Disc Brakes or Rim

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Great feedback , thanks , dare I mention Giant conduct Hydraulic brakes, the bulkhead on the handlebars make it look a mess, but I’m guessing they are the same performance as they are 105 or Ultegra,anyone got views on giants fugly looking system slapped in the middle of the bars ,
Don't like it, would definitely avoid.
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
TRP Spyre discs. Cable actuated. Best thing. For long distance (audax) and touring these rock.

Anyone who recommends hydraulic for anything other than club rides, trail centre stuff or leisure riding probably still lives with their mum. She’ll come and pick you up when it all goes wrong because they aren’t easily fixed in the field. :okay:
Im still on the stock discs and pads on a 4yr old winter bike that became my #1

What is this "fixed in the field"? :ohmy: I spent more time changing rim pads and wheels than I ever have fixing hydro disc systems
 
Location
London
What is this "fixed in the field"? :ohmy: I spent more time changing rim pads and wheels than I ever have fixing hydro disc systems
It's when something goes wrong/needs fixing. It's why i would never use hydraulics on a tourer. Ditto i wouldn't use on an everyday commuter if you didn't have another bike or other means of transport.
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
It's when something goes wrong/needs fixing. It's why i would never use hydraulics on a tourer. Ditto i wouldn't use on an everyday commuter if you didn't have another bike or other means of transport.
Not quite what I was getting at. :tongue:. Some have this notion that hydro/disc systems require more fettling and are troublesome to fix away from home, I'm just saying IME that's far from the case.
 
Only ever rim brakes on a road bike for me personally. Discs are for MTBs and derived MTB type hybrids. The disadvantages of disc brakes on a road bike far outweigh any advantages, unless you have very pricey rims, then there is an argument for disc brakes on a road bike.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
I've recently bought another bike with direct mount rim brakes - it was priced such that I couldn't not buy it and I really like it, boatloads of fun to ride. That being said the difference between excellent rim brakes and good cable discs is huge and the discs are significantly more consistent in all weather. Like you I'm a larger rider and I really notice the stopping power of the disc brakes.



I've worn through a set of rims once commuting in all weathers but it's definitely not the norm. I've replaced more disc brake rims as a result of impacts on the wheel than I have rims due to wear. Unless you're riding thousands of miles annually on a single wheelset in terrible conditions it's not likely to be something significant to worry about.
I've yet to find any disc brakes as fierce as the rim brakes on my Felt, and that includes my own stable of XTR, STX and Hope M4 equipped bikes.

I have spoken on these hallowed pages before about how they appear to be fairly conventional dual pivot calipers. I suspect they may be Tektro, but they're unbranded so I can't confirm that. Whatever, the power is astonishing, more braking that i can use in any weather. I emailed Felt to ask what make the cartridge pads are so I can get some more. They responded, asking for my full name and address, and a few weeks later 2 full sets arrived in the post, absolutely gratis. I still don't know what make they are though :laugh:

The olde worlde centrepulls on my Claud are on Clark pads and again, can lifr the rear wheel, some clearly capable of providing more stopping power than the bike can transmit to the ground. Discs might provide even more power still, but seeing as I've already exceeded the rest of the vehicles ability to handle braking power it would be a pointless endeavour.

I'd certainly look at discs first, but as aforementioned it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me. Most people do it for the willy wagging rights when boasting in the lounge bar of the Goat and Vasectomy, but won't admit it :laugh:

For the time being, wet or dry, the Felt has genuinely astonishing brakes. My fear is that one day I'll be fickle and replace it with something of a more modern design with discs that doesn't stop as well. The only thing I really wish I could lose is that thin film of black dirt they create.

I've never had to replace a rim for any reason other than vandalism, but being an MTB instructor I know how to read the ground ahead and ride light on the contact points, and that carries through to my tarmac riding.

The other downer I hear is people complaining that rim brakes, particularly cantis, can be difficult to set up. Like anything else it's a skill, and if you have it then it's easy. Conversely, when something failed internally on one of the master cylinders of one of my previous bikes with Deore hydros I'd have given my left nut at that exact moment for a cable and barrel adjuster.

You take the rough with the smooth, and of my 3 disc'd bikes and 5 rim brakes bikes they all have rough to go with the smooth. The only thing that matters is where your personal needle sits on the scale of compromise that suits you best, and that's not only different for everyone but liable to differ bike by bike as well.

Which brings me back to the OP. Go try some bikes. Theres a decent chance that discs will do it, bbutthe bike that tugs your rug has rim brakes and stops ok then don't sweat it. The only people that will notice are the self appointed brake system police, and no one cares what they think anyway.
 
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MichaelW2

Veteran
I've yet to find any disc brakes as fierce as the rim brakes on my Felt, and that includes my own stable of XTR, STX and Hope M4 equipped bikes.

I have spoken on these hallowed pages before about how they appear to be fairly conventional dual pivot calipers. I suspect they may be Tektro, but they're unbranded so I can't confirm that. Whatever, the power is astonishing, more braking that i can use in any weather. I emailed Felt to ask what make the cartridge pads are so I can get some more. They responded, asking for my full name and address, and a few weeks later 2 full sets arrived in the post, absolutely gratis. I still don't know what make they are though :laugh:

The olde worlde centrepulls on my Claud are on Clark pads and again, can lifr the rear wheel, some clearly capable of providing more stopping power than the bike can transmit to the ground. Discs might provide even more power still, but seeing as I've already exceeded the rest of the vehicles ability to handle braking power it would be a pointless endeavour.

