Are road bike tyres more prone to punctures than hybrid tyres?

Bhitucyclist

Well-Known Member
Hi all , i ride a hybrid. I am trying to increase my riding speed and was suggested that i could change the tyres to sleek road tyres.
However my exp of riding mountain/hybrid is never had a puncture in last 5 years . So wanted to find out what is your exp and if you had any preference to any particular tyre type ?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Hi all , i ride a hybrid. I am trying to increase my riding speed and was suggested that i could change the tyres to sleek road tyres.
However my exp of riding mountain/hybrid is never had a puncture in last 5 years . So wanted to find out what is your exp and if you had any preference to any particular tyre type ?
Some are, some aren't, depends on the tyre. What bike do you ride, what tyres, what surfaces/terrain/traffic conditions?
 

Edwardoka

Prolix Maximus
Theoretically: hybrid tyres have more surface area so are more likely to pick up detritus. Road bike tyres typically run at higher pressures so more chance of them deflecting sharp objects, but hybrid and MTB tyres have more rubber knobbly bits that can be pierced/gouged without penetrating the tyre casing.

In reality: combination of tyre quality/condition and blind luck.
I've ridden some very gnarly off-road stuff on 23mm road tyres with a full touring load just fine, only to puncture a few hours later on a smooth tarmac road.
 
Last edited:
Hi all , i ride a hybrid. I am trying to increase my riding speed and was suggested that i could change the tyres to sleek road tyres.
However my exp of riding mountain/hybrid is never had a puncture in last 5 years . So wanted to find out what is your exp and if you had any preference to any particular tyre type ?
You've gone and done it now :whistle:
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Hybrid rims are probably too wide for anything smaller than 28mm but that is as narrow as you need to go.
Narrower tyres have more rolling resistance at the same pressure, but can accept higher pressure. They also have less air resistance which is significant at high speed. It is all swings and roundabouts but the overall view is that for cruising around and on rougher surfaces, fat slick tyres are more efficient. For going fast on smooth surfaces, narrower tyres are better.
Modern wider slicks benefit from construction and technology that used to be available only on narnar slicks
 

lane

Veteran
In general without too much exception (for traveling on roads) the faster a tyre is the more prone to punctures it will be. So you have to balance speed against puncture resistance and decide what your priority is.
 

SuperHans123

Formerly known as snertos999
I am a hybrid snert and punctures are extremely rare.
I think it is a combination of the following:-
  • Knobbly tyres with puncture protection if the sharp bit misses the knobbly bits
  • Slower speeds so more chance of avoiding obvious hazards like glass etc
  • Cycle more on cycle paths which tend to be smoother than the sides of roads
  • Anecdotally do less miles than road faring snerts, ergo less tarmac covered, less risk
As well as all this there is blind good/bad luck
 
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