Livall Smart Helmet MT1

Grendel

Veteran
Inside the helmet there are controls mounted just inside the brim, power on, volume up and down, co-located with a microphone and a charging port. This charging port is one of my few (possibly only) dislikes about the helmet, as while it’s waterproof and pretty much idiot proof, it’s also unlike any other charging cable on the market, so if you want a spare or replacement then it’s off to the manufacturer you go. To charge it simply plug it in and place the magnetic pad on the recessed slot on the helmet. Two lights on the rear will illuminate to show it is charging, and they’ll go out when it’s finished. The battery life is advertised as being up to 10 hours, but as I routinely charge the helmet after a ride I’ve never taken it to the limit.

Either side of the helmet are two neatly recessed speakers, allowing you to listen to music, hear notifications or take phone calls on the move. I’m not a great fan of listening to music on the bike, but it provides a perfectly listenable level of sound. Of more use personally is the fact that I can hear notifications from my cycling app, telling me time and distance covered. You can also take phone calls while cycling (or redial with a double tap on the red button) and the microphone works really well, even at speed.

As I said the helmet connects to your phone and this does mean that the bluetooth function should be enabled on the phone for this to work. This also allows another really important feature to operate, the emergency contact feature. By downloading the Livall app you can programme in up to three emergency numbers who will receive a text message if the helmet detects that you have had a fall. In the event of you taking a fall the sensor will detect the unusual motion and trigger a 90 second countdown feature, which allows you to cancel the alarm if you are able. If you are incapacitated or can’t respond within 90 seconds then your emergency contacts will receive a text telling them who has had an accident, when it happened, where it happened and a link to show this on a map. I’ve tested this and it is remarkably accurate, although I’d assume that the sending of the message would be reliant on your phone surviving any impact.

Overall this is a superb piece of equipment, and when you consider the price of a standard helmet with none of these features, then it’s not such an excessive expense. It’s lightweight and comfortable, and if you are looking for a new helmet and especially if you use timing apps, it’s worth giving this serious consideration.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Is there a lithium battery and jaggedy electronics inside the helmet? This seems like a bad idea.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Taking and making calls sounds like a dangerous idea when riding a bike.
Fair point. Hands free phone use reduces a car drivers reactions to those of a drink driver, so I can't see it doing a cyclist any favours.

I'm with MJR. Placing solid objects inside a structure that functions by virtue of its energy absorbing characteristics doesn't seem a bright idea, and their website shows no evidence that this particular issue has been addressed in testing. I'll pass.
 
OP
Grendel

Grendel

Veteran
Is there a lithium battery and jaggedy electronics inside the helmet? This seems like a bad idea.
Without opening it up, I can't say what the layout is. I'd imagine it would be no more dangerous than helmet mounted lights, cameras, etc.
 
OP
Grendel

Grendel

Veteran
Taking and making calls sounds like a dangerous idea when riding a bike.
Not necessarily. There are many instances where a call may be received or made quite safely. As the speakers are located so as not to impede hearing your surrounding noise I'd say it certainly safer than wearing actual headphones, which may people do.
As I say, I use it mainly for the ability to be able to hear prompts from Runkeeper. It doesn't interfere with my ability to hear what's going around me.
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
Not necessarily. There are many instances where a call may be received or made quite safely. As the speakers are located so as not to impede hearing your surrounding noise I'd say it certainly safer than wearing actual headphones, which may people do.
As I say, I use it mainly for the ability to be able to hear prompts from Runkeeper. It doesn't interfere with my ability to hear what's going around me.
It's not about the sound but the concentration required for the call with someone who has no idea of your situation. It's akin to riding a bike whilst drunk.
 
OP
Grendel

Grendel

Veteran
It's not about the sound but the concentration required for the call with someone who has no idea of your situation. It's akin to riding a bike whilst drunk.
As the person on the bike, it's really up to you to consider whether it's safe to take a call. For example on a quiet cyclepath, I'd have no problems.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Pulling over, stopping, and getting your phone out...
With a time limit before it goes to Voicemail...

A surprising number of crashes happen when stopping or starting, so I suggest that's not great safety either. My approach is to ignore calls when in motion, same as driving, then stop and call back if needed, but I've much less objection to people calling while cycling because I've seen enough do it without problem, especially hands free like that hat.

Maybe it is like cycling while drunk, but the drink cycling limit is correctly weaker than the drink driving one so maybe the phone cycling limit should be weaker than the phone driving one too?
 
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