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What's a Reynolds frame?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Maz, 27 Jul 2007.

  1. Maz

    Maz Guru

    Excuse my ignorance (maybe this should be asked in 'beginners') Are these old-style (70s?) road bike frames? So would they necessarily be made of steel? Do they still make them?
    I was interested in buying one as it was dirt cheap.
     
  2. zimzum42

    zimzum42 Legendary Member

    They are made with tubing which is manufactured by a company called reynolds.

    Typically it means a classic styled steel frame......
     
  3. Maz

    Maz Guru

    Cheers, zimzum.
     
  4. Maz

    Maz Guru

    One more thing (about the same bike). It had drop-bars and the brakes had extensions which ran roughly parallel to the tops of the handlbar...do these types of brake handles have a special name?
     
  5. Tim Bennet.

    Tim Bennet. Entirely Average Member

    Location:
    S of Kendal
    Yes, they were called suicide levers, as they were so bendy and inefficient that to use them to slow down in an emergency was usually so futile to be tantamount to committing suicide.

    Don't confuse these old style ones with the more modern 'cross levers' which do the same job but work on a totally different (and very efficient) principal.
     
  6. Maz

    Maz Guru

    Yikes! Thanks for telling me that, Tim!
     
  7. Monty Dog

    Monty Dog New Member

    Location:
    Fleet
    Reynolds were a UK company, formerly part of the TI industrial group amd reknown for their range of alloy steel tubing. Most famously, they developed the first butted steel tube, 531, which was the ubiquitous frame material from about the 50s to the 80s. In the 70s they launched 753, a lighter, heat-treated tubing used for top-quality frames. There are also other steel tubesets, such as 631, 653, 853 and more recently 953. With the advent of aluminium alloys and composites, they are less common today, generally used for touring and bespoke frames. Some very basic frames may have used Reynolds tubing for the 3 main frame tubes, but cheaper plain-gauge chrome-moly for the seat and chainstays - so Reynolds tubes doesn't necessarily means it's of the highest quality - Raleigh for one did this commonly. Suicide levers were often fitted to low rent frames, so it sounds as though you've got a fairly basic frame.
     
  8. Maz

    Maz Guru

    Thanks for all the fine info. After all that, it's only fair you should see the bike...it was only a tenner when I last looked yesterday.

    Here's the Bike
     
  9. zimzum42

    zimzum42 Legendary Member

    It's up at £31 now, not sure I would pay that for it, sounded good for a tenner.......

    Don't like the seller's tone about the charge for not picking it up......
     
  10. fuzzy29

    fuzzy29 New Member

    Location:
    Somerset
    Emmelle were one of the cheaper makes of bikes in their day. The cranks also use pins rather than the now standard bolt connection. My experience of these is they're a pain in the ar$e. Also, the long chainstays will not help with climbing. If you are after a cheap bike, try your local free ads paper. These may have very cheap bikes or even free if you collect. On eBay, there will always be a cost and possibly a delivery charge.
     
  11. hubgearfreak

    hubgearfreak Über Member

    if that's the sort of thing you want, this may be a better buy
    250144627196