Lowering Rural Speed Limits from 60 to 40

Discussion in 'General Cycling Discussions' started by sabian92, 14 Jul 2012.

  1. sabian92

    sabian92 Über Member

  2. HovR

    HovR Über Member

    Location:
    Plymouth
    I wonder how much difference it would really make. Surely the vast majority of drivers will already stick to a suitable speed limit for the road, and hence won't be affected if the speed limit was brought down to a suitable one. So will a change in speed limit really dissuade those who use the roads as their personal race track from doing so? I'm not so sure.

    Don't get me wrong, I think it's good proposal. I know of a few roads in my area which have a 60 limit, where 60 is far too fast for the conditions - But considering our rather relaxed approach to speed limit enforcement (compared to other countries such as the US), I'm not sure how effective it would be.
     
    summerdays likes this.
  3. Ian Cooper

    Ian Cooper Expat Yorkshireman

    40? That's ridiculous! Sure, it'll save a few lives, but millions will be late!
     
    mickle and User45 like this.
  4. MrJamie

    MrJamie Oaf on a Bike

    I do a lot of my cycling on NSL country roads in general the driving and speeds are alright, but there are people who dont brake or even lift off the throttle round blind corners and those clearly ignoring the speed limit altogether, which is often combined by dangerously overtaking into corners. Id imagine it would slow everyone down a bit though, even if not all within the speed limit, maybe if they were to introduce the slower limits with a campaign of enforcement i expect people would get used to it.

    I like the idea anyway, both in terms of safety all round and making cycling safer and more competitive in journey time :smile:
     
  5. numbnuts

    numbnuts Legendary Member

    Location:
    North Baddesley
    it will never happen
     
  6. Dragonwight

    Dragonwight Guest

    Im not in favour of it personally simply because those that drive like tools will continue to do so regardless of what the sign says. Motorists already know they are under an obligation to drive according to the road conditions.
     
    tyred likes this.
  7. subaqua

    subaqua What’s the point

    Location:
    Leytonstone
    without enforcement it means feck all
     
    Peteaud likes this.
  8. On some of our rural roads we've got similar 40mph zones but as subaqua says without enforcement it means feic all to most folk particularly idiots that want to speed. The other week I was going through one such section (the Uquart Cut) at nearly 41mph when I get the parp (get out of my eff'ing way). WVM then slowly (relative to me) overtakes over the solid white line and struggles to get by at the end of the Cut he then has to slam on his brakes for a right turning car blocking the road :rolleyes:
     
  9. snorri

    snorri Legendary Member

    A lot of negativity on here!
    60 to 40 might be too big a step, but a change from 60 to 50 on a local road has greatly improved the ambience for cyclists and walkers.
    One of my regular rural routes was becoming quite uncomfortable to cycle on due to volume of traffic and the fact many "law abiding" motorists drove at the NSL despite the fact this limit was set, IMO, above the safe speed for the road. Close and dangerous passes were the order of the day.
    The limit was lowered to 50mph, which seems like a safe speed for the road, and the vast majority of drivers respect the limit, close and dangerous passes reduced considerably and it became much less traumatic to cycle that route.
    There is still the ocasional racer on this road, but they are so few and far between as not to cause great concern.
    It's time we got into line with our European neighbours where the lower limits on roads used by non -motorised modes of transport make cycling a much less stressful experience than in the UK.
     
    HovR and MrJamie like this.
  10. subaqua

    subaqua What’s the point

    Location:
    Leytonstone
    oh don't get me wrong. its a fantastic idea as some of the rural roads where i grew up should never have been at NSL. over the years the lower limit zones have been extended further out from towns and villages and have had a huge positive effect on road deaths.
     
  11. lulubel

    lulubel Über Member

    Location:
    Malaga, Spain
    I think it depends on how rural we're talking about. There's a big difference between rural parts of the south east (for example) and rural North Devon, where I grew up. In the former, I think it could make a difference because there's generally more enforcement, and people are more aware of driving in and out of areas where speed limits change. In the latter, I don't think it would make any difference at all because people just drive at whatever speed they consider is suitable, and most wouldn't even know what the speed limit was if they were asked.
     
  12. Ian Cooper

    Ian Cooper Expat Yorkshireman

    Personally, I don't see why people need to go over 30mph anywhere. I mean what's the fricken rush?
     
  13. growingvegetables

    growingvegetables Guru

    Location:
    Leeds
    Can't happen fast enough, imho - the easier, more flexible, and speedy the process for implementing 20mph limits on urban roads, or 40mph on certain rural roads the better.
     
  14. Make 'em slow down anyway possible, i say!!:stop:Most of the ~'#'@ are on their mobiles, fiddling with their stupid car gadgets or oblivious to their surroundings! If they valued other road users lives as much as their stupid cars we wouldn't have as many "accidents"!:angry:
     
  15. The Irish took the opportunity to do such when they went metric, roads which were 60mph became 80kph (around 50mph) and whilst it wasn't perfect (you still get numpties) on the whole I believe it was positive in safety terms and was accepted and I suppose if just one life was saved it was a good thing.
     
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