Why do American cyclists...

yeah, they need proper names like Bradley and Geraint.

L
 
It could have been worse; they could have kept the Dutch as their early masters!

Some of them are pretty cool, though! :thumbsup:

Aart

Arendt

Alberick

Boudewyn

Stoffel

Coenraadt

Theodorick

Egbert

Freek

Frem

Geert

Gijs

Guido

Gysbert

Hieronimus

Jaap

Jeronimus

Joost

Keesje

Leen

Lodewyk

Ludovicus

Meewes

Merlijn

Rijpert

Rip

Sjouke

Teeuwis

Tiebout

Tijs

Theodorick

Toon
 
Egbert Egbert - that's double dutch.

Coe-lin (Powell) is an American pronunciation of an 'ordinary' name which makes me sigh...

Truman... Chet... Wilson... Bart..I dunno. Once upon a time in the days of yore, there was a GB weightlifter - Precious McKenzie - now that's a real limey name!

Unfortunately,the offspring of Madonna, Bob Geldof - and others I'm sure - are lumbered with names that would give cycling commentators a problem.

"Roll on Paris" - could mean anything these days!
 

yenrod

Guest
Etiene De Wilde - what a name :thumbsup:
 

gavintc

Guru
Location
Southsea
The problem with us Brits is that because Americans speak a similar English languange, we think they should be similar to us in other ways too. They are foreigners, a completely different culture, as different as Germans are to Brits. Funny names, funny laws, funny customs are just part of it.
 

Tim Bennet.

Entirely Average Member
Location
S of Kendal
I agree there's no reason for them to have names familiar to us. Very few of them are descended form 'English' immigrants. It's only George Bush that we can be really proud of as one of us (from Suffolk) amongst the recent political elite, for example.

Amongst our friends and work mates in the States, only one had a familiar sounding name - 'Dave Brown'. But it turned out it was an Anglicised version his family had adopted on arrival in the States as Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.

The common American name I have the most problem with is 'Randy'. It's always associated with one of those traumatic experiences of youth that's hard to get over. My first trip to the States was to join a climbing expedition. On arrival, this bloke bounded over to me and said "Hi, I'm Randy. We're sharing a tent". Gulp!

The north of England and the west coast of the States could have been on separate planets in the early 70's. Whole place was bonkers. Everyone owned a car...... houses were huge...... Some of them were vegetarians .... 'Yosemite' didn't rhyme with Marmite.... And some of the girls.... well, probably best leave it there.
 
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