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Bike Rack Etiquette

Discussion in 'Commuting' started by Tetedelacourse, 13 Aug 2007.

  1. Tetedelacourse

    Tetedelacourse New Member

    Location:
    Rosyth
    We have two bike shelters at my work. One is usually pretty busy, I am often the only user of the second one. Reason being the second one doubles up as a smoking area. This doesn't bother me too much and in fact I'd rather folk were standing nearby my bike when I'm not there than not. But it never gets swept out so if you put your bag on the ground to lock the bike up it gets covered in ash. Filfy abit!

    Anyway this morning I chose to use the other bike shed but most of the stands (those upside down metal U things) already had locks on them, but I was first into the shed. I too leave my lock at work cos it's too heavy to lug around.

    Is it bad etiquette to lock a bike on a bar which already has a lock on it but no bike? What's the consensus? Just wondering.

    I didn't but would have if I hadn't found a lockless bar.
     
  2. alecstilleyedye

    alecstilleyedye nothing in moderation Staff Member

    i leave a lock on my favourite spot at work, but as i'm the only regular office hours user of the bike shed, it's not an issue.
     
  3. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    York, UK
    Leaving a lock on the rack doesn't 'claim' it. And anyway, I guess there are two sides to each rack? So the 'owner' can just use the other side to you. And they could always take the radical step of unlocking the lock and moving it to another rack... Sod 'em..

    Isn't there supposed to be a risk leaving you lock lying around anyway? - of theives tampering with it in the hope that you'll then leave the bike unlocked, or locked with a wimpy lock...
     
  4. BentMikey

    BentMikey Rider of Seolferwulf

    Location:
    South London
    I would never take any account of a lock on a bike stand. If there's no bike, then it's fair game for someone else to go lock their bike there.


    Apparently it's a common tactic for a thief to put superglue in your lock so you can't use it, and hope you'll leave your bike there unlocked when you no longer have a working lock.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Tetedelacourse

    Tetedelacourse New Member

    Location:
    Rosyth
    Eek I never thought of that. But I only leave my bike in there during office hours and we're in a secure car park, with said puffers kicking about most of the day so it's probably ok for me. I even left it unlocked once when I forgot my keys and just draped the lock over it.

    Now come along fate, you have been tempted.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    Tetedelacourse

    Tetedelacourse New Member

    Location:
    Rosyth
    Jeezus I've just seen Mikey's post!;):ohmy:

    I'm playing right into these scumbags' fingerless gloved hands!
     
  7. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    not that much of a risk, because you dont' have to leave it unlocked if you find superglue in it. In fact you'd have to be pretty damn stupid to, and all but the thickest of thieves probably realise this. I think this is just a bit of an urban myth tbh.
     
  8. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    No. it is bad etiquette however to lock your bike over someone else's such that they can't get theirs out without you removing yours first, or to put your lock through someone else's so they can't use it.
     
  9. alecstilleyedye

    alecstilleyedye nothing in moderation Staff Member

    the other regular daytime cyclist actually leaves his pinarello unlocked in the courtyardy area near the swimming pool. another, more occasional chap leaves his even more expensive pinarello in the same place, again unlocked.

    you can bet some theiving chav would go for my bike instead though, as they've probably heard of carrera ;)
     
  10. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    Lock it where you like.
     
  11. zimzum42

    zimzum42 Legendary Member

    get hold of an old, broken bike.

    Lock it to your favourite position.

    when you get to work, unlock it, and lock your nice bike in position.

    Leave the crap bike unlocked, and good luck to anyone who wants to steal it.

    Thus, you always get 'your' spot.......
     
  12. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    York, UK
    No. it is bad etiquette however to lock your bike over someone else's such that they can't get theirs out without you removing yours first, or to put your lock through someone else's so they can't use it.[/QUOTE]


    Well, durrr. Who said anything about doing that?

    If you leave your lock at work, and don't carry another, or only carry a lightweight cable lock, what else are you going to do, assuming you're one of the masses who don't really think about it, or don't know how common theft is? Yes, it's a stupid thing to do, but, and I don't know if you've noticed this, there are a lot of stupid people out there...

    The point is not that thieves necessarily expect a bike to be left unlocked, but that it may spend a day locked with only a flimsey lock that the owner wouldn't normally use as sole means of locking, and which they can easily cut.
     
  13. skwerl

    skwerl New Member

    Location:
    London
    No. it is bad etiquette however to lock your bike over someone else's such that they can't get theirs out without you removing yours first, or to put your lock through someone else's so they can't use it.[/quote]

    Now that is a theft tactic. You go to head home, find some numpty has locked their bike against yours and say, "sod it. I'll have to leave it here overnight". Next day, not surprisingly, both bikes are gone.
     
  14. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    Well they should think about it. Superglue's about £2.99 for a little tiny bottle, they should think about why someone would bother to do that.
    Hmmm... this is the unfortunate truth...
     
  15. BentMikey

    BentMikey Rider of Seolferwulf

    Location:
    South London
    The one bit that makes me think it might be an urban myth is that I would personally use some epoxy which can fill gaps, unlike most superglue. Not that I'd actually do this for real of course.