Builders boots

screenman

Legendary Member
During one winter a few years ago, I set up a hybrid with flat pedals on a turbo in the garage. One evening after lifting a few weights, I hopped onto the turbo. I’d forgotten to remove the ankle weights I was wearing; it’s surprising how much extra power you can generate on the downstroke with 10lbs of lead around your ankles!

Got it, you only wear the boot on the downward stroke.
 

Shortandcrisp

Über Member
Got it, you only wear the boot on the downward stroke.
But the extra power generated on the downstroke helps to pull you up on the upstroke. :rolleyes:
 

Landsurfer

Über Member
The problem with steel toe caps.
If an impact or crush is greater than 50Nm the steel toe cap can rotate and guillotine the toes off .... not as rare as you may think ... and steel toecaps around 3rd Rail is never a good idea ...
Look for nylon toe caps they tend to crush , which is repairable, rather than guillotine.. Toetectors are usually nylon.
My winter boots of choice where Karrimor KSB 2 walking boots, ideal for snowy circumnavigations of Scotland in March. Mine fell apart and they had stopped making them ...:sad:
 
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The problem with steel toe caps.
If an impact or crush is greater than 50Nm the steel toe cap can rotate and guillotine the toes off .... not as rare as you may think ... and steel toecaps around 3rd Rail is never a good idea ...
Look for nylon toe caps they tend to crush , which is repairable, rather than guillotine.. Toetectors are usually nylon.
My winter boots of choice where Karrimor KSB 2 walking boots, ideal for snowy circumnavigations of Scotland in March. Mine fell apart and they had stopped making them ...:sad:
The only live third rail I can think of outside of the UK is in Hamburg but I'm sure there are others. Fortunately I'm not working with anything of 50Nm weight: the most dangerous thing I have to deal with is a few stacked palettes.
If anything the steel soles are more important so I don't get a hole in my foot from discarded staples.
 

Slick

Guru
The only live third rail I can think of outside of the UK is in Hamburg but I'm sure there are others. Fortunately I'm not working with anything of 50Nm weight: the most dangerous thing I have to deal with is a few stacked palettes.
If anything the steel soles are more important so I don't get a hole in my foot from discarded staples.
50 nm isn't a weight, it's a force. Not like me to be so pedantic, sorry. :rolleyes:
 

Landsurfer

Über Member
25Kg @ 2g .... a mass doesn't have to fall far to accelerate that much .... Pedantic people rule ....... :smile: ( but of course we don't, not wishing to be pedantic ..) .... but i really shouldn't have used the word " fall" as the acceleration could be horizontal ..... ok ... forget it ... and mind your feet ...
 

Landsurfer

Über Member
" engineering or maths. "
It's the same subject ... not 2 subjects ....
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
The problem with steel toe caps.
If an impact or crush is greater than 50Nm the steel toe cap can rotate and guillotine the toes off .... not as rare as you may think ... and steel toecaps around 3rd Rail is never a good idea ...
Steel toes used to be banned in some motor mechanics for that reason. 1500kg of car really need not fall far to exceed 50Nm. Nylon still allowed AFAIK.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
Got it, you only wear the boot on the downward stroke.
There is a railway between Lynton and Lynmouth which uses weight loss to get up the hill and weight gain to get down. While one carriage goes down the hill, the other carriage gets pulled up.

The same system could be used on a bike by filling the frame and tyres with water at the peak of each hill so that the extra weight adds momentum down hill.

At the trough of the down hill section, the water is released making the bike lighter and propelling it up to the next peak.
 
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