Feeding the puncture fairy

Discussion in 'Recumbents, Trikes and HPVs' started by DaddyPaddey, 2 Jun 2018.

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  1. DaddyPaddey

    DaddyPaddey Active Member

    Location:
    Fareham
    Riding the Scorpion down a country lane last Wednesday we met a Range Rover who was determined not to get the slightest bit of grass [let alone mud] on his tyres. As there was not room I was forced off the road into a stony farm entrance whilst the RRover swept by without acknowledgment. Approximately 50 mtrs down the road one of my front tyres had deflated.

    We couldn’t find the cause of the flat [not helped by having forgotten ones glasses] so put in fresh tube. Pump up, put everything away to discover another flat. Wheel off, more hunting for something in the tyre, without success, tube no 2 in, pump up and go 5 yds to another flat. Wheel off, use friends spare tube [he was riding a Moulton with 20” wheels], but this time success.

    We decided to abort the ride as we only had one spare tube left between us and back we went, only as we turned into the car park for the other front to go flat. Getting grumpy now, so Scorpion in car and drive home to discover when boot opened the original tyre had now gone flat as well, making a total of five flats!

    I carefully inspected both tyres and found a number of small stones embedded, some needing a magnifying glass to see. So it was a pair of less than a year old Marathon Racers in the bin. MORAL stick to the trusty Marathon Plus’ when riding the narrow lanes of Hampshire.
     
    Racing roadkill likes this.
  2. byegad

    byegad Guru

    Location:
    NE England
    Sorry you have had such a bad experience of M-racers. I had them on my Catrike for 5k miles or so, and only two punctures. The second one ended my using them as they'd got very bald looking. I'm now on Trikers, more when I've got a few miles on them.
     
  3. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    Has anyone tried solid tyres on a recumbent? I'm tempted as my 20" fronts are a pig to remove.
     
  4. flake99please

    flake99please Make mine a '99'

    Location:
    Edinburgh
    I wouldn’t risk solid tyres on a trike. The lateral forces are far greater.
     
    raleighnut likes this.
  5. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    I did think about that, which is why I wondered if anyone had tried it. 20" tubulars are another thing I've thought of, needing a new rim obviously.
     
  6. Bad Machine

    Bad Machine In the garage .....

    Location:
    East Anglia
    Sounds like what I've had to deal with here in Suffolk - small, sharp flints work their way through the tyre over time - when new, no problems with deflating tyres for ages, then suddenly you seem not to ride 50 yards before you get another flat. I changed to Marathon Plus on one bike, with good results. On the other, I've been trying tyre liners with my "ordinary" Schwalbe tyres - the liners are really thick (well, 2-3mm) strips of hard poly-something that are placed between the inner tube and the inner side of the tyre carcass. Difficult to get into the right place initially, as they arrived in a very tight coil. I've tried getting them into approximately the right place, inflating the inner tube and leaving for a couple of days, then deflating and re-siting the liners to exactly the right place now that they've taken on the rough shape of the tyre. Seems to work as good as the Marathon Plus, and both bikes have remained flat-free (apart from one flat caused by a weld fail at the base of the valve stem). No major drop in ride comfort, I'd argue. I read that Marathon Plus are not as energy-sapping as some "p-resistant" designs, so I'll stick with them, despite their premium price.

    Courtesy of a late night alcohol-enhanced fleabay session, and an inquisitive mind, I do have a pair of solid tyres ready to fit - but have held back as user comments have cited the huge drop in ride quality when moving to them from pneumatic tyres - I can understand that solid tyres are unable to "dissipate" the shock of riding over a bump in the road surface in the same way penumatic tyres have the whole inner tube volume to share the air compression that occurs. I keep them ready to experiment when the trailer is completed.
     
