Living on your own.

MntnMan62

Über Member
Location
Northern NJ
The only friend you need is a dog.
 

BrumJim

Forum Stalwart (won't take the hint and leave...)
Lived on my own on-and-off from 1997 to 2004.

I'm not a natural fit with the concept of living on your own. I'm by nature very extrovert, but not being the best company it was an essential part of moving on and buying a house, rather than perpetual shared renting.

I found that my emotions were much greater when on my own. My low times were very low indeed, and the good times were matched with very high levels of excitement.

Very glad I wasn't on my own during this COVID-19 pandemic. Not too sure how I would have survived if I was.
 
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Pale Rider

Legendary Member
Add a few days to that in a hot summer and things could get a bit whiffy!
I've known of a couple of instances in which people have died alone in flats.

On both occasions, the neighbours noticed a strange smell, but it cleared before they got around to doing anything about it.

A Home Office pathologist told me that is quite common, because a decomposing body does smell significantly but only for a short time.

Although I suppose the precise timescale of smell emission will be dependent on the environment, airflow around the body, and probably a few other things as well.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I've known of a couple of instances in which people have died alone in flats.

On both occasions, the neighbours noticed a strange smell, but it cleared before they got around to doing anything about it.

A Home Office pathologist told me that is quite common, because a decomposing body does smell significantly but only for a short time.

Although I suppose the precise timescale of smell emission will be dependent on the environment, airflow around the body, and probably a few other things as well.
And whether it gets eaten quickly by resident pets!
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
And whether it gets eaten quickly by resident pets!
I've not heard of that happening, although there have been animal cruelty cases in which abandoned dogs and cats have started to eat each other.

I don't suppose anyone knows if the feasting animal waits until his lunch dies of malnutrition, or actively kills it.
 

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
And whether it gets eaten quickly by resident pets!
I always have two dishes of water and a 'bite into in an emergency' bag of dried dog food available for my mutt in case of such a thing happening. Four pints of water and two kilos of food should keep him alive till the blue bottles alert the authorities that something isn't quite right!🧐
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
I've known of a couple of instances in which people have died alone in flats.

On both occasions, the neighbours noticed a strange smell, but it cleared before they got around to doing anything about it.

A Home Office pathologist told me that is quite common, because a decomposing body does smell significantly but only for a short time.

Although I suppose the precise timescale of smell emission will be dependent on the environment, airflow around the body, and probably a few other things as well.
I was walking to the shops one night a couple of years ago and saw a bit of a commotion outside a house. A group of local residents were standing in the road next to an ambulance and a police vehicle. Paramedics were standing next to the front door of the house and the police officers were banging on the door and calling through the letterbox. When there was no reply the police broke the door down and they went in with the paramedics. A couple of days later I noticed a big skip in the road immediately in front of that property. It was being filled with old furniture and other things from the house. I assumed that someone had died in the house and eventually somebody had realised that something was wrong and called the police.
 
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