Cambridge cyclists to face course or fine if they break law

classic33

Legendary Member
A 'Cycling Discretionary Scheme' may be introduced in Cambridge for dangerous cyclists

Cyclists in Cambridge who flout the law could face the option of taking a ‘corrective’ course or be fined under a new scheme aimed at educating dangerous riders.

A ‘Cycling Discretionary Scheme’ would see those cyclists who get caught riding without lights at night, jumping red lights or riding on pavements faced with either completing an online course or be fined, reports the Cambridge News. This is in line with similar penalties faced by motorists.

Sergeant Ian Wood of Cambridge’s neighbourhood policing team said: “These diversionary schemes are focussed on educating road users, rather than being overly-punitive however, they are only offered under stringent circumstances.

“Similarly, as the system is now more automated we are able to highlight repeat offenders and hold them to account, in a bid to improve road safety across the city. Personally, I wholeheartedly welcome this scheme.”

Those taking the hour-long online course would pay a fee, rather than be fined.

“The main objective of this course will be to provide education, to change cycling behaviour and ultimately to reduce casualties on the road and to enable all road users to share the roads safely together,” said Finola Carey, Cambridgeshire police service’s casualty reduction officer.

No date has yet been set on when the course may be introduced.
 

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
Will motorists who overtake too closely, perform left-hooks, tailgate cyclists, etc. also be given the same treatment? In other words, where's the 'Motoring Discretionary Scheme'? Personally, I think motorists need this more, because they're the ones driving the dangerous vehicles.
 

Crankarm

Legendary Member
Location
Nr Cambridge
A 'Cycling Discretionary Scheme' may be introduced in Cambridge for dangerous cyclists

Cyclists in Cambridge who flout the law could face the option of taking a ‘corrective’ course or be fined under a new scheme aimed at educating dangerous riders.

A ‘Cycling Discretionary Scheme’ would see those cyclists who get caught riding without lights at night, jumping red lights or riding on pavements faced with either completing an online course or be fined, reports the Cambridge News. This is in line with similar penalties faced by motorists.

Sergeant Ian Wood of Cambridge’s neighbourhood policing team said: “These diversionary schemes are focussed on educating road users, rather than being overly-punitive however, they are only offered under stringent circumstances.

“Similarly, as the system is now more automated we are able to highlight repeat offenders and hold them to account, in a bid to improve road safety across the city. Personally, I wholeheartedly welcome this scheme.”

Those taking the hour-long online course would pay a fee, rather than be fined.

“The main objective of this course will be to provide education, to change cycling behaviour and ultimately to reduce casualties on the road and to enable all road users to share the roads safely together,” said Finola Carey, Cambridgeshire police service’s casualty reduction officer.

No date has yet been set on when the course may be introduced.
I hope plod stands on Bridge and Sidney Streets nabbing the firkin' nobbers who insist on riding up that road the wrong way against the flow of traffic as it's a one way street or on the adjacent pavement causing peds to scatter. I'd fine them £1,000 each or give them 14 days in jail if they refused or were unable to pay up. Also the same for all the nobbers in Cambridge who ride without lights and there are an awful lot of them.
 
OP
classic33

classic33

Legendary Member
Will motorists who overtake too closely, perform left-hooks, tailgate cyclists, etc. also be given the same treatment? In other words, where's the 'Motoring Discretionary Scheme'? Personally, I think motorists need this more, because they're the ones driving the dangerous vehicles.
They appear to be trying to bring cyclists into line, traffic wise, with motor vehicles. This includes the riders. Whether that will help us, as cyclists, or not remains to be seen.
Maybe just an as yet un-tapped source of income for them!
 

Arrowfoot

Veteran
I am more intrigued about how they can came to devise such a scheme - those can afford it pay a fine and those who can't afford the fine spend an hour. Maybe they should have a 3rd option for those who can't afford both the fine and the hour - maybe a self-criticism posted on facebook or twitter.

And we pay these guys with our taxes. Maybe we should introduce a scheme for the plods on the meaning of "flawed" and "wholeheartedly" and logic.
 
Will motorists who overtake too closely, perform left-hooks, tailgate cyclists, etc. also be given the same treatment? In other words, where's the 'Motoring Discretionary Scheme'? Personally, I think motorists need this more, because they're the ones driving the dangerous vehicles.
Technically that scheme is already in existence and has been for some time, as for most driving offences of the "careless or inconsiderate" nature the driver can be offered a Driver Improvement Course as an alternative to prosecution - exactly the same thing, pay a fee and turn up for a course or or for a court appearance or fine instead.
 

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
Technically that scheme is already in existence and has been for some time, as for most driving offences of the "careless or inconsiderate" nature the driver can be offered a Driver Improvement Course as an alternative to prosecution - exactly the same thing, pay a fee and turn up for a course or or for a court appearance or fine instead.
Agreed, and Australia I think has something similar. But it generally doesn't make the news. Personally, I think the media in Australia are very biased against cyclists, although they'd strenuously deny it. This reflects a general anti-cyclist prejudice held by a significant proportion of people here. I can't comment on the UK, though, but I get the impression from reading CC posts that it's pretty similar.
 

sidevalve

Über Member
Will motorists who overtake too closely, perform left-hooks, tailgate cyclists, etc. also be given the same treatment? In other words, where's the 'Motoring Discretionary Scheme'? Personally, I think motorists need this more, because they're the ones driving the dangerous vehicles.
Ahh - the usual 'oh it's always somebody else's fault and let us off 'cos we're only cyclists'. Don't complain about others breaking the rules if you want to excuse yourself doing it. The laws go BOTH ways or they don't go either way. Stop crying.
 
Ahh - the usual 'oh it's always somebody else's fault and let us off 'cos we're only cyclists'. Don't complain about others breaking the rules if you want to excuse yourself doing it. The laws go BOTH ways or they don't go either way. Stop crying.
The police only have a finite amount of resources. If that weren't the case I'd agree.

So, if they can spare a team for the day the best use of those tesources is to either stop dangerous cyclist and maybe prevent a future scratched knee. Or stop dangerous car drivers and maybe prevent a future serious injury or death

As a tax payer I know which I'd find a better use of resources.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Ahh - the usual 'oh it's always somebody else's fault and let us off 'cos we're only cyclists'. Don't complain about others breaking the rules if you want to excuse yourself doing it. The laws go BOTH ways or they don't go either way. Stop crying.
No, it's the usual "who's the bigger killer here?" If they want to reduce road casualties, focusing on cycles is not going to achieve much. Nationally, the cyclist actions which are most common in injury collisions (riding too close to door, entering major road and so on) are legal but inadvisable. Is it different in Cambridge?
 

mythste

Veteran
Location
Manchester
It's easy to forget that for every confident and educated road cyclist - Most of us here I would have thought, there is probably 10+ who have grown up jumping off curbs on cheap full sussers bombing round to mates houses.

one of the above groups is dangerous, the other just moans a lot ^_^
 

Stephen C

Über Member
Probably, Oxford and Cambridge have a reputation for being particularly chaotic when it comes to cycles. I believe it's the very large number of students.
Certainly in Cambridge, there are a lot riding without lights, or with rubbish lights, and you also get a lot on international students that don't have any idea about how to cycle on UK roads.
 
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