Shared pavement conflict

steverob

Veteran
Location
Buckinghamshire
I've had a guy on a mobility scooter castigate me while I was stationary at the side of a cycle path (I had stopped initially to let some people pass in the opposite direction, plus was also taking that as an opportunity to have a quick drink) telling me in no uncertain terms "bikes aren't allowed down here!"

I tried to point out that his scooter was at that very moment, right next to a sign stating that we were on a National Cycle Network path, but he was only interested in grumbling about "bloody cyclists" as he drove away at a speed probably greater than I was managing on my bike anyway!
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
I've had a guy on a mobility scooter castigate me while I was stationary at the side of a cycle path (I had stopped initially to let some people pass in the opposite direction, plus was also taking that as an opportunity to have a quick drink) telling me in no uncertain terms "bikes aren't allowed down here!"

I tried to point out that his scooter was at that very moment, right next to a sign stating that we were on a National Cycle Network path, but he was only interested in grumbling about "bloody cyclists" as he drove away at a speed probably greater than I was managing on my bike anyway!
I have spent years developing a response scenario for just such a situation.

When something like that happens to me I just say, "f$%& off!"

Under no circumstances should one attempt to engage these fools in rational argument.
 
OP
Arjimlad

Arjimlad

Tights of Cydonia
Location
South Glos
Only time I cycled in that area of Bristol, I was visiting a friend in Filton, cycled down from Oxford. I detoured across the Severn Bridge first...

I went straight down the A38. Not only that, but I was passed by a group of cyclists while doing so! :laugh:

Then, from Abbey Wood, I cycled on the A4174 back to the A38 to head south.
Yes that stretch is not as bad & the shared pavement bit is awfully here & there. The A38 has very little cycling infra and the bits of painted lane are usually viewed as free parking despite double yellows, because they've never been properly enforced. This bit is east of the M32 and something of a racetrack for the local yoofs.
 

rivers

How far can I go?
Location
Bristol
Shared pathways are a problem for all the reasons stated in this thread. I often wonder if they should not adopt the rule:
  • Cyclists keep left. Pedestrians keep right.
The thinking here is that a cyclist approaching pedestrians head-on can see if the pathway beyond the pedestrians is clear and, if it is, move to the right to pass the pedestrians. If the pathway beyond the pedestrians is not clear, the cyclist can stop.

Importantly, under this arrangement pedestrians have no excuse for being unaware of approaching cyclists. In addition, a stopping cyclist effectively warns pedestrians of a cyclist approaching from behind. The adoption of presumed liability might help this arrangement. https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/presumed-liability.273781/
Most shared paths aren't wide enough for cyclists and pedestrians to be moving in opposite directions in the same "lane". On shared pathways everyone should keep left (much like cyclists do on the road). When it is safe to overtake, the cyclist can then move out and around the pedestrian. I wouldn't want to have to keep stopping if I'm trying to get to work.
 

rogerzilla

Legendary Member
I got a right roasting on Faecebook for suggesting that the Lea Valley cycleway which now mars the first 5 miles or so of the Dunwich Dynamo, is horrible.

But it is. It wasn't glassed in 2020 when it was still being finished, I'll give it that (bet it is glassed now) but:

- interminable waits for traffic lights at every major side road

- lots of small roads with no actual marked crossing, where Mr E17 in his blacked-out Beemer will do his best to kill you by exiting the A104

- street furniture, luggage-throwing bumps (I lost a water bottle) and wayward pedestrians

- a group sensibly using the road was engaged in a very nasty confrontation with a driver who wanted them to be on the path.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
In Milton Keynes the Redway Code exhorts peds to walk on the left, cyclists to ride on the right. This would work beautifully if they were one-way, which they're not. Clearly written by someone who never uses the routes themselves.

Unsurprisingly, the locals with a brain cell to spare tend end to stay on the left regardless of their mode of travel, the same as they would on a road.
 

ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
I generally find that a significant number of people on the local paths say "thank you" if I ring my bell 10-20 yards before I reach them and slow down
But not all
my favourite are the following
a) the pairs of people - either couples or not - where one goes left and the other right - then one of them realises what has happened and leaps across the path - just as I head for the centre
b) The ones where I ring my bell - no reaction - ring again - nada - slow down to nearly dead stop just behind and say 'excuse me' no reaction - and a few seconds later they look over their shoulder and 'suddenly notice me' and shuffle off to one side
No mate/dear you have not 'just noticed me' you were ignoring me because you were not paying attention and think you have absolute right to the whole damn path - same happens if I am walking as I walk quite fast
c) - my absolute favourite - ring bell - slow down - everyone moves over a bit - except ONE - normally someone middle age or over - who carries on regardless - say "excuse me" and suddenly they look back and jump to one side with a loud screech as if I have just appeared at a speed Cav would be proud of 5 yards from the line on the last stage of the Tour!!
WHen actually I have approached at 10 mph and dropped down to 1 mph - politely rung my bell - slowed down more - politely said 'excuse me' and almost (or actually) stopped
This is normally done with a disapproving look to their friends - who are the ones who moved over a while ago - I think it is normally done purely for effect

Pedestrians have absolute right of way (like cyclists against cars on a road)- but some seem to forget that with right come responsibilities - like maintaining some awareness of your surroundings!!!


Errr - we are allowed to rant on here arn't we?????
 

boydj

Guru
Location
Paisley
The one I get quite often is coming up behind a threesome on the cycle path, the one on the left goes right, the one on the right goes left and the one in the middle spins on the spot wondering what's going on. I usually ding or call from about 20 yards back, which gives them a chance to sort themselves out without me coming to a full stop (but ready to do so).
 

Solocle

Senior Member
Location
Dorset / Oxford
In Milton Keynes the Redway Code exhorts peds to walk on the left, cyclists to ride on the right. This would work beautifully if they were one-way, which they're not. Clearly written by someone who never uses the routes themselves.

Unsurprisingly, the locals with a brain cell to spare tend end to stay on the left regardless of their mode of travel, the same as they would on a road.
Not quite the same, as pedestrians should walk on the right on the road! Of course, the speed differentials on a shared use path are more comparable to bicycle vs car, so it makes sense for pedestrians to keep left too. But perhaps confusing.
 
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ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
On a narrow path I am always prepared for this one
dog walker one one side
dog on the other
human correctly calls the dog
dog hears its name - but is clearly not doing anything wrong so wonders what the human wants
so - obediently - turns to look at the human

Hence ending up directly across the whole damn path

Happens on almost every ride at some point

N.B. kids can do the same thing, especially on bikes or scooters
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Spot on. Pedestrians are a menace to everyone including themselves. They go out the front door and leave their brains behind. They cannot comprehend that anyone else would want to be on the same path as them, never mind pass them. That's before they plug in their earphones or start long rambling phone conversations.
Some people are just wilfully ignorant, I've had people expect me to go around them when I've been walking with a big rucksack and my GSD on a leash (off camping in Derbyshire) I developed this technique where I'd just stop and stand there and wait for them to go around me, I think it was a 'dominance' thing for them.
BTW this was on wide pavements in Leicester city centre, you could spot em as they walked towards you though, doing everything to avoid 'eye contact' :cursing:
 

ebikeerwidnes

Über Member
If anyone round here in authority asked my opinion I would tell them to get a bike and join me for a tour of the local bike lanes

They are mostly great - where they exist - but the entry and exit point and rubbish - and they haven;t really though about how many times it is reasonable to ask cyclists give way to 'other traffic' along one route by having entries and exits along the 'cycle path'.
But basically a proper effort has been made- a few changes would improve it a lot a little cost.
(posting this just in case the new City Region Mayor is reading it
or SImon O'Brian who occasionally gets refferred to as our cycling commissioner - or did at one time. Haven't heard anything about that recently???
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Shared generally works well but does mean you are going to be going more slowly on your bike as you approach pedestrians
Where's the rush? Most of the time I'm pootling along I'm doing 12 or 13 mph, and if I'm on a shared path and there's anyone else around I'm unlikely to be going at much more than 10 mph. Mobile phone zombies aside, most path users manage to co-exist OK at those sort of speeds. It's the speed freak idiot riders who think they're in a race or on a training mission who don't want to slow their pace, that seem to cause much of the aggro between walkers and riders. It's very rare for me to have a war of words with a deliberately obstructive pedestrian, most are sensible and move over so long as the rider isn't tearing around like they own the path. Dogs are generally OK too. Every cyclist ought to know that some dogs get a bit excited when they encounter a bike, so you take it easy when you pass them and approach slow enough to give their owner time to pull them in closer and control them.
 

BoldonLad

Veteran
Location
South Tyneside
..........
Shared generally works well but does mean you are going to be going more slowly on your bike as you approach pedestrians and call out in a friendly manner to let them know you are there. Some will smile back at you and facilitate your progress. Some will not be as friendly. Some will be in control of canine misguided missiles.

It is what it is.
In control?, If only!
 
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