What will the long term effects of the virus? Will something never be the same?

Notafettler

Well-Known Member
Let me start with the supermarkets.
They will be the losers.
The move to deliveries will rise rapidly much faster than it was doing.
There will be a big increase in convenience shops. I have noticed this happening for a while. Particularly by the coop which is uncompetitive except in market towns where there is little competition.
The main supermarkets will have to close down thousands of supermarkets. They will probably keep open the large ones where the delivery are picked. Or maybe they will go down the Ocado route?
So what will all these old supermarkets be used for? Remembering that they lease a huge amount of them.
Knocked down replaced by houses?
How will Aldi and Lidl fare in this new shopping world?
 

neil_merseyside

Über Member
Location
Wirral
Let me start with the supermarkets.
They will be the losers.
The move to deliveries will rise rapidly much faster than it was doing.
There will be a big increase in convenience shops. I have noticed this happening for a while. Particularly by the coop which is uncompetitive except in market towns where there is little competition.
The main supermarkets will have to close down thousands of supermarkets. They will probably keep open the large ones where the delivery are picked. Or maybe they will go down the Ocado route?
So what will all these old supermarkets be used for? Remembering that they lease a huge amount of them.
Knocked down replaced by houses?
How will Aldi and Lidl fare in this new shopping world?
I don't think supermarkets will fare too badly, most folk want to pick their own fruit and meat - and since supermarkets have seen off grocers and butchers they will stay around for a bit, perhaps the biggies will go and the likes of Lidl and Aldi become even more common - I mean it's such a novelty having fresh RIPE fruit and veg with flavour rather than the easily transported unripe stuff.
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
If working from home becomes the accepted and practical way of working for lots of firms. Just think how much commuting will be cut back. There will be less need to further reduce carbon emissions and we can all go off and live in remote country locations. Property prices in the city, especially inside the M25 will fall as there will be no need to work within commuting distance of the office.

Life is never going to be the same.
 
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Notafettler

Well-Known Member
I don't think supermarkets will fare too badly, most folk want to pick their own fruit and meat - and since supermarkets have seen off grocers and butchers they will stay around for a bit, perhaps the biggies will go and the likes of Lidl and Aldi become even more common - I mean it's such a novelty having fresh RIPE fruit and veg with flavour rather than the easily transported unripe stuff.
I was suggesting that supermarkets will close a lot of there big shops sooner than would have happened if it wasn't for the virus. For the things you forgot or want fresh you will go to your local convenience shop. And maybe some greengrocers will reopen?
Note a lot of butchers are actually selling over the internet. Doing next day deliveries by courier. I get frozen dog food deliveries by courier.
Oh and the pub started doing takeaways? Starting last night.
 
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Notafettler

Well-Known Member
One daughter has to travel 150miles to London twice a week. Twice a week she works from home. At the moment she is working more from home. But it's only possible if you have a decent internet. She had to get satellite internet. So even for those living rural with uber shite internet connection it's possible to work from home......oh my good what effect will that have on rural house prices?
Will locals ever be able to buy or even rent a house?
 

pjd57

Veteran
Location
Glasgow
Anyone I know who is able to work from home says it is far more productive.
No or fewer interruptions , less management interference.
They do far more in less time.

Maybe companies will start to take it seriously now.
 

Mugshot

Cracking a solo.
I think an enormous amount of businesses will shut the doors, and a huge number of people will become unemployed, though I don't think the supermarkets will be too adversely affected.
The first hurdle will be whether the government support will be enough to see you through and if it isn't, just how long is any business owner going to carry on pumping their own money into a business that they can't guarantee when or even if it will be viable again?
I think many business owners that are approaching retirement age will decide to just lock up and walk away, it's just not worth the hassle.
And regarding hassle, this may be a once in a lifetime/century/whatever event, but it's happened and in 5 years time who's to say that something (whatever it may be) wont happen again and it's brought home to thousands of business owners just how vulnerable they are to something which is completely out of their control. So again, you ask yourself, is it worth the hassle?
Then you have the knock on, how does the closing of one business adversely affect the viability of another?
It will depend on government response, speed of delivery of vaccine, and people's willingness to either heed the advice or obey the rules when they come.
There are very few sectors that will not likely be devastated by this. There will however be others, and we know which they are, that will be making enormous pots of money out of it.
 
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Notafettler

Well-Known Member
Anyone I know who is able to work from home says it is far more productive.
No or fewer interruptions , less management interference.
They do far more in less time.
I have my doubts on that.......if they have very young children at home!
 
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