Shark Aero Pro frame - build your own bike?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by altecsole, 5 Feb 2018.

  1. altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Velochampion are selling the Shark Aero Pro frame with a hefty discount and it got me wondering just how easy it is to buy the component parts and build a bike yourself? However, looking at the frame spec I'm lost about where to start? I'd probably want Ultegra di2 but then there are specs for the bottom bracket which mean little to me? Can anybody point me to a good source to learn about this stuff? Also, it looks like the rear brake is a direct mount below the bottom bracket, which looks pretty neat.

    Shark composites link: https://www.sharkcomposites.com/aero-pro-road-module
    Velochampion: https://www.velochampion.co.uk/coll...rk-aero-pro-stealth-ghost?variant=51241990227

    Thanks for reading and replying.
     
  2. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Senior Member

    Location:
    London
    Aero carbons aren't my cup of tea at all, but irrespective of material, one thing that really struck me was the wide variation in the geometry between sizes; with the head tube angle going from a super-slack 69.5 degrees on the XS to a racy 73.5 degrees on the XL. That's a massive difference, because sub-70 degree head tubes are traditionally found only on old-school heavy roadsters and MTB frames, whereas a 73.5 degree head tube is getting close to a full-on race bike.
     
  3. Hacienda71

    Hacienda71 Mancunian in self imposed exile in leafy Cheshire

    Location:
    Wilmslow, Cheshire
    Building a bike is pretty simple as long as you do your research first. You need to get the right chainset for the frame/bb. Most of the other bits you can spec by preference. Although looks like with this frame you need to buy direct mount brakes, possibly the seatpost which will be specific to the frame and you need to get the exact spec of the headset as there are various different tapered options.
     
    altecsole likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Many thanks. I'd spotted the bb and direct mount brakes but hadn't considered the seat post and headset. Cheers.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Thanks. I never realised that 4 degrees would make such a difference?
     
  6. Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    I bought my TT bike as a frame and built it up ( well the LBS did ) Hunt around for good deals and you can save yourself quite a few £ .
    I found buying a full groupset on special offer was cheaper than buying just the components i needed ! The deals are out there , you just have to find them .
     
    altecsole likes this.
  7. Milkfloat

    Milkfloat Veteran

    Location:
    Warwick
    In general I would agree, but the BB would not be compatible nor the brakes - so individual components would be the way to go.

    The frame linked includes seatpost so that is not a problem. For the headset, I would contact the manufacturers for details of what is required, whilst you are speaking to them ask about getting some gear hangers when you get the frame. The last thing you want is for a company to stop trading leaving you hunting around for spares.
     
    altecsole likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Thanks. Good tip on the gear hangers. Cheers.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Okay. The frames says that it's BB86. So, I guess that means I need to fit something like the Rotor BB86 press fit 4124 to make it compatible with Ultegra - http://rotorbike.com/catalog/default/rotor/triathlon/bottom-brackets/bb86/press-fit-4124.html

    Vanilla bikes offer a good system for choosing Ultegra components, including direct mount brakes, but which R8000 bottom bracket would I choose? BSA English, Italian, BB71, BB92? https://goo.gl/u4kV8U
     
  10. Milkfloat

    Milkfloat Veteran

    Location:
    Warwick
    If you are going off the Vanilla Bikes menu then you can chose either BB71 or BB92 - they are product designations used by shimano rather than BB standards. they both work for BB86.
     
    altecsole likes this.
  11. OP
    OP
    altecsole

    altecsole Regular

    Location:
    Kirkby Lonsdale
    Great. Many thanks for your help.
     
  12. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Senior Member

    Location:
    London
    The general rule of thumb, certainly on steel frames, is relaxed general utility, rigid mountain, and touring type bikes will have both head and seat tube angles of 72 degrees or under, the head angle being the one that has the most influence on the steering & handling characteristics.
    Bikes with a bit more pretension to lively handling, although not true racing bikes, tend to have frame angles above 72 degrees but below 74 degrees.
    An out and out racing bike will typically have frame geometry of at least 74 and sometimes even as high as 75 degrees.
     
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