IAM Advice

Apparently there is a new book out from the Institute of Advanced Motorists with advice for cyclists.

28 April 2010
The IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) is urging cyclists to “claim their lane”, in How to be a better cyclist, a practical guide to cycling, launched in London today.​
The new guide provides comprehensive advice for safer cycling and is aimed at current and would-be cyclists of any level of experience. It also champions the idea of cyclists taking up a primary position on the road.
Duncan Pickering, IAM Cycling Development Manager, said: “Many cyclists are unsure whether to stick to the kerb or push out into the road when riding in towns. How to be a better cyclist advises cyclists to stay nearer but not close to the kerb on long, even stretches, but where safe and appropriate to do so, to assert themselves (such as when approaching a side road), pushing out into the road and making themselves visible to drivers.”
How to be a better cyclist is the third book in a series from the IAM, promoting proven cognitive road safety methods such as anticipation, self awareness and reaction, applying them to drivers, motorcyclists and cyclists. The new book can be used for personal study or in conjunction with training to the National Cycle Training standard.
Steered by advice from cycling expert John Franklin, How to be a better cyclist not only offers advice on staying safe on the roads, it explores techniques that allow cyclists to better integrate with traffic, react dynamically to changing situations and make better progress. In short, to make cycling a more satisfying and enjoyable experience.
Simon Best, IAM Chief Executive, says: “The IAM hopes that people of any age will use How to be a better cyclist to get the most out of their cycle journeys, whether in the town or the country, and that the book will reach those who could benefit from our knowledge and experience.”
How to be a better cyclist can be ordered online at the IAM website, iam.org.uk, at £9.99 plus postage and packaging.
ENDS
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ENDS ALL
1. The IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) directly influences the driving and riding of more than 100,000 full members in the UK and Ireland. Established in 1956, the IAM is today best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving course, which is available to car, motorcycle and commercial licence holders. The IAM has grown to become the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to raising driving standards, engaging with the road-using public and influencing road safety policy. The commercial division of the IAM operates through the occupational driver training company IAM Drive & Survive.
2. A 2006 report by Brunel University, following an 18 month study, concluded that “advanced driver training produces safer drivers and lower accident involvement”, with measurable improvements in knowledge, skills and attitude.
3. In January 2007, the IAM established the Policy and Research Division to undertake research, promote practical policies, act as an advocate for safer roads, safer drivers and safer vehicles and encourage responsible motoring through education and training.
The link is here.
 

BentMikey

Rider of Seolferwulf
Location
South London
DKUATB Dave!
 
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magnatom

Guest
Has it been posted before? Oops! I've been down in London the past couple of days (and at the Etape at the weekend!) ;):biggrin:

I have to say I saw some terrible cycling down in Londoninium. I was staying down in Bethnal Green and saw loads of cyclists without lights at night, running red lights etc. :sad:
 

Bollo

Failed Tech Bro
Location
Winch
magnatom said:
Has it been posted before? Oops! I've been down in London the past couple of days (and at the Etape at the weekend!) ;):sad:

I have to say I saw some terrible cycling down in Londoninium. I was staying down in Bethnal Green and saw loads of cyclists without lights at night, running red lights etc. :biggrin:
You were down in dat der London!?:biggrin: Why was there no announcement in the Metro!? Audience with Boris?!

Seriously, when visiting my outlaws in Stratford the craziness of London cycling leaves me a little breathless. Things are much calmer in the Shires.
 
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magnatom

Guest
BentMikey said:
I'm gutted, I'd have made the effort to come up and see you Dave! I was wondering where you'd been, the forums have been quiet without you and you were missed.


Here's the bit that Plax posted.
https://www.cyclechat.net/

Ah, I was busy and with some guys from work, so I wouldn't have had time to socialise. (although we did have a nice curry, can't remember the name though). If I'm down again and have time, I'll be sure to let you know. ;)
 

fimm

Veteran
Location
Edinburgh
There's a bit of a review here

This book has now been published and I have my copy.

