Good price for a spirit burner and also Trangia

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
I had a look around the following website posted in another forum reference, messenger bag, and amongst the camping stoves section, there is a spirit burner plus pans for £9.99 and also a Trangia 25, for £33.99 which is a good price. I have not looked too deep into the website but I presume VAT is on those prices and there is no other twists to the prices
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
zacklaws said:
... the following website...
Er, what website? Or have my eyes finally packed in?
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
andrew_s said:
You can make a perfectly good spirit burner out of old drinks cans. Even cheaper!
It if if you can be bothered with the faff of having to fabricate pan supports and wind shields as well as purchasing pans to do the job.

Minimalism is good for those with a masochistic streak :biggrin:

I prefer 'one stop shop' solutions

E.g.

A Trangia in preference to home made spirit burners.
A tent in preference to a hammock and the search for suitable spaced elevated anchoring points
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
Referring back to the original post. The Trangia is a known performer. I've never been disappointed with any trangia stoves performance with the exception of the mini Trangia which in its pursuit of light weight, lost its windshield and its capacity to function in windy conditions without improvising a windshield.

I bought a cheap Lidl Trangia clone for my son to take to festivals. I borrowed it once to augment my Trangia as I wanted to cook a couple of meals needing two burners. I was disappointed with the performance of the Lidl stove - it took much longer than the Trangia to boil water. The Ohlson version might work well - it might not.
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
Darthwhite said:
Whats the consensus on the British army crusader set?.
I would go for the Trangia every time - well designed and well made. I mean, who would you rather set off for the South Pole with: Scott, or a Scandinavian who knew what he was doing?
 
OP
zacklaws

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
I too well recommend the Trangia especially for its simplicity and reliability and is my cooker of choice for lengthy excursions. I have a Primus Multifuel which is my favourite cooker and also a Coleman, but they are not without there occasional problems, such as blockages which then require stripping and cleaning along with the smell of petrol tainting everything they come in contact with.

As for the Crusader, it looks good, but you have to consider the availability of the fuel, unless its possible to stick a Trangia burner underneath but if so, then you would be just as well buying a Swedish Army Trangia off Ebay or a surplus shop from about a fiver to a tenner. They are a little bulky and heavy but they are good as I sometimes use that version when fishing when I am in the car
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
Darthwhite said:
Whats the concensus on the British army cursader set?

http://www.lakelandbushcraft.co.uk/acatalog/BCB.html

I saw one in action while out camping a few months back and it was quite impressive for doing "the basics" like tea, hot water, soup etc, and the burner / mug bit was miniscule and weighed almost nothing.
I'd leave it alone.

It uses fuel gel packages which are expensive and difficult to find out on tour unless you take enough with you to see you through. Fine for a weekend - not so fine for a three week tour in France.

I've not come across a meths burning stove that has equalled nevermind bettered the Trangia. Buying anything else is a false economy.
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
andrew_s said:
The Caldera Cone?
50g (or 160g including carrying caddy/mug) vs 370g for a Trangia 27UL windshield and burner
Nope, the portion size of any meal cookable on it is too small nor does is come with a frying pan and second pan.

Weight ain't everything.

Versatility and usefulness swings it for me.

It would also help if the stockist had it in stock for it to be even considered as a viable alternative;)
 

andrew_s

Guru
Location
Gloucester
This version do you then? I dare say a 1L pot would nest nicely inside the 1.5L pot. In stock too.
Still, it's not really a cheap option when you consider that you have to add in the cost of the pan that it's designed to use (which all seem to be titanium models).

I generally use gas, my priority being reduced bulk rather than less weight
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
andrew_s said:
This version do you then? I dare say a 1L pot would nest nicely inside the 1.5L pot. In stock too.
Still, it's not really a cheap option when you consider that you have to add in the cost of the pan that it's designed to use (which all seem to be titanium models).

I generally use gas, my priority being reduced bulk rather than less weight
I'd be very happy to use it if it cost the same as a Trangia :laugh:
 

andym

Über Member
vernon said:
Nope, the portion size of any meal cookable on it is too small nor does is come with a frying pan and second pan.

Weight ain't everything.

Versatility and usefulness swings it for me.

It would also help if the stockist had it in stock for it to be even considered as a viable alternative;)
The Caldera Cone comes in lots of different sizes. There's a complete list here:

http://www.traildesigns.com/caldera-cone.html

The largest size seems to be for an everlight 1.9 litre pot. Probably enough for most of us. If fried breakfasts are important to you then this may not be the way to go - although it would be OK but not ideal for occasional frying.

It's an excellent, practical design and well worth considering. Yes you need to buy pots separately, and you may need to order from the States, nut in returm for the extra cost and hassle you get a greater range of choice.
 
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