Shared pavement conflict

ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
My speed on shared paths tends to be close to the ebike cutoff speed - 15mph
but only if there are no walkers around - especially walkers with things like kids or dogs
I only approach slower people at a much slower pace. If they seem sensible and have clearly seen me - and there is a lot of space - the I would probably pass at a maximum of 10 mph. people with dogs or kids - then just over walking speed would be normal
if people seem confused then I stop

There can be a problem on narrow paths - there is one here which is shared and part of the Trans Penine trail - that is only about 3 foot wide. AT this time of year I can go off the path and pass on the grass - but in winter if I did that I would either get stuck or, at best, leave deep tracks in the grass - so I basically have to stay behind some walkers or wait until they come to a bit where there is dry grass to go to while I pass.
But it is a shared path - so I have to be polite and it is up to other people if they make way for me or not
which is kinda like cyclists on a narrow road.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Shared pathways are a problem for all the reasons stated in this thread. I often wonder if they should not adopt the rule:
  • Cyclists keep left. Pedestrians keep right.
That already is a rule in the Highway Code, along with keeping mutts on leads on cycleways like all highways, but in practice they will walk anywhere unless you are planning a big increase in policing and I suggest there are a lot of motorists more worth policing before we worry about careless walkers.
 
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ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
If only everyone stuck to the same rules!!

I am not too concerned about walkers going left or right - but it does annoy me when a cyclist insists on going to their right
This is the UK people - we drive on the left!!!
(naturally this doesn;t apply when there are other obstacles which affact the decision!)
 
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ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
In my experience, it's better to avoid shared paths if you can.
Shared paths are fine for pooteling along enjoying the fresh air and stuff - and being aware of avoiding all other traffic
so if there are walker, dogs, kids, other cyclists etc etc then you are not going to get a simple single speed ride
but it can be nice

but if you want to get somewhere by a certain time or want to maintain a reasonable speed then there comes a point where they are not worth while
and if the non-cycling traffic gets above a certain level then they are not really suitable for cycling at all

so it depends on the path and the circumstances
and on your circumstances
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
but if you want to get somewhere by a certain time or want to maintain a reasonable speed then there comes a point where they are not worth while
This isn't really true if the cycleway is built to standard and you don't sprint like Cav. The good ones are very useful shortcuts.

Some of the iffy ones are still useful shortcuts if you have a suitable bike, but it is annoying that they exclude some, most often road bikes (due to poor surfaces) or e-bikes, trikes, tandems or cargo bikes (due to barriers).

so it depends on the path and the circumstances
and on your circumstances
Amen. It is this inconsistency which is most annoying when touring in England. You cannot really trust many cycleways on first use.
 

Solocle

Senior Member
Location
Dorset / Oxford
This isn't really true if the cycleway is built to standard and you don't sprint like Cav. The good ones are very useful shortcuts.

Some of the iffy ones are still useful shortcuts if you have a suitable bike, but it is annoying that they exclude some, most often road bikes (due to poor surfaces) or e-bikes, trikes, tandems or cargo bikes (due to barriers).


Amen. It is this inconsistency which is most annoying when touring in England. You cannot really trust many cycleways on first use.
The local one, NCN 25, is a gravelled railbed. Quite doable on a road bike, although the bumps can get tiring - I did in fact use it 200 km in to my first 300k audax. But when I used it yesterday, I had GP5000s on... the outcome was a puncture in less than two miles. I didn't need to feel around the inside of the tyre, as there was still a piece of gravel stuck into it!
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
but if you want to get somewhere by a certain time or want to maintain a reasonable speed then there comes a point where they are not worth while
Cycling works fine as a means of utility transport if you are realistic about the amount of time it will take to cover a particular distance. In Greater London, if I'm planning to ride from A to B and it actually matters what time I arrive, then I allow six minutes for every mile of the distance. I can be lucky with the wind direction or get several green lights on the trot, and do it in comfortably less, but I'm very rarely later than I wanted to be if I reckon on 10 mph. If I set an unrealistic target like 15 mph, I would have to ride unsafely to avoid stopping, and would still probably not make it anyway.
Just because you can achieve a brisk pace on a clear open road on a calm day riding an easy-rolling bike, doesnt mean you should plan your journey times based on ideal conditions which rarely occur in real life.
 

ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
Cycling works fine as a means of utility transport if you are realistic about the amount of time it will take to cover a particular distance. In Greater London, if I'm planning to ride from A to B and it actually matters what time I arrive, then I allow six minutes for every mile of the distance. I can be lucky with the wind direction or get several green lights on the trot, and do it in comfortably less, but I'm very rarely later than I wanted to be if I reckon on 10 mph. If I set an unrealistic target like 15 mph, I would have to ride unsafely to avoid stopping, and would still probably not make it anyway.
Just because you can achieve a brisk pace on a clear open road on a calm day riding an easy-rolling bike, doesnt mean you should plan your journey times based on ideal conditions which rarely occur in real life.
That applies to anything
including cars and buses
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Average car speeds are 7.1 MPH in central London, and 11.6 in greater London, each down roughly 1 MPH over the preceeding decade.

So if you want to get somewhere on time in Larndon then using a car isn't as realistic an option as a bicycle. Unless you're infirm, or have no limbs.
 
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