Shimano XC Cassette - Removal Tool/Technique

Bromptonaut

Rohan Man
Location
Bugbrooke UK
I have a Claud Butler Ravana ATX MTB purchased c2002. Standard piece of kit with 27" wheels 21 gears (3*7) and rim V-Brakes.

Hubs are Quando and run fine with occasional regrease and adjustment.

My problem now is with the cassette/freehub. On Saturday, while on a ride on muddy towpaths the freewheel, more or less locked up. Improved with lubrication but there's audible grinding either within the freehub or between the cassette and the hub surface. I need to get the cassette off but cannot work out how or what tool to use.

There's no fitting for the usual splined/castellated removal tool. What appears to be the lockring has slots on its outer edges (see picture) but all I have that will go near then is a rather puny C-spanner intended for old fashioned BB lockrings.

Can anybody suggest and appropriate tool/technique for removal?

Thanks in anticipation

Simon
 

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Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Isn't that a freewheel you have? Need a 'freewheel' tool which is very like a 'normal' cassette lockring tool, but not the same.
Be warned this will very likely be a b*****d to get off (after 18 years). Once you've obtained the small tool, the best way to achieve 'lift off' is to lock the tool in a vice and fit the freewheel block onto the tool with [Edit (thank you @I like Skol ] the axis of the wheel horizontal (so gravity is holding the splines into the freewheel). Then use the wheel with tyre on it, still, (for grip) as a massive lever to unscrew - and apply torque the RIGHT way round (NB with the tool upside down).
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/determining-cassette-freewheel-type
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
 
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I like Skol

I don't think so, sonny!....
Location
Room 237
the best way to achieve 'lift off' is to lock the tool in a vice and fit the freewheel block onto the tool with the axis of the bike frame horizontal (so gravity is holding the splines together). Then use the frame as a massive lever -
Think you might be getting mixed up with bottom bracket removal? Freewheel removal just involves turning the wheel against the tool.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
You can remove it without a special tool but it involves destroying the freewheel. As yours sounds like it might be past its best it might not be such a bad idea.

Get a centre punch and put it in the little dimples of the locking ring and using a hammer hit the head of the punch undoing it clockwise. Once removed you can lift off the freewheel cogs and a load of ballbearings will fall out.
You can then use a pipe wrench or mole grip to remove the body.

BTW if you're going to be ordering tyres you'll need 26" not 27" as you stated :smile:
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Looks like a freewheel with changeable sprockets (quite rare). I'd try and get/borrow a removal tool - not the lock ring, but there should be splines on the inside of the freewheel near the axel.
 
OP
Bromptonaut

Bromptonaut

Rohan Man
Location
Bugbrooke UK
Isn't that a freewheel you have? Need a 'freewheel' tool which is very like a 'normal' cassette lockring tool, but not the same.
Be warned this will very likely be a b*****d to get off (after 18 years). Once you've obtained the small tool, the best way to achieve 'lift off' is to lock the tool in a vice and fit the freewheel block onto the tool with [Edit (thank you @I like Skol ] the axis of the wheel horizontal (so gravity is holding the splines together). Then use the wheel with tyre on it, still, (for grip) as a massive lever to unscrew - and apply torque the RIGHT way round (NB with the tool upside down).
https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/determining-cassette-freewheel-type
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
Thanks @Ajax Bay that was the answer. I'd looked at the Park Tools vid but misread what I was seeing. Actually had the right tool all the time.

Still cannot get the beggar off though.
 

I like Skol

I don't think so, sonny!....
Location
Room 237
You are turning it the correct way aren't you? A freewheel is a 'normal' thread, so with the tool in a vice and the wheel dropped into it cog side down you would need to turn the wheel 'left' or anti-clockwise.
 
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Bromptonaut

Bromptonaut

Rohan Man
Location
Bugbrooke UK
You are turning it the correct way aren't you? A freewheel is a 'normal' thread, so with the tool in a vice and the wheel dropped into it cog side down you would need to turn the wheel 'left' or anti-clockwise.
I turned it that way instinctively but will admit that when it didn't shift I had a moment's self doubt and was playing about with the tool, wheel and vice to be 100% certain.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Make yourself a 6 foot spanner. I wedged a garden hoe onto the end of the adjustable spanner which was attached to the freewheel remover tool. The hoe is still 'squashed' at the handle end, just in-case I ever need another huge spanner again ! :laugh:
 
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