Should a cyclist be allowed on the road

Vikeonabike

CC Neighbourhood Police Constable
Without first proving they understand the highway code?

Marin, Lee, please feel free to join in!:angry:
Should a cyclist by right have to pass either a written or practical test before venturing out onto the road?

If they did, how would it be implemented, what would be the benefits, could you license cyclists?
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
I would be very interested to know what other countries do about this.
 

Brains

Legendary Member
Location
Greenwich
Every schoolchild should take the Cycling Proficiency Test at about the age of 10-11.
I'd also be in favor of an additional test at about the age of 15-16

Whilst this is not the same as saying Cyclists need to take a test to be on the road, it would mean the majority of cyclists would have a test certificate of some sort

However, the one bit I would ensure is that if you did not have your cycling Proficiency test certificate, you could not apply for a motorcycle license.
Only once you had passed your motorcycle test and had about a year of experience could you then apply for a car license, and so it goes up, larger vechiles is one year after you have passed the test for the smaller vehicle
 

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
Ian H said:
Yup, and the same for pedestrians, runners, skateboarders, etc.
...and don't forget motorists!

"Yes" I hear you saying, "but they already take tests". The only problem is, in Australia at least (and no doubt in other countries too), these so-called driving tests are a joke, and wouldn't measure up to any university or even high-school examination standards. They also tend (in Australia at least) to merely gloss over the cycling-related rules, so motorists go out into the world with their shiny new P-plates and b#gger all understanding of how to share the roads with cyclists.

[/rant]
 

gaz

Cycle Camera TV
Location
South Croydon
victor said:
...and don't forget motorists!

"Yes" I hear you saying, "but they already take tests". The only problem is, in Australia at least (and no doubt in other countries too), these so-called driving tests are a joke, and wouldn't measure up to any university or even high-school examination standards. They also tend (in Australia at least) to merely gloss over the cycling-related rules, so motorists go out into the world with their shiny new P-plates and b#gger all understanding of how to share the roads with cyclists.

[/rant]
I thought the testing period in aussie was really long, don't you have to log a certain amount of hours? compared to the UK you could get your license weeks after your 17 with very little driving experience.
 

bianchi1

Guru
Location
malverns
I cant think of a way to have a test that is appropriate for 5-8 year olds , who should be able to cycle to school ect, as well as say a 40 year old wanting to start cycle touring. Unfortunately the ability to stay safe while cycling comes only through experience and time on the road.

People that break the rules of the road while cycling tend to know the rules, just choose to ignore them. Any pre school child knows that you stop when the lights are on red. They used to play traffic light games at my kids playgroup!!
 

dondare

Über Member
Location
London
Vikeonabike said:
Without first proving they understand the highway code?

Marin, Lee, please feel free to join in!:angry:
Should a cyclist by right have to pass either a written or practical test before venturing out onto the road?

If they did, how would it be implemented, what would be the benefits, could you license cyclists?
There is more than enough legislation in this country.
 

slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
dondare said:
There is more than enough legislation in this country.
Quite.
 

bianchi1

Guru
Location
malverns
tdr1nka said:
The Govt approved 'Bikeability' cycle training is given to nine and ten year olds and covers riding on the roads in parts two & three.
My eldest did it last year and my youngest is doing it next week. The question is should i do it as i have never done any cycle training. What benefit would it be to me?

If cyclists need to be qualified it would have to be a standard test and who would it be aimed at?
 

tdr1nka

Taking the biscuit
Speaking as one, there are training instructors abound who will take you through your paces but as things stand, it's down to the individual whether they feel they want/need cycle training, or even know where to look/ask.

I had been cycling in London for 20 years and I took a lesson myself to see what the instructors job entailed.
As it happened I found I had a few bad habits and I have since corrected them.

In answer to your question, I'd get your kids to take you through what they have learned, there is always something a cyclist could learn or revise.:biggrin:

Ideally a general road test would be great but would have to be voluntary and funded some how, licences are near uninforcable, eg: how many here ride on canal towpaths without a licence(available free)from BWB?
 

NigC

New Member
Location
Surrey
I was almost tempted to start this subject a day or two ago.... but I was too scared! :biggrin:

Hmmmm, the more I've thought about it recently, the more I think what a good idea this would be. But of course, I'm thinking in terms of how it would impact me, as an adult - and I would welcome it. I would also welcome it as the father of a 7-year old daughter who will one day want to ride to school (actually, she wants to do it now, but it's just not possible).

BUT, there must be tens of thousands (I'm guessing here, so don't hold that against me) of kids who love cycling to school or to their mates house who may well see things very differently - plus a lot of parents who would feel the same. I can hear it now: "why does my kid have to take a bloody stupid test just so he can ride to school half a mile away? He already know how to ride!".

How on earth could it be policed? I think it could work - sure, a lot of cyclists won't be happy about it, but I think it could be done. Without licence plates for bikes, it would be much more difficult to police it, but once a cyclist has been stopped for an offence, it's pretty much the same as for motorists.

A thought: Could some kind of road cycling test be compulsory for those cyclists who have been cautioned for any cycling-related offence? Something along the lines of "you've proved you don't understand how to ride safely, now you must prove you can".

Another thought: What does the bikeability scheme actually teach (I took cycling proficiency when I was young and my daughter hasn't got there yet, so I don't know)? I'm assuming it teaches how to ride a bike first and foremost, then how to ride safely on the roads. Could it be taken one stage further and made compulsory before allowing anyone to cycle on the roads, thereby effectively licencing a cyclist at this point? And could this really work for children and adults alike?

I think the simple truth is that if we'd all grown up with some kind of cycling licence, we'd all be OK with it, but now - I see too much opposition.
 

TheDoctor

Europe Endless
Moderator
Location
Stevenage
I'd actually prefer the existing traffic laws to be enforced before anyone tries to introduce new ones.
Especially ones that address a problem that isn't really there, except in the minds of Daily Mail hacks.
 

BentMikey

Rider of Seolferwulf
Location
South London
You lot must be 'kin joking!!! Cycling isn't dangerous, and it's defo not dangerous to other-than-cyclists. The more cyclists you have out there the more safe it becomes for everyone. Enforced licensing and training is a load of bawlocks, because the net result is that it'll be less safe for everyone, I suspect.
 
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