Getting tired of the effort it takes to save money......

derrick

The Glue that binds us together.
Expensive holidays can put a satisfying dent in finances :sun: (unless you’re a multi millionaire/billionaire I guess)
Never done expensive holidays. Just lots of good ones.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Valhalla
Are you sure your definition of good holiday isn't just a cheap one?
Going down to your shed at the bottom of the garden isn't really a holiday....in my opinion!
Depends on your perspective. If an annual shed break allows the holiday maker to save sufficient money to retire in their 40's then that person has the rest of their life as one long holiday.

Conversely, a sun bunny may get a week or two every year somewhere or other, but may end up working into their late 60's or beyond to pay for the habit.

From where I'm sitting, in my armchair designed for prematurely retired people of leisure, the Butlins inspired shed vacation seems a most splendid option. If you prefer spending your life up a chimney or down a pit then the expensive holiday may be for you.

So you enjoy your annual 2 weeks annual break in whatever place it is you fancy, and Derrick and I will enjoy our 52 weeks annual chillax with equal relish.
 
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Rusty Nails

We remember
Location
Here and there
Depends on your perspective. If an annual shed break allows the holiday maker to save sufficient money to retire in their 40's then that person has the rest of their life as one long holiday.

Conversely, a sun bunny may get a week or two every year somewhere or other, but may end up working into their late 60's or beyond to pay for the habit.

From where I'm sitting, in my armchair designed for prematurely retired people of leisure, the Butlins inspired shed vacation seems a most splendid option. If you prefer spending your life up a chimney or down a pit then the expensive holiday may be for you.

So you enjoy your annual 2 weeks annual break in whatever place it is you fancy, and Derrick and I will enjoy our 52 weeks annual chillax with equal relish.
The money saved by shed breaks for around 20 years is not going to allow anyone to retire in their 40s, who hasn't won the lottery, worked in the city, or retired from one of the uniformed services, let alone people who do mundane jobs.
 

itboffin

Über Member
Location
Marlborough
i'm up for saving money by switching in fact one of my customers that's their business model, i'm lucky my good lady takes care of most of all that, we're also sufficiently old but not too old that anything car related is cheap, what's not cheap are those holidays and we dont want them to be a compromise as both of us have lots most of our families to the big C or sudden heart attacks, none of which we're due to being unfit or unhealthy.

Switch energy, insurance etc every year is a total ball ache, but dont let that put you off, the potential savings are huge over a lifetime.

Mind you i'm dreading the end of Jan. as all of my significant necessary agreements are up for renewal, same BS every year where we have to switch due to the short sightedness of businesses to realise keeping customers is far more cost efficient than winning new ones.

yawn!
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Valhalla
The money saved by shed breaks for around 20 years is not going to allow anyone to retire in their 40s, who hasn't won the lottery, worked in the city, or retired from one of the uniformed services, let alone people who do mundane jobs.
I managed it through savings and doing materially well out of a divorce, and due to a bit of luck (although I'm a firm believer that you make your own luck) I ended up owning 2 houses outright so have a steady rental 8ncome. I could have no pension at all and still - barely - have stopped when I did.

Think about it. I've never had car finance, so that's 3 and a half grand or more I've saved, each and every single year of my adult life - if we assume 300 sovs a month is fairly typical, that is £125,000 that I haven't spent that the typical working car driving adult has chucked away. That's gone into my bank.

Multiply that by all the other things people spend their money on, and suddenly in my early 40's I find that I have a lot, and I mean a lot, of liquidity. That gave me something to think about sat in my sun lounger on the patio for 2 weeks every year. Think about that next time you sign up for a new car, holiday, mobile phone contract, gym membership, etc, etc. The choice is yours and no one elses.

It's a lifetime of undisciplined spending habits that delays retirement for a significant number of people, but they're too close to the problem to see it and blame the fact that they weren't in the forces or uniform services for having to work so late in life instead. Well I've news for them - they're simply wrong.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Doesn't your wife still work though? Of course, she may very much enjoy doing so and have no desire to stop :okay:

Frankly, I'd be bored stupid if I retired (and I enjoy the social aspect of work, some of my best friends are or have been colleagues). A couple of years ago I did decide to work 4 days a week, which gives me plenty of time for hobbies and life admin and loads of money for holidays and ample savings :okay: I've never had a car loan either and I just paid off my mortgage
 
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BoldonLad

Über Member
Location
South Tyneside
Doesn't your wife still work though? Of course, she may very much enjoy doing so. :okay:

Frankly, I'd be bored stupid if I retired. A couple of years ago I did decide to work 4 days a week, which gives me plenty of time for hobbies and life admin and loads of money for holidays and ample savings :okay: I've never had a car loan either and I just paid off my mortgage
No, although I do regularly suggest to her that, she may, feel much more fulfilled if she got a job. So far all I get in return is an answer ending in "off" ;)
 

Electric_Andy

Heavy Metal Fan
Location
Plymouth
I agree with Drago, there are loads of things that we all want and think we need, but we really don't need all of them. Making small changes can often build up over time. I made a conscious effort to not buy food at work, some weeks I was spending up to £15 in M&S so i now take food to work and keep fruit and rice cakes in my draw as a back-up. That's potentially £60/month saved.

I'm signed up to l**k after my b1lls which only saves me about £1/month from what I can see, but I don't have to do any work or make any calls.

I also try to sell one item on ebay per month, if I don't use it of course. My phone bill is £13/month. I know people who have the latest handsets and unlimited minutes, who spend £60/month. Who needs to talk all the time? I have used 16 minutes of call time so far in January! My handset is cracked but still works fine, so I'll keep it as long as it works, it's lasted 4 years so far.

I also drive a rubbish car, but it's cheap to run. I'd love a better car and more toys, but now I've got older I know they won't bring me any more joy once the novelty has worn off. So I try to get internal enjoyment from experiences.

I am lucky as well though, my parents give me a weeks holiday in Cornwall every year (they come too). I would not pay for a foreign holiday unless it was dirt cheap. For me, it's who you're with that makes for a good time. And a holiday needn't be going away either. If you're off work and enjoying something, that's a holiday to me, whether it's working on a project in the garage or garden, or just sitting in your pants watching telly. Time enjoyed is not time wasted.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I'm not that focused on having enough money for old age to be honest.
I do pay into a pension and have ample savings (which increase month on month). I'd rather enjoy the money and life (including seeing the world, visiting friends overseas) - while I'm (relatively) fit and (relatively) young.
I've not bought a new (to me) car for 6 years (no point, I do about 4000 miles a year tops
I'm in the fortunate position of having no dependants and am well paid ;). Yes, I'll probably die a spinster but I'll still have lots of friends and will have enjoyed myself getting there ^_^ I have no ambition to live to 100!

I do still do due diligence when car and home insurances are due (that said, I'm now with Aviva Plus for both who do not charge existing customers more than new, with the added bonus of 20% off because I have an ancient pension pot with them from an old job) and I do shop around for most things that I buy that cost more than a quid or two

Others want different things from life which is absolutely fine and should be respected :okay:
 
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