80s).

I guess the downside is that there's nothing all that elegant in terms of quick release mountings for them, but I've not had problems with the three attachment straps, personally - they don't take that long :smile: The shape of them is great for a commuter though - a long, wide, load space is much more convenient for getting to your stuff (panniers and rucksacks are narrow and deep, a PITA if you want something you unwisely packed at the bottom of the bag). The side pockets are good for tools and a spare inner tube.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
My favourite thing ever written about Carradice;

I've made the comparison before between a Carradice saddlebag and owning a pet.

Basically German products do what you want. They are well made and efficient. My Ortleib panniers, SON hub, Rohloff Hub, B&M lights are all class leaders.

My Brooks saddle requires tweaking and proofing, it doesn't work out of the box, it needs love and care (but will reward you, just like a Labrador Puppy).

Carradice Saddlebags sort of work out of the box but can be improved by spending more money on wire support racks or maybe a short length of broom handle wedged between bag and seat-post.

The german designers must look with on with dispair at how Brooks and Carradice get away with it.

Imagine buying a SON Dynamo that could be improved with the addition of a bit of broom handle.

Now I must go and put a saucer of milk out for my Carradice Barley.
https://yacf.co.uk/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=7307nqrvf6t4uqar851560ai07&topic=22961.msg412837#msg412837
 
OP
Panter

Panter

Just call me Chris...
They're a bit of an investment, but they do seem to last forever - the black ones go a sort of silvery grey with age (there's a chap on my train occasionally using one he bought in the '80s).

I guess the downside is that there's nothing all that elegant in terms of quick release mountings for them, but I've not had problems with the three attachment straps, personally - they don't take that long :smile: The shape of them is great for a commuter though - a long, wide, load space is much more convenient for getting to your stuff (panniers and rucksacks are narrow and deep, a PITA if you want something you unwisely packed at the bottom of the bag). The side pockets are good for tools and a spare inner tube.
Thanks John, that makes a lot of sense. I don't actually have to worry about unclipping the thing, I keep the bike inside at work. It would be an advantage if I could, but I could just keep day to day items in a carrier bag inside that and take that up to my office.
Nice to know they last, I'm quite happy to pay out on something if its well made.
My LBS doesn't stock Carradice, but it does look as if it may be the best option for me, not needing a rack.
Are there any options for fitting lights to them? both of mine are on the seatpost so would be obscured by that system.
 

helston90

Eat, sleep, ride, repeat.
Location
Cornwall
I have a Topeak Dynapack saddle bag as per below- it works very well, it doesn't move around and is nice and secure. I manage to get in everything i need for the day- not sure you'd get 5 x shirts in it if you didn't have an iron at work?
My only gripe is that neither it nor the rain cover are water proof- which since they are right in the firing line is a disappointment, a few carrier bags does the trick.
Also I have found with the clamp in place I can still stick on a normal saddle bag for pleasure rides without having to take the whole seat post out which is a bonus.




topeak-dynapack-seatpost-bag-39267.jpg
 
OP
Panter

Panter

Just call me Chris...
That's fantastic! I must admit I do lean towards the German philosophy most of the time. However, there's time for me to change!
 
OP
Panter

Panter

Just call me Chris...
I have a Topeak Dynapack saddle bag as per below- it works very well, it doesn't move around and is nice and secure. I manage to get in everything i need for the day- not sure you'd get 5 x shirts in it if you didn't have an iron at work?
My only gripe is that neither it nor the rain cover are water proof- which since they are right in the firing line is a disappointment, a few carrier bags does the trick.
Also I have found with the clamp in place I can still stick on a normal saddle bag for pleasure rides without having to take the whole seat post out which is a bonus.




View attachment 76228
That's immense! I think the Carradice system would give me more versatility, but that does sit nicely, and is a good place for a light.
I'm not too worried about waterproofing to be honest, most waterproof bags aren't after a while and I've been relying on carrier bags this long anyway!
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
Are there any options for fitting lights to them? both of mine are on the seatpost so would be obscured by that system.
Yep - most have a light loop, and you can clip a light behind the metal "Carradice" plate on the lowsaddle. You have to be slightly careful about how you pack the bag, so the light doesn't droop.

I don't use the rack anymore, but this is the only picture I can find of mine with light in place;
http://monkeyphotomcr.blogspot.co.uk/2009/09/mines-priscilla.html (at the top of the writing)

I also have a light mounted to the chainstay.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
That's fantastic! I must admit I do lean towards the German philosophy most of the time. However, there's time for me to change!
A bit like Brooks, they do tend to hold their value (or at least, they did). Worth double checking on eBay, but I don't think you'd lose a lot moving it on if you really didn't get on with it.
 
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