Womans intermidiate flat bar Sora xs

Bhitucyclist

Senior Member
Morning friends
Finally got this one yesterday.
Its defo lighter and faster than my pendelton.... i feel a bit wobbly on it though... gears are different .. not the rolling ones. The wheels are super thin compared to my current bike... anything i should consider before taking to the road . Any safety tips ?
 

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anything i should consider before taking to the road . Any safety tips ?
Make sure the tyres are pumped up enough. Thinner tyres are more susceptible to pinch punctures if you hit any potholes. Higher pressures help prevent this and protects the rim from damage too.
Don't feel you have to ride faster just because you have a 'faster' bike. Safety first, if you are not happy or don't feel in control in any situation then slow down to the speed where you do. This bike will handle differently to your last bike and it may take a while to get used to it. Don't worry, this is normal. It took around a thousand miles before I really felt totally happy on my last new bike.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Morning friends
Finally got this one yesterday.
Its defo lighter and faster than my pendelton.... i feel a bit wobbly on it though... gears are different .. not the rolling ones. The wheels are super thin compared to my current bike... anything i should consider before taking to the road . Any safety tips ?
The tyres need to be kept quite hard to avoid 'pinch flats'
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Make sure the tyres are pumped up enough. Thinner tyres are more susceptible to pinch punctures if you hit any potholes. Higher pressures help prevent this and protects the rim from damage too.
Don't feel you have to ride faster just because you have a 'faster' bike. Safety first, if you are not happy or don't feel in control in any situation then slow down to the speed where you do. This bike will handle differently to your last bike and it may take a while to get used to it. Don't worry, this is normal. It took around a thousand miles before I really felt totally happy on my last new bike.
Snap. :okay:
 
OP
Bhitucyclist

Bhitucyclist

Senior Member
Make sure the tyres are pumped up enough. Thinner tyres are more susceptible to pinch punctures if you hit any potholes. Higher pressures help prevent this and protects the rim from damage too.
Don't feel you have to ride faster just because you have a 'faster' bike. Safety first, if you are not happy or don't feel in control in any situation then slow down to the speed where you do. This bike will handle differently to your last bike and it may take a while to get used to it. Don't worry, this is normal. It took around a thousand miles before I really felt totally happy on my last new bike.
Thanks ! :smile: should i keep it at any particular pressure ... for my current bike i was told 40 is right.
I am excited but a bit nervous as the wheels are so narrow ... specially while turnings etc i dont want to skid and have a fall.
Any tips on those kind of moves pls ?
 
OP
Bhitucyclist

Bhitucyclist

Senior Member
Oh i was thinking of putting /carrrying couple of water bottles to increase the weight initially and then once i am steady then riding more freely ... is that a silly idea ?
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Have the pedals got toe cages on?

Unless you are really keen on those, simple flats are probably best for getting used to the bike.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
The fitted Michelin Dynamic tyres are budget types and although they should roll well puncture resistance is reportedly poor so pack a puncture repair kit, a couple of tyre levers and good compact pump. You should consider replacing them with more puncture resistant tyres in time.
Apart from that just go out and enjoy.
TP should be about 100 so you might need a track pump. They're not going to be too comfy at that so maybe consider fitting bigger ones when it comes to replacing , that's if the frame will allow.
No other safety tips just be alert, we need more lerts!
 
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Oh i was thinking of putting /carrrying couple of water bottles to increase the weight initially and then once i am steady then riding more freely ... is that a silly idea ?
It won't make too much of a difference to how the bike feels and handles, that's dictated by the geometry of the frame and the components, not the weight, so just take it easy and get used to it and enjoy.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Thanks ! :smile: should i keep it at any particular pressure ... for my current bike i was told 40 is right.
I am excited but a bit nervous as the wheels are so narrow ... specially while turnings etc i dont want to skid and have a fall.
Any tips on those kind of moves pls ?
It depends on your weight (including bike) and the width of the tyre,

bertopresschart-roadcc.gif

As a rule of thumb we reckon on a 60% rear 40% front split as the weight given is for individual wheels to give the best balance of grip/comfort/puncture resistance.

Your front tyre will generally be 10/15 psi lower pressure than the rear.
 
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Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Tyre pressure is a topic in itself, but generally the less volume the tyre has the higher the pressure.

Your new bike with narrower tyres will take higher pressure than your Pendleton.

Assuming you are not ridiculously heavy, I would go with about 60psi in the back and 50 in the front.

A few psi here or there won't make much difference, but if you raise or lower by 10psi you will almost certainly be able to detect a change in the ride.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
At 50 psi you're going to be tempting punctures and pinch flats on 25c hp tyres but it will be more comfortable. I would suggest you try various options and see what works best.
 
Had a look on Decathlon at the spec of your bike, it's a great package. Good range of gears should suit most conditions and the rest of the bike looks just as well thought out.
Don't worry about rushing out to change the tyres. Try them and see how you get on, they will probably suit you just fine. You are no more likely to slip or fall off with narrower tyres unless you go faster, or tense up because you are worried.

Tyre pressure is a compromise between comfort and avoiding flats/rim damage. Lower pressures are more comfortable for a long ride but will also slightly increase the effort needed to ride at a given speed. This only really matters if you are racing, otherwise, just ride at the pressure/speed/effort you are happy with and enjoy the trip. I guess the fact you have bought an XS size bike means you don't weigh 90+kg so there is no need for you to ride on 90-100psi tyres.
I would suggest starting off at around 60-70psi and adjusting up or down from there depending on how it feels. Start with lower at the front than the rear, maybe 60psi Fr and 65-70psi Rr.

If and when you change tyres you could look at going up 1 or 2 sizes depending on frame clearance. Your existing tyres are 25mm, you might be able to fit 28mm or even 32mm. The larger tyres will give more comfort for the same or lower pressures and be less vulnerable to pinch punctures from hitting holes in the road.

Most importantly, enjoy your new bike. Ride it, get to know it, have fun :okay:
 
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