bike stretching

Abitrary

New Member
Today I was a looking at a different clause on the health and safety laminate at work while waiting for the kettle to boil, and then I realised it was the one above the one I last took notice of.

Back at home, I measured my height against a mark I scored in a door about 2 years ago, before I started cycle commuting every day, and sure enough, I've been stretched about 5 - 10 millimetres due to cycle commuting.

I think it's a combination of these things:

-Having a angular centre point of your rear on a saddle means that *both* your legs and upper body get stretched, unlike something like running which just compresses you linearly and vertically.
-Cycling first thing in the morning means that you get on the bike while your skeleton is the longest, which is proven to be when you're asleep
-Sitting down at work all today, and suddenly cycling home has some sort of spring action.

Has anyone *really radically* stretched since commuting, to the extent that their parents notice for example?
 

Twenty Inch

New Member
Location
Behind a desk
I stretch if I do lots of yoga, to the extent that I need the next trouser length up. My parents haven't noticed yet though. Thanks for nothing, Mum!
 
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Abitrary

New Member
Twenty Inch said:
I stretch if I do lots of yoga, to the extent that I need the next trouser length up. My parents haven't noticed yet though. Thanks for nothing, Mum!
If you've been doing if for a long time, it might have gone unnoticed as normal growth to your parents.

Next time you see a long lost auntie, she might get bewildered though.
 

Arch

Married to Night Train
Location
Salford, UK
I dunno. In the bike magazine I work for (oooh, it's cool being able to say that), I'm often used to test the adjustability of review bikes (esp recumbents or folders) and am habitually referred to in these reviews as "the shorter rider". So I don't think I can be stretching much...
 
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Abitrary

New Member
HLaB said:
I don't know if it true or not but I heard: years of cycling tightens the leg muscles making them shorter!
It makes the muscles shorter, but the skeleton longer.
 

Madcyclist

New Member
Location
Bucks
I can highly recommend Pilates as an excellent way to keep limber. I had to stop racing number of years ago due to a hereditary condition called Ankylosing Spondilitus and Pilates has given me my life back. Conventional bikes are still a no go unfortunately due to the riding position but I’m able to ride a unicycle due to upright position. Currently looking into getting a recumbent trike.
 

longers

Veteran
Good luck with that Madcyclist, I'm glad it works for you. My grandad had the same thing but did bugger all to help himself with it, or maybe not as much was known then on how to alleviate it.
 

Arch

Married to Night Train
Location
Salford, UK
Madcyclist said:
I can highly recommend Pilates as an excellent way to keep limber. I had to stop racing number of years ago due to a hereditary condition called Ankylosing Spondilitus and Pilates has given me my life back. Conventional bikes are still a no go unfortunately due to the riding position but I’m able to ride a unicycle due to upright position. Currently looking into getting a recumbent trike.

OOh, I hope you find a recumbent works for you!

Mind you, have you tried a really upright (sit up and beg) upright bike? I know you'll still be taking some weight on the arms, but some of them really do have a very upright position. Not very racy, I grant you, and if you're after speed, recumbent may well be the way to go, but for about town, a sit and beg type might be cheaper.. Best to go the whole hog, and have a basket on the front...;)
 

jashburnham

New Member
arranandy said:
Since I started doing pilates about 3 months ago my height has increased by about 1cm as my posture has improved. I would recommend pilates to anyone who has had a sore back as its really helped mine
Glad to hear this works, I'm starting a pilates course in Feb with the same aim.
 
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