  7. I had pretty much the same problem yesterday. The front went first, and it was a truly tiny flint that did it, the second one was the rear, and it was a huge thorn, that really wasn’t hard to find at all, back lanes of Hampshire and Dorset, exacerbated by a vankenpanzer driver, who didn’t understand the whole ‘drive on the left’ thing.
     
  8. byegad

    byegad Guru

    Location:
    NE England
    The greatest issue will be vibration. Having spoken to users and read about other users experience, vibration, then lack of grip on rough surfaces are the issues. Perhaps, one day, someone will solve these problems but the reason pneumatic tyres took over from solid and still remain in use is, despite all of the problems.

    I'd suggest trying easier to fit tyres. I've found Big Apples, pumped close to the maximum 70psi, are pretty fast, pretty durable and very easy to fit. I can take off and replace them by hand, using only one tyre lever to start removal.
     
    classic33 likes this.
  9. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Über Member

    Location:
    London
    My experience of Delta Cruiser+ has been positive so far; no unwelcome visits from the Fairy - but the road debris I encounter is mostly small fragments of shattered car windscreen glass rather than thorns. Reading this thread has reminded me I really need to check mine again for anything stuck in the tread before it causes a p*ncture. especially as I'm doing a 22 mile round trip later on today. It's easy to get lazy and not bother doing a visual check every day you ride.
     
  10. 2525869B-3E4A-4147-95FE-B98B46CC0D1E.jpeg

    They are no worse than a pneumatic tyre pumped up to the ‘virtual pressure’ of the Airless tyres ( they’re not solid ). I’ve ridden with them over tens of thousands of miles. Including this ride.

    https://www.relive.cc/view/1564535452

    https://www.relive.cc/view/1567309631

    https://www.relive.cc/view/1569274417






    And one very similar to it last year.

    Ignore all the manure you will hear from people with little or no experience of the Airless tyres, once you’re used to the ( not very many / not very serious ) foibles / quirks, they are worth their weight in gold.
     
    Last edited: 3 Jun 2018
  11. Bad Machine

    Bad Machine In the garage .....

    Location:
    East Anglia
    Whilst your praise for them is uncommon (there have been a lot of negative comments from those who do have experience of them), you don't say if you were on two "solid" wheels, or three ? I hope the most recent designs are lighter than those I bought - heavy on the wheel and on the pocket.

    On a more positive tack, it wasn't expensive (£8.95 + del. at Amazon)to buy the tyre liners - I've got similar to this Zefal Z Liner tape https://www.amazon.co.uk/Zefal-Z-Liner-Puncture-Prevention-Tape/dp/B00BQL25KA but specced for a 20"/406 and even still, I had to trim it to fit in the 20" tyres I use. If you fit it and let the excess length overlap, the tyre will squeak as you ride. However, whilst deflating the tyre 24 hours later (with the aim of trimming off overlap), I found the overlap position had been indented into the liner, so careful cutting with a craft knife (then a bit of sanding to smooth the cut edge) produced a perfect length/fit for the tyres (Schwalbe Cruiser IIRC). Low cost and simple, and can be re-used when a worn tyre needs replacing.
     
    Last edited: 3 Jun 2018
  12. On Two and three wheels, everything from a Brompton to an ice Trike. I’ll guarantee I’ve got a load more experience of the tyres than just about anyone I know. It’s each to their own, and I’ll admit they aren’t to everyone’s taste ( not much is ). But I see so much crap written about them, based on ( seemingly ) very little, it makes me howl with laughter.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    DaddyPaddey

    DaddyPaddey Active Member

    Location:
    Fareham
    Interestingly I need a tool to get the M+'s on my 700c Upwrong, yet can do it with finger pressure on the Scorpion 20" ers without a problem.
     
  14. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Über Member

    Location:
    London
    I'm curious to know what the tyres are on the Boris Bikes. I see the things virtually every day, but I've never ridden one. Initially I thought they were probably M+, from their looks, but on the last one I looked at I couldn't see any air valve.
     
  15. Airless tyres in a 37mm fit.
     
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