braking on road bikes

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
well someone suggested to me in other post to ask for some advice on braking on a road bike. is it different to a hybrid? my bike is fairly new and was told that your brakes takes a while to break in, so should i be more careful going down hills until they have been worn in for a while. any advice would be really appreciated as don't want the same thing to happen again.
 

Gerry Attrick

Lincolnshire Mountain Rescue Consultant
It does take a wee while for pads and rims to become, shall we say intimately acquainted, but if they are adjusted correctly, it does not take long. No special break in procedures are required other than to be aware that full efficiency may take a while to develop.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
Whip the wheels out and scuff up the brake block surface with an emery board.

I use a surform ( surface forming tool ). It takes off about 0.5mm, which is the 'skin' of the block, revealing the proper friction material beneath.
 
OP
sarahpink

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
jimboalee said:
Whip the wheels out and scuff up the brake block surface with an emery board.

I use a surform ( surface forming tool ). It takes off about 0.5mm, which is the 'skin' of the block, revealing the proper friction material beneath.
any idea how i would do any of that? sorry i really am a stereotypical female blonde,:girl:i have no clue with how to even put a chain back on. i want to learn and have enquired about any cycle matience course to go on , but i cant even pump wheels up, just don't have the strength:blush: know i sound so stupid but you've got to start somewhere!
 
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sarahpink

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
these are the brake specifications ive got, can I upgrade these?

Front Brake:Light dual pivot brake, Teflon pivots, forged alloy, with standard padsRear Brake:Light dual pivot brake, Teflon pivots, forged alloy, with standard padsBrake Levers:Shimano 2300 STI, flight deck compatible
 

BrumJim

Forum Stalwart (won't take the hint and leave...)
If you want a job done properly, talk to jimboalee.

However most people just bed the brakes in by using them. Just be aware that they won't be as responsive the first few times.

Spent many a pointless hour trying to get a spec for bedding in brake pads. But for trains, not bikes. Seems like nothing better than a few high speed stops with plenty of room for error.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
I'd say the braking is very different on hybrids and race bikes. On my race bike I have to break about four times for every once or twice on the hybrid. Some of this is just that the race bike picks up so much extra speed. As the wheels are much lighter and thinner it's much easier to skid or wobble. I find you can get away monkeying around with the front brakes on the hybrid whereas you can't really on the race bike.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
There are quite a lot of videos on bicycle tutor but I've not found one exactly applicable yet http://bicycletutor.com/part/brake/

You basically need a set of allen keys and to loosen the brakes - the latter is done usually on race bikes by flicking something or pulling a noodle out if you have v brakes.
 

Spinney

Bimbleur extraordinaire
Location
Under the Edge
sarahpink said:
any idea how i would do any of that? sorry i really am a stereotypical female blonde,:girl:i have no clue with how to even put a chain back on. i want to learn and have enquired about any cycle matience course to go on , but i cant even pump wheels up, just don't have the strength:blush: know i sound so stupid but you've got to start somewhere!
You don't sound like a 'typical blonde' to me - you want to learn how to do it!
(my idea of the stereotypical blonde is "I don't need to know how to do it cos a man will be along to do it for me....")

You'll get there!
 

battered

Über Member
sarahpink said:
sorry i really am a stereotypical female blonde,:girl:i have no clue with how to even put a chain back on. i want to learn and have enquired about any cycle matience course to go on , but i cant even pump wheels up, just don't have the strength!
Phew, steady on Sarah, you're a 23yo blonde, I'm surprised you haven't yet been trampled in the rush of men saying "pump your tyres up, of course I'm strong enough, well, it's not hard for me, no problem of course given my training regime but if y'norra natural athlete, y'know, I can understand..."

So hopefully nobody's going to be coming on all unnecessary anytime soon.:smile:

Brake blocks are straightforward to change, but let's start with pumping up the tyres (answer, get a track pump then you are just pushing down with both arms) and replacing a dropped chain (answer, with rubber gloves on if you have them, stand the bike upside down, push the (oily!)derailleur towards the front of the bike and then hook the now slack chain back on the gears)

Edin bike co-op do maintenance classes, failing that there may be a night class or similar. I'd say "ask on here if anyone here will teach you how to mend a bike" but you might find the pools of drool off-putting if all you want is to sort out your gearshift.xx(
 
OP
sarahpink

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
thanks everyone for the replies. went out on it yesterday, was very over cautiuos and think I worked out what I did wrong, when I do brake to stop lol I need to put my hands further down the brake leavers as have fairly ickle hands. so happy to get my bike back:biggrin:
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Yes, the further down the brake levers you go the more torque you could get. This is quite noticeable braking on the hoods (higher position) on my bike and then trying it on the drops - I know you're not supposed to brake on the hoods on many bikes!

I'd still say it's different to braking on a hybrid and you need to brake earlier and more times.

Have fun whilst the weather is good!
 
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