Clincher tyres on tubeless wheels

Rooster1

I was right about that saddle
I will probably change the tubeless tyres on the Giant SR2 disc wheels.

I just want to run clinchers! The Giant tubeless video demonstrates a three step sequence to do precisely that.

I know its controversial but anyways.

Tubeless is entirely new to me and I don't wan't to get stuck in the middle of knowwhere with goo coming out my tyre and no idea how to resolve it.
 
I'm with you. You know where you are with a ninner tube.
 

mgs315

Senior Member
I have SR2s on my TCR with GP4000 S IIs on them, they’re pretty easy to fit. Definitely don’t need levers and only took 5 mins a wheel. I’d feel confident fixing them in the middle of winter in freezing rain.

I switched after I got a puncture I couldn’t sort with worms so decided to forget the whole tubeless thing for now.

Grippier than the Gavias mounted as standard too. Haven’t really noticed a difference in rolling resistance.

I say do it.
 
My bike came with inner tubes on tubeless ready rims.

When I had a puncture, I had a problem releasing the tyre bead because it was such a tight fit on the rim - good if you are running tubeless, bad if you need to change an inner tube.

The second puncture took me more than an hour to change beside a road a long way from home in North Yorkshire.

At one point, I thought I was going to have to admit defeat.

If you change, the tyre will pop onto the bead easily enough when you inflate the tube, but I would recommend deflating the tyre to check if you can get the bead to release easily.
 

Lee_M

Veteran
I did this after being stranded with a non sealing tubeless that I couldnt get the valve off, and then having a second tubeless fail within a week.

Not been stranded since, have to use levers to get the tyre off, but can replace with thumb power alone
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
The challenge with tubeless is reseating the bead at the side of the road. Make that a cinch and I can see they would be much more widely adopted.
 
After running a tubeless disc last season and being very pleased with the results I tried it on the road bike. Ok at first but then I made the mistake of using Finishline sealant, it was a disaster. Fortunately though when I had that messy roadside repair I had support and put a tube in. That tube has been replaced a few times (unscheduled deflation's :rolleyes:) but as Mickle says you know where you are with a clincher. The back still has tubeless but over winter I've put wheels on with clinchers. I don't fancy being messy and faffing about in the middle of winter. A tube maybe fails more often but there less faffing about.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Im the opposite, love tubeless . Its saved me so many times from thorn, flint punctures. ive had some close major failures which could of been very serious if I was on a inner-tubed tyre setup . The slow deflation with tubeless stopped a high speed crash.
 

Lloss

Active Member
Im the opposite, love tubeless . Its saved me so many times from thorn, flint punctures. ive had some close major failures which could of been very serious if I was on a inner-tubed tyre setup . The slow deflation with tubeless stopped a high speed crash.
How do know it has saved you from thorns etc ?
 

Will Spin

Senior Member
I'm ambivalent about tubeless. I tried them for about 18 months and decided that there was far too much faffing about required so I've now put Durano plusses on my 2 winter bikes. As mentioned before, with normal tubed clincher tyres can be difficult to get on and off tubeless rims. When taking them off the trick is to push the tyre bead well into the centre of the rim all the way round and on both sides of the tyre before using tyre levers. A similar procedure is required to get the tyre back on. I cannot get the durano plusses back on without using tyre levers for the last bit (Mavic rims).
 
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YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
I'm ambivalent about tubeless. I tried them for about 18 months and decided that there was far too much faffing about required so I've now put Durano plusses on my 2 winter bikes. As mentioned before, with normal tubed clincher tyres can be difficult to get on and off tubeless rims. When taking them off the trick is to push the tyre bead well into the centre of the rim all the way round and on both sides of the tyre before using tyre levers. A similar procedure is required to get the tyre back on. I cannot get the durano plusses back on without using tyre levers for the last bit (Mavic rims).
Durano plus are a bugger to fit and remove. Well that's been my experience. Also somewhat wooden ride.
 
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