Genesis Conundrum

AndyRM

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I've all but decided to take advantage of the C2W scheme and have narrowed my choice down to two bikes from Genesis:

The Flyer


The Day One


As far as I can see they are the same bike, albeit with different forks and brakes. I'm leaning towards the Flyer, for mostly aesthetic reasons, and I'm not fussed about disc brakes, having had discs in the past and not being convinced by the "benefits".

So, opinions on either welcome, as well as ideas for similar - I'll be getting a £750 voucher so anything below that.

Also, sizing, I'm thinking an L at 6'1" would be spot on?
 
OP
AndyRM

AndyRM

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Oh yeah, and my current bike is a Kona Honky Tonk which will be for sale imminently if anyone might be interested!
 
@AndyRM this may help you make up your mind

the day one has rear facing dropouts with the associated phaff getting the back wheel off and on again in the event of a flat where as the flyer has forward facing (from the images anyway)

saying that, I have the day one decade and really really like it - I just wish it had gears as it would really be my do it all, go anywhere with anything bike.

I am a Genesis fan (also have a ridgeback from yesteryear that is still going strong too).
 
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AndyRM

AndyRM

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@AndyRM this may help you make up your mind

the day one has rear facing dropouts with the associated phaff getting the back wheel off and on again in the event of a flat where as the flyer has forward facing (from the images anyway)

saying that, I have the day one decade and really really like it - I just wish it had gears as it would really be my do it all, go anywhere with anything bike.

I am a Genesis fan (also have a ridgeback from yesteryear that is still going strong too).
Ah, that is a good spot! Definitely a plus point for the Flyer then!
 

EasyPeez

Über Member
As far as I can see they are the same bike
Not quite.

My understanding is that the Day One is basically a single speed Croix de Fer (touring/off road/do-it-all) and the Flyer is a single speed Equilibrium (classic road bike).

So the riding position will be slightly different on each bike, and the Day One frame will have clearance for bigger tyres (not sure how the factory-fitted mudguards affect this.) Indeed the Day One comes with 35mm tyres whereas the Flyer comes with more road-orientated 28mms. They also have different handle bars - the Flyer has lower drops, with it being a sportier bike. So your main riding requirements might be a good thing to base your choice on - i.e will you always be on the road, or will you want to venture down towpaths/woodland tracks? Is riding fast a priority, or is comfort more important etc.

Re: riding position, according to the Genesis website the geometry for each is actually quite different:

http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/road/road-sportive/flyer
http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/urban/urban-and-cross-utility/day-one

But I don't trust that as the Day One is lumped into the 'Urban' category with the Skyline, which looks to me like a completely different bike, and yet, unless I'm being dim, apparently shares the same geometry chart.

If it were me I'd want to at least contact Genesis for clarification on the geometries, but ideally test ride both before making a decision.

One final thing to consider - disc brakes are definitely better than rim brakes in the wet, but the Promax discs on the latest version of the Day One are about as bad as discs brakes get on a 'proper' bike so I'd be budgeting to upgrade those within the first year.

I'm with @uphillstruggler as a Genesis fan. I've got an Equilibrium and recently picked up a second hand Day One. They're a bit different to ride, and each serves a different purpose to me, but I love them both.

Let us know which you plump for.

Cheers.
 
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@EasyPeez

it bugs me that the only legit importer of shimano products into the country and producer of Genesis/Ridgeback etc seem to be using cheaper products on their bikes - there is no need to penny pinch on what is quite high end bikes.

it would seem they develop a bike with decent equipment then, once its got a defining reputation, lower the spec, maybe hoping the masses wont notice.

that said, I still like them a lot but my days of buying new bikes is now over.
 
OP
AndyRM

AndyRM

XOXO
Location
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Not quite.

My understanding is that the Day One is basically a single speed Croix de Fer (touring/off road/do-it-all) and the Flyer is a single speed Equilibrium (classic road bike).

So the riding position will be slightly different on each bike, and the Day One frame will have clearance for bigger tyres (not sure how the factory-fitted mudguards affect this.) Indeed the Day One comes with 35mm tyres whereas the Flyer comes with more road-orientated 28mms. They also have different handle bars - the Flyer has lower drops, with it being a sportier bike. So your main riding requirements might be a good thing to base your choice on - i.e will you always be on the road, or will you want to venture down towpaths/woodland tracks? Is riding fast a priority, or is comfort more important etc.

Re: riding position, according to the Genesis website the geometry for each is actually quite different:

http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/road/road-sportive/flyer
http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/urban/urban-and-cross-utility/day-one

But I don't trust that as the Day One is lumped into the 'Urban' category with the Skyline, which looks to me like a completely different bike, and yet, unless I'm being dim, apparently shares the same geometry chart.

If it were me I'd want to at least contact Genesis for clarification on the geometries, but ideally test ride both before making a decision.

One final thing to consider - disc brakes are definitely better than rim brakes in the wet, but the Promax discs on the latest version of the Day One are about as bad as discs brakes get on a 'proper' bike so I'd be budgeting to upgrade those within the first year.

I'm with @uphillstruggler as a Genesis fan. I've got an Equilibrium and recently picked up a second hand Day One. They're a bit different to ride, and each serves a different purpose to me, but I love them both.

Let us know which you plump for.

Cheers.
Thank you, that's a lot more in depth examination of the frames than I had given myself time for!

I'll be on the road and the occasional shared usage path so I'm still leaning towards the Flyer.

One thing that's now crossed my mind is that I have a bracket on my current bike which connects to MiniRM's trailer. I'll have to check if it's compatible with a non QR skewer.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
@EasyPeez

it bugs me that the only legit importer of shimano products into the country and producer of Genesis/Ridgeback etc seem to be using cheaper products on their bikes - there is no need to penny pinch on what is quite high end bikes.

it would seem they develop a bike with decent equipment then, once its got a defining reputation, lower the spec, maybe hoping the masses wont notice.

that said, I still like them a lot but my days of buying new bikes is now over.
I expect it's more that parts have got much more expensive over the last few years and they don't want to increase the cost of the whole bike, especially if considering the C2W market. Not penny pinching per se, rather keeping the cost of the bike at what it has been in the past. This is partly why I now prefer to buy a frame and then build up (also because no one really specs road bikes as I want them, i.e. SRAM)
 

EasyPeez

Über Member
@uphillstruggler

I agree with you, it's annoying/disappointing, though I think 'market forces' as outlined by @vickster are a key factor, rather than wilful penny-pinching.

Either way, the package that the new bike buyer ends up with definitely seems to get worse year on year.

I was considering a new Day One at nearly £600, but then found a barely used 2013 model on ebay for £250.

Reynolds frame vs unbranded steel, Avid BB7 discs vs Promax, Continental Tyres vs CST, Alexrims vs Jalco rims...virtually every component of the new bike, from the frame to the bar tape, is inferior on the 2018 model compared to the 2013 model.

The only thing better about the new one was that it came with mudguards fitted, but that's a cheap and simple enough home addition.

I hope I won't need another bike now for many years, but when the time comes I can't see myself doing anything other than buying secondhand or buying a frame and adding my own choice of components.
 
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