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Is my freewheel buggered?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Will1985, 29 Aug 2007.

  1. Will1985

    Will1985 Über Member

    Location:
    South Norfolk
    I haven't ridden my MTB for a while, but whilst doing it up this morning, I noticed that 2 driveside spokes and 1 non-driveside spoke have snapped at the neck by the hub.

    Here comes the stupid part: I thought that I might be able to buy some spokes and do the wheel myself once I had removed the freewheel block. So, I follow Sheldon Brown's advice about putting the freewheel puller into a vice and rotating the wheel anti-clockwise. First, I had a go with an old 6-speed wheel and it just needed a bit of force. Ok I think; no problem here - so I reset the freewheel puller (actually just a splined cassette tool) and have a go with the 7-speed wheel. I kept turning and suddenly the wheel turned - unfortunately because my cassette tool has shattered into 4 pieces! Not being one to give up, I find another cassette tool and exactly the same thing happened! ;)

    How can this happen? I have an MTB for 8 years and can get the block off easily, but one ridden for less than 18 months won't budge....can it be due to the enormous amount of torque I generate!?!?! (I like to think), or that the block may have been screwed on wrongly and cross-threaded. Bear in mind that it is a cheapo Decathlon bought in Italy.....I'm wondering whether the mechanic might have done something?
    Thoughts anyone?
     
  2. skwerl

    skwerl New Member

    Location:
    London
    is it a cassette or a screw-on freewheel block?
     
  3. Probably a grease free interface twixt block and hub. If you are happy to sacrifice the freewheel to save the wheel use a pin spanner to disassemble it down to the block, then put the block itself in the vise to remove it.
     
  4. Will1985

    Will1985 Über Member

    Location:
    South Norfolk
    Skwerl - it's a screw-on block

    mickle - I saw that on Sheldon Brown's site, but I'm also tempted to snip out the spokes and start again with a newer cassette hub
     
  5. And save what? The rim? I wouldnt bother. Frankly you'd be better off buying a half decent complete wheel than rebuilding onto what is almost certainly an 'entry level' OE rim.
     
  6. TimO

    TimO Veteran

    Location:
    London
    Not to mention that spokes are actually generally pretty tough, you would probably find it interesting trying to cut through an entire wheels worth.