Builders boots

gasinayr

Senior Member
Location
Ayr Scotland
Used to wear walking boots all the time on my mountain bike, had large toeclips that the boot fitted into. On wet and snowy conditions I wore walking gaiters with my boots kept feet and lower legs dry and warm, still wear them sometimes.
 
I've cycled in my ankle high walking boots, I already owned them so no further outlay and they are nice and toasty and waterproof. Ideal for commuting, probably not so much for long sporting rides, but good enough for slower riders.
 

Tripster

Über Member
Location
North West
I wouldn’t fancy my work boots on bike. Agree it’s not necessary for all the gear and great to just grab and go but I prefer a lighter shoe.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
I wouldn’t fancy my work boots on bike. Agree it’s not necessary for all the gear and great to just grab and go but I prefer a lighter shoe.
In my case, I don't wear the old work boots I cycle to work in at work. I have a decent pair waiting under my desk to change into.

The main advantages with old workboots are the durability, resistance to water and the room inside them for an extra pair of socks on a cold day.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
The main advantages with old workboots are the durability, resistance to water and the room inside them for an extra pair of socks on a cold day.
I wear them for the same reasons when buggering about on a MTB. My most recent work boots get worn at work. The old shite pairs that have previously been condemned because the toecaps are all scuffed and are in a right state, are still perfectly functional for riding a bike, doing car repairs, or general outdoor household jobs in. By the time they start to fall apart, I'll have yet another scuffed up working pair ready to replace them with. Nothing I own ever gets binned until it's useful life has been completely exhausted.
 

AuroraSaab

Senior Member
Screwfix do some decent safety boots and trainers. I have some of the steel toe capped trainers for doing the garden and restoring my car. They can be surprisingly cheap. OH has a pair of the smarter safety shoes as he has a very long walk to the station and they are non slip and don't wear out quickly, though they are heavier than normal smart shoes obviously.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I bought some Portwest safety shoes (not boots) off an eBay supplier about four years ago. They were just under twelve quid delivered. I wasn't expecting much at that price but I was pleasantly surprised. They are really comfortable, good for bad weather, and still get used now.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
I wear them for the same reasons when buggering about on a MTB. My most recent work boots get worn at work.
My ones are work supplied as well. I am issued with a few pairs per year up to a certain value. I can have whatever I choose so long as it's rated as a safety boot.

At work, I'm still wearing the pair I got three years ago and the rest are at home.

The pair I use on the bike are proper leather upper and rubber sole steel toe capped work boots. Pretty much waterproof and perfect on the flat pedals of an MTB. They have a fair bit of room in them for a double layer of socks which saved my toes last week when it was minus 4c.
 

Tilley

Senior Member
Location
Bristol
If you have work boots which have a steel midshank as well as a steel toe cap you can cut into the sole and drill the midsole to accept sod cleats. They work a treat.
 
Steel toecap boots, what kind of a social worker are you?
A fair question.

In German I'm an Arbeitserzieher, which is a cross between a social worker and an occupational therapist in the UK. Germany has networks of workshops for people with disabilities, and I work in one for people with Psychological disabilities as a sort of supervisor, and one of my departments is a wood workshop. Hence the need for work boots.
 
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