Disc Brakes or Rim

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Worn through a nearly new pair on a single ride in the Dolomites on a rental MTB which was fun as the other brake proceeded to boil the mineral oil. Was halfway down a very steep and technical descent from 1200m-ish to 300m-ish.
 

Kajjal

Veteran
Location
Wheely World
Has anyone actually shot through a set of disc pads on a long technical descent? Brand new pads worn to the backing plate??

I haven't worn through a set in 4years +months :laugh::laugh::laugh:
I am 100KG+ bronzed mountain biking Adonis and have never done that before even on mountain descents. I do make the rotors smell of burning on longer downhills slowing down so mere mortals can catch me up :whistle:

The main drawback of disc brakes is if they get contaminated with oil or similar and then the performance goes to pieces and they honk like a turkey :thumbsdown:
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
I am 100KG+ bronzed mountain biking Adonis and have never done that before even on mountain descents. I do make the rotors smell of burning on longer downhills slowing down so mere mortals can catch me up :whistle:

The main drawback of disc brakes is if they get contaminated with oil or similar and then the performance goes to pieces and they honk like a turkey :thumbsdown:
Rim brakes and oil don't mix too well either.

Disc brakes are absolutely essential on recumbents, especially if riding with road bikes which are so damn slow in comparison that you're constantly on the brakes.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
I have worn disc pads down to the metal on a number of occasions with 'huge' consequences so please all be warned!
You are likely to experience several days or even weeks of slightly annoying scraping and mild dragging noises before you discover your neglect (they are so damn reliable you just get out of the habit of checking them).
You will not notice any loss in braking performance as you wear through the friction material to the metal backing plate.
The sudden onset of these symptoms will catch you unexpectedly during the hundred or two miles they take to manifest and you will rail at the unfairness of a brake pad that only lasts 4-5 thousand trouble free miles!
The injustice of a brake pad that can wear to the metal but fail to gouge or wreck the braking surface will be insufferable.
You will moan when the installation of your ridiculously expensive (or cheap) pads makes little or no improvement to the performance of your perfectly adequate and functional braking system.
Trust me folks, disc brakes are the work of the devil and have no place on any sane persons bike. You are much better off with the weather dependent inconsistencies of rim brakes. Only a fool (or clued up non-luddite) would risk trusting their trip to disc brakes......
 

Grant Fondo

Riding backwards into the future
Location
Cheshire
You can only speak from experience, here's mine:
Shimano Altus cantilevers - dreadful
Tiagra rim- fine
Ultegra rim - good
Ultegra discs - fantastic
105 discs - fantastic
Never had mech discs so can't comment
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
Discs on road bikes are fugly. :laugh:
Correction, disc brakes on bikes are fugly full stop. Disc road = fugly. Disc hybid = fugly. Disc MTB = fugly. Doesn't matter what sort of bike it is, they are a complete eyesore regardless.

I've never owned a bike with disc brakes.... what you've never had you dont miss. I'm waiting for Skipdivers view on disc brakes, i bet he isn't a fan :laugh:
Needless to say, I'm not a fan of discs. Aside from the fact they look absolutely minging, I just don't see the point of them. I've never found any problem stopping using rim brakes, and in many situations the braking retardation available even from caliper rim brakes, exceeds the grip of the tyres anyway. Once you get to the point of locking a wheel, any extra available braking force is simply superfluous.
Oooh, look, I can put myself right over the bars with my super hydraulic discs using only one finger on the lever. What a load of complete cobblers.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Needless to say, I'm not a fan of discs. Aside from the fact they look absolutely minging, I just don't see the point of them. I've never found any problem stopping using rim brakes, and in many situations the braking retardation available even from caliper rim brakes, exceeds the grip of the tyres anyway. Once you get to the point of locking a wheel, any extra available braking force is simply superfluous.
Oooh, look, I can put myself right over the bars with my super hydraulic discs using only one finger on the lever. What a load of complete cobblers.
There's too much wrong with this to even begin.
 
I like Shimano flat bar hydraulics, although the XTs on my most recent bike have not been faultless.

The rear calliper seized solid after about 2,500 miles - replacement was £50 fitted.

The front rubs occasionally, despite the bike having a thru-axle.
 

Vantage

The dogs chew toy
There's too much wrong with this to even begin.
He's not far wrong though...and I speak as a disc brake user.
They are effing fugly in the extreme.
I've done my best to get my own bike looking as graceful and elegant as I can without spending silly money and for the most part, in my opinion anyway, I've succeeded. But those rotors...feck me! They're an abomination.
They do serve a purpose though. I lost a s**t load of hand strength through a stroke and compared to my best attempts at braking power through cantis and vbrakes, I can now stop the bike quickly and dragging the brakes constantly while out with the doggie doesn't eat my rims.
 

DCBassman

Veteran
Location
Ten Forward
First off, I don't commute, so not out in all weathers.
Second, never tried discs anyhow. Calipers on my road bike are adequate, v-brakes on mtb astoundingly powerful by comparison. I would love to improve the roadie's braking.
But if I had to cycle more generally, I'd be riding something with TRP Spyres. I see no overall advantage to the complication of hydraulic systems.
If it's not fixable by the roadside, it's a potential liability.
 
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