Gearing up for the winter

plastic_cyclist

Well-Known Member
Location
Angus
Okay, so I've been aiming to ride my Giant TCR about 3 times per week circa 25 miles and a biggish ride at the weekend, trying to amass 100 miles/week. the only really window of opportunity for me to get these mid-week rides chalked off and out the way is 6am starts.

It's all okay at the minute as I have the clocks on my side, but once them dreaded clocks go back, then I will find myself in the abyss come 6am.

Does anyone else ride regularly in the early morning darkness ? and the LBS guy said I should retire the Giant to the garage from October through to April - so the Tricross will come back from the dead!
 

cougie uk

Über Member
Just easier using a turbo in the evening.

Once you've put your layers on and checked your lights - you could be half way through a decent turbo workout.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Okay, so I've been aiming to ride my Giant TCR about 3 times per week circa 25 miles and a biggish ride at the weekend, trying to amass 100 miles/week. the only really window of opportunity for me to get these mid-week rides chalked off and out the way is 6am starts.

It's all okay at the minute as I have the clocks on my side, but once them dreaded clocks go back, then I will find myself in the abyss come 6am.

Does anyone else ride regularly in the early morning darkness ? and the LBS guy said I should retire the Giant to the garage from October through to April - so the Tricross will come back from the dead!
Why??!! Just get some more resilient tyres than summer racing ones
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
You’ll need to watch out for icy roads at that time. Most local authorities publish their gritting routes online. There are usually primary and secondary routes. So plan routes taking advantage of gritted roads. Otherwise if your bike supports it, go off road in winter. The more porous surface generally means ice or frost is rarely an issue.
 

si_c

Guru
Location
Wirral
Mudguards, suitable tyres, lights and warm clothing allow you to ride all year round. The first on that list also means your bike doesn't get too dirty meaning that any wear is minimised and you get less wet, meaning you won't get cold as quickly.

For clothing, warm upper layers, shoe covers, thermal leg covers - either legwarmers or bib tights and an optional waterproof top layer. Also gloves gloves gloves. Until COVID I commuted all year round doing 30 miles a day roughly in all weather.

Keep the tri-cross ready with ice-tyres for when the weather really gets cold.
 

straas

Guru
So, do some of you guys ditch road bikes totally in winter and jump on an MTB ?
No - a lot of people have a "summer" bike - generally better groupset, lighter wheels etc.

Then a "winter" bike, with full mudguards, cheaper kit and heavier or disc wheels, generally wider tyres too.

Summer bikes can obviously be ridden in the winter, but replacing the components is more expensive.
 
Top Bottom