How do professional cyclists manage to get such incredibly low resting heart rates?

Anonymous1502

Active Member
How do they manage to lower the resting heart rate (heart rate in the 30s for example)? Is it the years of training or do they have a different physiology? My resting heart rate tends to be in the 90s so I find this shocking.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
How do they manage to lower the resting heart rate (heart rate in the 30s for example)? Is it the years of training or do they have a different physiology? My resting heart rate tends to be in the 90s so I find this shocking.
You’re 19 and your resting heart rate is in the 90s. We’re all different but it might be sensible to consult a Dr!! How are you measuring it?

I’m 48, overweight and mine is constantly mid 50s (measured by different wearables and at hospitals)
 
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winjim

✊🏻✊🏾 🌈 😷
Blimey, I just measured mine at 60bpm and I'm a 42yo frazzled stressed out autistic (therefore anxious) parent of two young children. OP are you sure you're measuring correctly?
 

Lovacott

Well-Known Member
How do they manage to lower the resting heart rate (heart rate in the 30s for example)? Is it the years of training or do they have a different physiology? My resting heart rate tends to be in the 90s so I find this shocking.
The resting heart rate should be taken when you have spent at least an hour doing nothing. Mine comes in at 47bpm but it is around 90bpm just after doing normal stuff like walking around. I have a fitness watch and a proper blood pressure/heart rate monitor and they both give me the same readings.

Before I started commuting, it was around 65 to 70bpm and it dropped as my heart got stronger. When I started doing the big hiils, my heart went like the clappers and felt as though it was going to burst out of my chest. It also took quite a while to normalise after I stopped cycling.

Now, the hills are easier, my heart rate doesn't get so high and my breathing is more relaxed.

The harder you push yourself, the fitter you will get.
 

delb0y

Guru
Location
Quedgeley, Glos
Haven't measured mine for years, but when I did measure it first thing in the morning it was high 30s /low 40s - and I'm far from being fit. I guess I was probably late 40s then. I did ask the doctor about it once, but was told it showed my heart was in good shape.
 

HMS_Dave

Über Member
Location
Midlands
My resting heart beat when i visited the doctors at 27 stone and sedentary was in the high 80's. I would suggest your high rate monitor is not reading your beats correctly. Try feeling your pulse and try counting the beats for a minute. Better still, have someone else do it...
 

gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
Havnt measured mine in ages but when fit at say 50 yo, my resting HR would generally be sub 60, occasionally around 55.
At 62 with virtually no cycling nowadays, it's around 65.
 

cougie uk

Senior Member
The heart is a muscle. The more exercise it gets the bigger it gets. So a trained athletes heart will pump more blood around with each beat.

Yours does sound high. Are you measuring it properly ?
 

rogerzilla

Legendary Member
It relaxes very soon after you start regular aerobic exercise. Mine is about 45. It's not a great indicator of overall fitness.
 
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