Your Views On Toddlers Wearing Helmets When Carried On A Bike

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rusky

CC Addict
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Hove
As per the title really.

I take our 3 1/2 year old to nursery 3 days a week.

What's the thoughts on him wearing a helmet??
 
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rusky

rusky

CC Addict
Location
Hove
 
http://www.thudguard.com/ You know it makes sense!

Seriously though that's a decision only you can make. To balance MP's point though most seat designs do a pretty good job of cocooning the child so that even if the bike falls over they are very unlikey to hit their head.
 
Thudguard!

For many years I have advocated the use of the Thudguard in helmet debates , and now they have a Cycle Helmet!
 
Seriously though...

It is really up to you to make an informed choice.

All the normal advice reference the need for fit, comfort, security and a reasonable standard of testing (higher than EN1078)

Unfortunately for children this is made more difficult by their neck strength, development, and the size of their head.

At 31/2 this is easier, but not necessarily easy.

Lots of useful information here
 

Linford

Guest
The thing about an accident (incident) when you actually lose control of the vehicle/bike etc or get hit off is that you have realistically no idea how you are going to land. You may just slide, you may roll, you may connect with the kerb, or a vehicle.

Anyone who advocates a lid for their child is automatically acknowledging that a properly fitting lid is going to help reduce the severity of impact.
 
The thing about an accident (incident) when you actually lose control of the vehicle/bike etc or get hit off is that you have realistically no idea how you are going to land. You may just slide, you may roll, you may connect with the kerb, or a vehicle.

Anyone who advocates a lid for their child is automatically acknowledging that a properly fitting lid is going to help reduce the severity of impact.
Tim Gill puts it very well.

Tragedies happen; child cyclists are killed or left disabled for life; and we cannot let go of the belief that something could and should have been done to stop that particular event from happening
Yet infant deaths involving cycling represent under 1% of under 4 accidental fatalities meaning there are many other areas we should be worrying about first before cycling.
 
This is why I lightheartedly mentioned Thudguard

Although I have always thought that the child's face in this picture sums the situation up quite nicely..

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRmsW0MKWuoUTKiKaoms3ehhz184i87eX2FCA6blDAJRhesjdijgg.jpg


They have been the opposite way round, they have designed and advocated helmet use for all sorts of day to day activities and used all the emotive blackmail and pseudo-medical claims to justify their use, and have now decided to include cycle helmets!
 
Anyone who advocates a lid for their child is automatically acknowledging that a properly fitting lid is going to help reduce the severity of impact.
My emphasis

Which will only be the case of a typical well informed and knowledgeable cyclist on this web site, but research show just how many parents think (or are indeed encouraged by the likes of Headway et al) that any old helmet perched on the child's head will save them.
 
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rusky

rusky

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Location
Hove
Thanks for all the advice.

I think there's a good chance of me dripping the bike just getting on or off!
 
Thanks for all the advice.

I think there's a good chance of me dripping the bike just getting on or off!
Mounting and dismounting is more difficult - it is only a matter of time before you forget and try to swing your leg over the seat!

Just take care and you should be alright

However dropping the bike can be prevented when putting the child in or out of the seat.

Whilst it should never be relied on to balance the bike when the child is in the seat a two legged stand can free the other hand whilst putting the child in the seat. Secondly there used to be a handlebar yoke to prevent the bars turning as well.
 

jdtate101

Ex-Fatman
When it comes to cycling with my kids, I chose a trailer rather than a seat as I didn't like the top heavy centre of gravity they cause, and I have two kids to move, so a trailer was the only sensible option. When I did a test ride with a rear seat it was ok but awkward. The hardest part, as others have mentioned is getting on and off. Trailers are great because the kids don't have to wear a helmet, but can be very heavy when going up hills...:heat:
 
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