Music CD To SD Card... Techno-Luddites Guide Required

Darius_Jedburgh

Über Member
Use windows media player to RIP them. Then copy to card.
(Don't ask because I don't know. It's what I was told to do and it worked for me!)
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Traditional CDs (about 16-20 tracks on a disc) use a different format (WAV?) that takes up far more space than the MP3 files we are so used to now.

It's been a while since I last ripped anything from my CD collection as I also buy via amazon nowadays and get the physical CD as well as a downloadable, ready converted MP3 copy. Before anyone asks, I like to own the physical copy as security against me accidently killing the hard drive I have my music stored on. Sure I have multiple copies of many of the albums dotted about on various devices but sods law dictates that should the worst happen I am bound to lose a couple of the hardest to replace or most favourite albums.

When you rip (copy and convert to MP3) the album you need to select an appropriate quality or bit-rate to ensure good sound reproduction. Too low and you will have tiny file sizes that allow you to fit more on a device, but at the cost of quality. I think you can start as low as 64(bps?) and go up in steps to 128, 256, and maybe 412 or more. I usually plump for 256 as file size isn't as critical now we are not trying to store them on CDs or DVDs.

Hope this helps :okay:

EDIT: If you purchase via amazon I think the downloads remain available to access as long as you keep your account, so if you do lose your e-copy somehow you haven't lost it and can just download it again.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Has the laptop got an SD drive or is it just a reader, I'd also look as to whether the stereo in the car has a USB port if so just plug an MP3 player in.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Has the laptop got an SD drive or is it just a reader, I'd also look as to whether the stereo in the car has a USB port if so just plug an MP3 player in.
@Richard A Thackeray , is this for a VAG vehicle? My wife's Audi has an inbuilt hard drive but the only way to load music to it is via an SD card slot so rather than using the common USB memory stick to transfer music we have to have a PC/laptop capable of writing to the SD card, luckily we do, but why they didn't just use USB like the rest of the world I don't know.

My Landrover radio is a mechless MP3/DAB unit with removable face. All my MP3 music lives on a tiny thumb nail USB memory that permanently lives plugged into the fascia and is so small it protrudes no more than the buttons and is removed from the car when the radio front is removed. The USB just about sticks out enough to allow you to pull it out with your fingernails.
 
Traditional CDs (about 16-20 tracks on a disc) use a different format (WAV?) that takes up far more space than the MP3 files we are so used to now.

It's been a while since I last ripped anything from my CD collection as I also buy via amazon nowadays and get the physical CD as well as a downloadable, ready converted MP3 copy. Before anyone asks, I like to own the physical copy as security against me accidently killing the hard drive I have my music stored on. Sure I have multiple copies of many of the albums dotted about on various devices but sods law dictates that should the worst happen I am bound to lose a couple of the hardest to replace or most favourite albums.

When you rip (copy and convert to MP3) the album you need to select an appropriate quality or bit-rate to ensure good sound reproduction. Too low and you will have tiny file sizes that allow you to fit more on a device, but at the cost of quality. I think you can start as low as 64(bps?) and go up in steps to 128, 256, and maybe 412 or more. I usually plump for 256 as file size isn't as critical now we are not trying to store them on CDs or DVDs.

Hope this helps :okay:

EDIT: If you purchase via amazon I think the downloads remain available to access as long as you keep your account, so if you do lose your e-copy somehow you haven't lost it and can just download it again.
"Whoosh!!!!!"
That's most if it passing over my head:wacko:


Has the laptop got an SD drive or is it just a reader, I'd also look as to whether the stereo in the car has a USB port if so just plug an MP3 player in.
All I can say it has a slot for an SD card on the side


@Richard A Thackeray , is this for a VAG vehicle? My wife's Audi has an inbuilt hard drive but the only way to load music to it is via an SD card slot so rather than using the common USB memory stick to transfer music we have to have a PC/laptop capable of writing to the SD card, luckily we do, but why they didn't just use USB like the rest of the world I don't know.
2011 Octavia, & has a SD card slot
(centre of CD slot)


532810
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
"Whoosh!!!!!"
That's most if it passing over my head:wacko:



All I can say it has a slot for an SD card on the side




2011 Octavia, & has a SD card slot
(centre of CD slot)


View attachment 532810
Could well have a built in hard drive then? If it does you need to use the SD card to transfer the music files and then copy/import them to the head unit. Once this is done you can remove the SD card. If there is no built in HD then the SD card will need to be fitted while playing music from it. Your car owners manual should explain it in a straightforward manner.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
I use WMA witch takes up a bit more space, but is a lossless format. Having said that, while you can tell the difference between WAV and even MP3 with a high sample rate using good quality headphones, I doubt it matters much in a car with all the engine, wind and tyre noise.
 
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