When You Get A Puncture, How Do You Go About Making The Repair?

Lovacott

Well-Known Member
Don't get me wrong, I know how to fix a flat tyre. I've done it more times than I care to remember.

I have a traditional glue and patch kit but I rarely use it on the road. I prefer to carry a spare tube.

So my question isn't about how you fix the leak, it's more about how you support the bike whilst you effect the repair.

I used to simply flip my bike over using the saddle and handlebars as a stand.

But now, I have so much paraphernalia on the handlebars, I can't do that any more (phone, cycle computer, lights, bike cam etc). I also have panniers on the back.

It's not so bad if I get a front blowout. I can stand the bike on the forks once I get the front wheel off.

It's the rear wheel that is tricky (as I discovered the other day).

I was lucky in that I had a luggage strap in my panniers and there was a farm gate nearby. I tied the saddle to the top rail of the gate to keep the back end of the bike off the ground once I'd removed the wheel. However, I won't always be that lucky (but I have now added the luggage strap to my essential toolkit which I always carry on the bike).

How do you guys get around this problem?
 

Mo1959

Legendary Member
If there's nothing handy, I just lay it carefully on the verge on the non drive side, but often if you're passing fields there are wire fences which you can hook the saddle over enough to support the bike. My brain doesn't work upside down so I don't think I could replace a rear wheel that way anyway! :laugh:
 
OP
Lovacott

Lovacott

Well-Known Member
If there's nothing handy, I just lay it carefully on the verge on the non drive side, but often if you're passing fields there are wire fences which you can hook the saddle over enough to support the bike. My brain doesn't work upside down so I don't think I could replace a rear wheel that way anyway! :laugh:
I've always done my bike maintenance with the bike flipped on its head until very recently.

Now, I support the bike with a strap under a rafter in the shed which I must admit, I much prefer (especially for indexing gears and messing with the brakes).

My reverse brain issue has always come when when undoing nuts and bolts. I have a mental block on clockwise and anti clockwise when looking at anything arse about face. I've stripped a few threads as a result.
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
I stopped using glue and patches a long time ago. Although I still carry them. I use sef adhesive patches. I take the wheel out and lay the bike on the non drive side. I have heard that turning the bike upside down on bikes with hydraulic brakes can cause problems.
 

screenman

Legendary Member
I stopped using glue and patches a long time ago. Although I still carry them. I use sef adhesive patches. I take the wheel out and lay the bike on the non drive side. I have heard that turning the bike upside down on bikes with hydraulic brakes can cause problems.
Mine get turned upside down often, never had any problems with the brakes afterwards.
 

FrankCrank

Professional layabout
Another dilemma is whether to remove the clear plastic film after the patch is stuck on the tube.
I choose to leave it there.....................despite the weight penalty :laugh:
 
OP
Lovacott

Lovacott

Well-Known Member
I stopped using glue and patches a long time ago. Although I still carry them. I use self adhesive patches. I take the wheel out and lay the bike on the non drive side. I have heard that turning the bike upside down on bikes with hydraulic brakes can cause problems.
I only carry glue and patches to make a repair to the replaced tube once I get into work. I keep my spare tube, a dumbbell spanner and set of levers under my seat (held in with duct tape).

For quite a number of years, I always did a roadside repair but they are difficult when it's raining or very dark (or both).

The problem I have with laying the bike down, is that a lot of my commute is single track lanes bounded by large Devon Banks so the only place I can lay the bike is in the middle of the road. The farm gate entrances are mud baths so I can't lay the bike in them either.

The strapping of the saddle to the top rail of the farm gate idea worked quite well and I like Mo1959's idea of using wire fencing to support the bike (although wire fencing is pretty rare in the UK).
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
I have heard that turning the bike upside down on bikes with hydraulic brakes can cause problems.
Time is a factor.

Hydraulic brakes should survive being turned upside down for the few minutes it takes to fix a puncture.

Leaving them turned upside down for hours on end might lead to air bubbles in places you don't want them.

The instruction manual for my Tektro hydraulics says do not turn the bike upside down.

I've done it to fix punctures without any problem.
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
Time is a factor.

Hydraulic brakes should survive being turned upside down for the few minutes it takes to fix a puncture.

Leaving them turned upside down for hours on end might lead to air bubbles in places you don't want them.

The instruction manual for my Tektro hydraulics says do not turn the bike upside down.

I've done it to fix punctures without any problem.
I have hung hydraulic braked bike upside down for years with no ill effects, absolute worse case a pump of the lever fixes any sponginess.
 
OP
Lovacott

Lovacott

Well-Known Member
Mine get turned upside down often, never had any problems with the brakes afterwards.
I'm considering hydraulic brakes at the moment but I must admit, I'm pretty happy with my cable disc brakes.

What are the advantages of hydraulics over cable?
 
Top Bottom