My advice to newbies.

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by andyfromotley, 30 Jun 2008.

  1. SoloOwners

    SoloOwners Member

    I've got a couple of old road bikes that I bought for $40 USD each and refurbished. A 24" frame LeTour and a 20" frame Huffy for backup and guests.
    I notice that a lot of road and paved trail riders strip their machines down to nothing. I've a bottle holder, extra reflectors, tube & repair, hand pump, LCD torch, etc.
    I don't mind the extra weight. It's much the same theory as runners sometimes putting on ankle and wrist weight.
    My thought is that I just get a little more out of my workout.

    bicyclessm.jpg
     
    Liz Su likes this.
  2. GuyBoden

    GuyBoden Fat, old bloke, on an old bike, pedalling slowly.

    Location:
    Warrington
    Learn to maintain your bike, give it a 10min check it over before every long(ish) ride, that's the tyres, wheels, brakes, gears, chain and make sure nothing is loose.
     
  3. david k

    david k Hi

    Location:
    North West
    Spin your legs faster than feels natural at first, use lower gears than feels right, it will eventually feel normal and you will get less thigh muscle burn from stomping then stopping, stomping then stopping.

    So think spin in circles faster than a walking tempo and slower than a sprint
     
    cubey likes this.
  4. Simon_73

    Simon_73 New Member

    Many thanks, very informative.
     
  5. Moojii

    Moojii New Member

    Location:
    Kettering
    Newbie here.

    Not cycled for nigh on 20 years and my wife and I feel it's time to lose some weight and get out there. Our 8 year old has been badgering us too as she loves cycling.

    Went to oi local shop at the weekend and bought a forme peak trail 3 for me and a python Daytona for the missus.

    Can't wait to pick them up next Saturday.
     
    Dor, Alan O and Daddy Pig like this.
  6. Alan O

    Alan O Über Member

    Location:
    Liverpool
    I started cycling again last year after a similar break, and it's one of the best things I've done - I really wish I'd got back to it a lot sooner. Enjoy your new bikes, your return to cycling, and your time at this very friendly and helpful forum.

    Alan
     
  7. Philhh

    Philhh Active Member

    You are so right-Getting the right fit is really important for men but especially for women-the girls my lady cycles with all have cross bar brakes for example -because shimano levers are too big for their hands (she has campaignolo which are thinner) she has a ladies saddle and a shorter stem and it took quite a bit of time getting her bike right but now it is right she loves it (them-a ribble 725 and genesis 30)This can make all the difference to your enjoyment look at Victoria Pendleton comments and british cyclings solutions regarding saddle positions for girls if you are fitting a bike up for a lady
     
  8. GuyBoden

    GuyBoden Fat, old bloke, on an old bike, pedalling slowly.

    Location:
    Warrington
    Dark Sunglasses can at times make it difficult to see pot holes in the shady parts of the road, obviously this can be a dangerous combination.
     
    Last edited: 30 Mar 2017
    hepburn likes this.
  9. Bonacentral

    Bonacentral Guest

    If you are new or 20 years off search Google for articles and what type of bike you will need.

    MTBs were all the rage in my youth in the 90s. Everyone had them. The closest I ever got to a "mountain" was the heath an old BMX track and old railway lines. I guess we were all young, dumb and full of come and expended excessive energy that never really got us anywhere!!

    If the majority of your riding is going to be on roads or cyclepaths you really don't need suspension.

    For most people a double - 2 chainrings with 18 - 22 gears is more than enough.

    For most people a COMPACT double with chainrings 50 and 34 teeth is more than enough

    You are infinitely better off losing weight off your body before you start paying to lose it off your bike.

    Get a decent lock. Get decent lights - and use them and ensure they stay charged or you get batteries. Use a rear in the daytime.

    Remember to use the "lifesaver" - look over your right shoulder and basically have good vision and awareness. The amount of drivers who don't is dangerous.

    You don't need a bell. If you on a shared path and someone isn't aware of you slow down and say "excuse me"....

    Hopefully you get the gist haha!!
     
    hepburn and Pasydron like this.
  10. emilyisfun

    emilyisfun New Member

    Hey Thank you so much for this Andy, this post was SUPERRRRR helpfull!

    Agreeed, probrbly shoudl be, this can help allot of peolpe
     
  11. Ociessly

    Ociessly Member

    Hi, I'm a newbie, and thank you for advice. Actually i wanted to start the professional cycling era in my life, but not so long ago i started to have some health problems related with sleep disorder and i just stopped my goal, and started to treat my disorder, but I'm sure that soon I'm going to feel much better, and all the advises that you have shared here are going to be useful for me. Thank you !:rolleyes:
     
  12. I've had a bike for years but would still class myself as a newbie. Very good advice :-). My question is though - how do you know when you're ready to go from a MTB to road bike? I've found that my MTB with road orientated tyres is just too heavy for long rides, but still don't know if Hybrid or Road is the way forward.
     
  13. stoatsngroats

    stoatsngroats Veteran

    Location:
    West Sussex
    Matts, I would say it depends on what you'll be doing most, as road cycling is better than hybrid if all you cycle is along made roads. If venturing off tarmac, maybe a hybrid, but consider where you'll ride most?
    I'm just selling my road bike, as my partner prefers tracks and unmade roads due to limited confidence, but my road bike has been great for 13 mile e/w commutes. A hybrid would have been ok, but the racer is much better!
    We'll be getting emtb soon, and that will be the end of my road days!
     
  14. Wildsnoopster

    Wildsnoopster New Member

    Location:
    Surrey
    Very helpful. This aligns to most that I have read. However I have a range of questions that stem from the first question you are asked as a new rider. What is the purpose.

    So my purpose is initially to provide a rest for my legs when running. So I run 4 times a week and want one of those to be a cycle to reduce impact injuries. I am not cycle fit but have run marathons in the past so am not generally unfit.

    However my plan is that this bike will also be used for a commute into London once or twice a week once I have developed some cycle fitness and then there is also a desire to try out a triathlon at some point.

    Will a roadbike with the appropriate eyelets for mudguards be OK for this. The commute would be c30k each way.

    Also I wanted to ask what are the essentials to get other than the bike? I have cycle vest, padded shorts, shoes, lights and waterproofs down but there is so much to choose from and I'm a bit sceptical of what is needed and what is just cycle shops trying to make a profit.
     
  15. stoatsngroats

    stoatsngroats Veteran

    Location:
    West Sussex
    [QUOTE="Wildsnoopster, post: 4925626, member: 52725]
    Will a roadbike with the appropriate eyelets for mudguards be OK for this. The commute would be c30k each way.

    Also I wanted to ask what are the essentials to get other than the bike? I have cycle vest, padded shorts, shoes, lights and waterproofs down but there is so much to choose from....[/QUOTE]

    I use one of those removable mudguards, cannot remember which, and it's been fine.
    I would have a spare tube, multi tool, scabs, etc, and a pump and co2 cylinder, all in the seat bag.
    Oh, and a banana too!
     
    Wildsnoopster likes this.
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