I'd certainly look at discs first, but as aforementioned it wouldn't be a deal breaker for me. Most people do it for the willy wagging rights when boasting in the lounge bar of the Goat and Vasectomy, but won't admit it :laugh:

For the time being, wet or dry, the Felt has genuinely astonishing brakes. My fear is that one day I'll be fickle and replace it with something of a more modern design with discs that doesn't stop as well. The only thing I really wish I could lose is that thin film of black dirt they create.

I've never had to replace a rim for any reason other than vandalism, but being an MTB instructor I know how to read the ground ahead and ride light on the contact points, and that carries through to my tarmac riding.

The other downer I hear is people complaining that rim brakes, particularly cantis, can be difficult to set up. Like anything else it's a skill, and if you have it then it's easy. Conversely, when something failed internally on one of the master cylinders of one of my previous bikes with Deore hydros I'd have given my left nut at that exact moment for a cable and barrel adjuster.

You take the rough with the smooth, and of my 3 disc'd bikes and 5 rim brakes bikes they all have rough to go with the smooth. The only thing that matters is where your personal needle sits on the scale of compromise that suits you best, and that's not only different for everyone but liable to differ bike by bike as well.

Which brings me back to the OP. Go try some bikes. Theres a decent chance that discs will do it, bbutthe bike that tugs your rug has rim brakes and stops ok then don't sweat it. The only people that will notice are the self appointed brake system police, and no one cares what they think anyway.
I have had no end of trouble settings up cantilever brakes on my touring bike. I have followed instructions for the length of cross wire etc but they are always mushy and weak and doing loaded descents is tricky.
 
What would you consider the disadvantages of disc brakes on road bikes out of interest?
As far as disc brakes on road bikes go. Relative cost ( parts and hardware ) complexity, weight, the fact they are an absolute liability in a mixed ability group, especially in bad conditions, the relative difficulty in having to replace pads, should you manage to finish a set, whilst out and about. It’s far easier to stick a new set of cartridge pads in the callipers of a rim brake, than replacing a set of ( particularly hydraulic ) disc pads, where you have to push back the pistons, and ( nearly always ) reset the position of the callipers, which is a massive faff, if it’s cold dark and wet. I ride an unusually ( for a leisure rider ) number of miles, in all sorts of conditions, and I’ve had brake issues, which were far more of a pain to sort out on disc braked bikes.
 

bridgy

Guru
Location
Cheddar
As far as disc brakes on road bikes go. Relative cost ( parts and hardware ) complexity, weight, the fact they are an absolute liability in a mixed ability group, especially in bad conditions, the relative difficulty in having to replace pads, should you manage to finish a set, whilst out and about. It’s far easier to stick a new set of cartridge pads in the callipers of a rim brake, than replacing a set of ( particularly hydraulic ) disc pads, where you have to push back the pistons, and ( nearly always ) reset the position of the callipers, which is a massive faff, if it’s cold dark and wet. I ride an unusually ( for a leisure rider ) number of miles, in all sorts of conditions, and I’ve had brake issues, which were far more of a pain to sort out on disc braked bikes.
Thanks. I think its a "horses for courses" thing like many others, when it comes to component choices on bikes.

I do obviously agree with you that disc brake bikes do usually cost a little more up front than their equivalent rim brake versions and weigh a little more too. The up front cost would have to be weighed up long term with the higher relative cost of having to replace a wheelset with worn rims vs replacing a pair of worn disc rotors though. Apart from that I can't really relate to the other disadvantages you find with them.

I don't find changing disc pads, or adjusting alignment, significantly more faff than on some caliper brakes to be honest (I have both), but I must say, I've never had to replace any type of brake pads whilst out and about mid-ride on either a mountain bike or road ride - I would tend to check them before going out, or before going away if going on a longer trip.

Personally the only disadvantage I can relate to is the up-front cost and weight penalty, but I have found the overall braking performance so much better, that the confidence of better braking in all conditions far outweighs these disadvantages.

Like yours, just personal opinions though based on my own experiences
 
TRP Spyre discs. Cable actuated. Best thing. For long distance (audax) and touring these rock.

Anyone who recommends hydraulic for anything other than club rides, trail centre stuff or leisure riding probably still lives with their mum. She’ll come and pick you up when it all goes wrong because they aren’t easily fixed in the field. :okay:
Quite right.
 
Thanks. I think its a "horses for courses" thing like many others, when it comes to component choices on bikes.

I do obviously agree with you that disc brake bikes do usually cost a little more up front than their equivalent rim brake versions and weigh a little more too. The up front cost would have to be weighed up long term with the higher relative cost of having to replace a wheelset with worn rims vs replacing a pair of worn disc rotors though. Apart from that I can't really relate to the other disadvantages you find with them.

I don't find changing disc pads, or adjusting alignment, significantly more faff than on some caliper brakes to be honest (I have both), but I must say, I've never had to replace any type of brake pads whilst out and about mid-ride on either a mountain bike or road ride - I would tend to check them before going out, or before going away if going on a longer trip.

Personally the only disadvantage I can relate to is the up-front cost and weight penalty, but I have found the overall braking performance so much better, that the confidence of better braking in all conditions far outweighs these disadvantages.

Like yours, just personal opinions though based on my own experiences
Obviously you’ve never shot through a set of disc pads, part way through a ride ( easily done, if you have a set of long technical descents ). You really wouldn’t want the hassle involved in sorting them out, if it was cold wet and dark.
 
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