Hip Replacement - Any Experiences?

Discussion in 'Training, Fitness and Health' started by Alex H, 21 Jun 2015.

  1. Alex H

    Alex H Guru

    Location:
    Alnwick
    My wife and tandem stoker :rolleyes: has had osteo-arthritis for a very long time now. In recent years her hips have given her grief and a flare-up once a year counteracted by drugs was the norm. This year, however,was worse than 'normal' and methods used in the past are no longer used or in favour.

    So, the consultant at the local hospital has recommended a replacement operation. Needless to say this is not a trivial matter and we are trying to get information from as many people that have been through the operation as we can.

    Anyone had one? Partner, spouse or near relative?

    We really want to know about the recovery and life after the operation.

    (No tandem riding this year due to the pain :sad: and gardening is very limited )
     
  2. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    I had a hip replaced four years ago, so can bore for England about it.

    Like your wife's, my hip was simply arthritic and became progressively worse as the months and years passed.

    The op was delayed because I was too young - early 50s - but in the end I was in constant pain and couldn't walk across a room.

    It was a glimpse of a lifestyle I didn't fancy.

    The op was fairly straightforward, although I did need a blood transfusion because I leaked a bit too much on the table.

    Out of hospital on crutches after a week.

    Initial recovery was quite quick.

    To start with, I could only manage a few paces, but within a few weeks I was clipping along for a few hundred metres quite well.

    I can't recall exactly how long it was before I could ride a bike, a few months or so.

    The main problem was getting on and off, the new hip didn't have much impact on pedalling one way or the other.

    Apparent leg length is an issue.

    From what I can gather, the joint - or more accurately its relationship to the other side - settles over time.

    Thus the consultant has to set the length using his skill and judgment as to how much settlement will happen.

    My new hip/leg felt far too short immediately post-op, but this did improve a lot as the months passed.

    I am still a little lop-sided, so still have a limp.

    However my case is complicated because the other hip is going the same way.

    Until that one is replaced, I won't know the final outcome.

    Being in the hip replacement loop, I've spoken to lots of people who have had it done.

    Most can walk afterwards so close to normal as to make no difference.

    The one problem I did hear of might be instructive to you.

    It was a woman who was looked after by her partner after coming out of hospital.

    He obviously meant well, but the care and attention allowed her to sit around and play the patient.

    The new joint needs to be used - lightly - immediately and regularly.

    So for you there might have to be an element of being cruel to be kind by encouraging the wife to move about when the option is there not to.
     
  3. midlife

    midlife Veteran

    Silly question but how old is your stoker?

    Shaun
     
  4. winjim

    winjim A youth of interminable age

    My mum had both hips replaced in 2013. She's since been on holiday to Jordan, tango dancing in Buenos Aires and this year ascended Snowdon.
     
    User259, Dave 123, bancrobba and 4 others like this.
  5. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    As @User13710 says, I had a hip replaced 3 years ago.
    You're walking from day 1, and in a couple of weeks I was walking up to a mile. I walked to the surgery and back to have the dressing removed (about 2 miles) after 2 or 3 weeks, which was slightly too far in truth.
    I was on the turbo trainer after 6 weeks, albeit lightly. Outside road riding after 3 months and I think I rode a 100 miler inside 6 months.
    There's a lot of benefit to be had by doing the recommended exercise regime rigorously to build up the muscles in the hip, groin and pelvic area. I was a bit laissez-faire and assumed that cycling alone would be enough. I can cycle pain-free now and have carried on doing physical work and I'm still athletic in the bedroom. Leaping out of bed to make the tea in the morning, and that sort of thing.:okay:
    I'd recommend it if she's suffering pain, sleep-disturbance and lifestyle compromises.
     
  6. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    I probably could have phrased it better !:smile:
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Alex H

    Alex H Guru

    Location:
    Alnwick
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Alex H

    Alex H Guru

    Location:
    Alnwick
    Let's just say over pensionable age :laugh:
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Alex H

    Alex H Guru

    Location:
    Alnwick
    They'll only do one a year here, but that sounds encouraging, but she's never been a dancer or a climber ^_^
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Alex H

    Alex H Guru

    Location:
    Alnwick
    @rich p, @Pale Rider is it true that you have to sleep on your back for the first week or so?
     
  11. tincaman

    tincaman Veteran

    This thread is interesting, mine is being replaced on Aug 13th.
    Can still manage 50 miles hilly rides, but walking more than 200 yds is a real problem
     
  12. rich p

    rich p ridiculous old lush

    Location:
    Brighton
    It's recommended that you do, to reduce the risk of dislocation in the early days. I did so, but a friend of mine didn't, with no repercussions.
     
    Alex H likes this.
  13. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    I didn't lie on the replacement side for a week or two, mostly because putting pressure on the dressed wound was uncomfortable and just didn't seem like a good idea.

    There was something in the leaflets about how long after the operation I had to wait before I could have a bonk.

    Didn't pay much attention to that because I didn't need to.
     
    fossyant and Alex H like this.
  14. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    Accords with my experience, riding a bike was never a problem, getting on and off the ruddy thing and walking was.

    If I made a rehab 'mistake' it was thinking walking and using an exercise bike would save me the bother of doing the specific physio exercises I was told to.

    Walking is OK, but cycling doesn't really do anything from a hip replacement rehab point of view.

    So for my next hip, I will be paying more attention to what the physiotherapist says and what's in the leaflets they give you on discharge.
     
  15. youngoldbloke

    youngoldbloke The older I get, the faster I used to be ...

    Looks like this is on the cards for me too. I've read a lot online, and one aspect that puzzles me is regarding bike position during rehab. Advice often says raise the saddle - I don't see how you can do this if your saddle is at the correct height anyway? Also the angle of torso to leg not less than 90' at top dead centre. I'll need to raise my bars and shorten my stems a lot to achieve this, in fact it might not be possible on a couple of my bikes. Will I eventually be able to ride in as aero a position after rehab as I do now or am I going to be faced with getting rid of my existing bikes? How easy is it to get on a bike on a turbo?
     
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