Only a quick overview so far, but it seems full of excellent advice, - which we were expecting given John Franklin's input. John Franklin includes a very well expressed Testimonial at the start, which emphasises the shared ground of road safety.

The book is well presented with loads of photographs (which has pleased my wife no end as the staged ones seem to be largely taken in Peterborough!
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).

The book seems very robust with respect to taking primary positions, and selective use only of cycle facilities. Not only does the HC now support our position/rights, but so does the Institute of Advanced Motorists. Surely to be welcomed?

Chapter and section headings include, amongst others, Observation, Hazards, Riding Plans, Positioning, Conservation of momentum, Negotiation, Filtering etc etc.

For those of us that are IAM members or otherwise Advanced driver trained it is interesting to note that the System of Car Control has been lifted entirely to become the Planned System of Cycling - also using IPSGA (Information/Position/Speed/Gear/Acceleration) with respect to dealing with hazards. IPSGA is refered to throughout with examples, as Roadcraft.

As I have only speed read so far, I may stand corrected, but I feel there could have been more on conflict resolution/avoidance with motorists. Roadcraft has a section on behaviour at the wheel and the avoidance of "Red mist" (admittedly, and inevitably biased towards emergency drivers) but something similar here may have been useful? Especially judging by some of the posts about pursuing confrontation, that we often get on the forum
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If you have already read Cyclecraft then perhaps there is not much new content here, but as an IAM member I am happy with this publication. Education, education, education?
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Note, this is not my opinion, but is quoted from the CTC forum post linked to.
 

Attachments

wesa

Well-Known Member
Location
Oxfordshire
I tried contacting the IAM cycling group to get some more info on the book and the training courses that they refer to, I never had a reply from them.

I just ordered a copy. Can someone explain how (allowing for delivery costs) the book is cheaper from Amazon than it is from the IAM!
 

HaloJ

Rabid cycle nut
Location
Watford
Origamist said:
I've just ordered How to be a Better Cyclist. It will be interesting to compare its approach to Cyclecraft.
I'm reading Cyclecraft at the moment. I'd be interested in your thoughts.

Abs
 

Origamist

Legendary Member
Location
Sandbach
HaloJ said:
I'm reading Cyclecraft at the moment. I'd be interested in your thoughts.

Abs
I'll cobble something together when the book arrives and I've had a chance to compare the texts.

However, based on the CTC review (a forummer?) the change of methodology to: Information/Position/Speed/Gear/Acceleration is significant as this is a model/drill advanced drivers use and Cyclecraft did not explicitly codify cycling in those terms previously.

A side note, my first copy of Cyclecraft (1988) has Franklin cycling helmet-less on the cover, my later version from the 2000s has the cyclist's head deliberately cropped (so you can't see if they are wearing a helmet), and the most recent IAM/Franklin text How to be a Better Cyclist...has the cyclist wearing a helmet on the front cover. Times have changed...
 

HaloJ

Rabid cycle nut
Location
Watford
Origamist said:
I'll cobble something together when the book arrives and I've had a chance to compare the texts.

However, based on the CTC review (a forummer?) the change of methodology to: Information/Position/Speed/Gear/Acceleration is significant as this is a model/drill advanced drivers use and Cyclecraft did not explicitly codify cycling in those terms previously.

A side note, my first copy of Cyclecraft (1988) has Franklin cycling helmet-less on the cover, my later version from the 2000s has the cyclist's head deliberately cropped (so you can't see if they are wearing a helmet), and the most recent IAM/Franklin text How to be a Better Cyclist...has the cyclist wearing a helmet on the front cover. Times have changed...
I have the 88 edition also and had noticed that. Picked it up in mint condition for 50p. ;)
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
wesa said:
I tried contacting the IAM cycling group to get some more info on the book and the training courses that they refer to, I never had a reply from them.

I just ordered a copy. Can someone explain how (allowing for delivery costs) the book is cheaper from Amazon than it is from the IAM!
IAM have to buy it from Amazon before they can sell it to you... :sad:
 
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