Simpsons Cycles - End of an LBS era

Blurb

Über Member
http://www.camdennewjournal.com/news/2015/apr/victims-internet-simpsons-cycles-set-leave-camden

Another well respected LBS succumbs.
Detoured via their shop today to have a look around and had a short chat with Dean Simpson, and it's much like the article says. High street rents/rates, internet competition, customers only coming into the shop to gain knowledge then buying online.

Anyway, if you're in the area it might be worth a little visit

I wished him good luck and left hoping he would be able to relocate and set up another cycle related service locally.
 

Arrowfoot

Veteran
And he is right - LBS is a showroom and people buy online. End of an era. When the butcher, barber and other tradesmen began to close their shops there wa tinge of sadness and you wondered why.
 
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T4tomo

Veteran
Very sad, best place in London for brompton spares. I hope they carry on in cheaper premises somewhere
 

classic33

Legendary Member
And he is right - LBS is a showroom and people buy online. End of an era. When the butcher, barber and other tradesmen began to close their shops there is tinge of sadness and you wondered why.
Why? I'd prefer to use the smaller shops. One of the final nails in the coffin for butchers was the Foot & Mouth outbreak in 2001. Also smaller ones still. Two thirds of the butchers in the local market were closed up by the end of the year.
Never been to an online barber, how does that compare to one in the street?
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
I wonder how many former high street shops are setting up as internet seller operating out of a warehouse? Ribble Cycles have done it successfully and have just moved to a bigger warehouse as business is so good. Even lesser-known sellers like High on Bikes have warehouses full of stock - I've been there and bought stuff across their counter, same as you can do at Ribble.
 

Arrowfoot

Veteran
Why? I'd prefer to use the smaller shops. One of the final nails in the coffin for butchers was the Foot & Mouth outbreak in 2001. Also smaller ones still. Two thirds of the butchers in the local market were closed up by the end of the year.
Never been to an online barber, how does that compare to one in the street?
I too prefer smaller shops but not sustainable. As to Barber, closure of such shops has led people to start DYI.
 

MisterStan

Label Required
I too prefer smaller shops but not sustainable. As to Barber, closure of such shops has led people to start DYI.
There are more salons opening up round here (men's/women's/mixed) than there have ever been. We had a new butchers open up a couple of years ago in town and another one locally. They are always busy.

They are sustainable but only if people use them, I get the impression (at least locally) that a lot of people have realised that supermarkets aren't always cheaper and often when they are cheaper isn't always more cheerful. We have a market in town twice a week, plus two farmers markets each month. I also think people are starting to lose faith/trust in the supermarkets.
 

shouldbeinbed

Rollin' along
Location
Manchester way
That's a shame, they have been my folder spares and parts supplier of choice for many years (ironically as an internet customer). I don't frequent London but had it in mind to go and say hi if I was down that way.
 

subaqua

What’s the point
Location
Leytonstone
I too prefer smaller shops but not sustainable. As to Barber, closure of such shops has led people to start DYI.
I always did do DIY on my hair, with the rare exception of haircut day before wedding where i went to the barbers where i grew up and had a proper shave , i didn't pay anyway as the guy was a schoolmate and i did work for him on his house gratis . he still cuts my dads hair for free 16 years on.
 

Freds Dad

Veteran
Location
Gawsworth.
Sad to see anothe LBS close. Peak Cycles in Macclesfield are extending their premises. They are a great shop and are always happy to give advice even if you don't purchase every time you go in.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Sad to hear of a bike shop going, but that's progress. Peoples shopping habits change with the times and the internet has taken over as the market of choice for many consumers. But there will always be a demand for the high street shop, fewer in number but whether it be the butcher, baker or candlestick maker there will be enough of a demand to keep them viable. The trick is to offer the type of personal service that can't be got online and there are many thriving bike shops who have mastered the art of that.
 
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B

Blurb

Über Member
The trick is to offer the type of personal service that can't be got online and there are many thriving bike shops who have mastered the art of that.
I think that's part of the answer, but issues such as business rates,parking restrictions etc. are a major obstacle.

Whilst I was in the shop, and it was only for a short time, a few people came in and out and they were addressed by the staff by first name, so they did seem to have a connection with the locals.

My usual LBS is four miles away within spitting distance of a big Halfords and I regularly use the "LBS" for the stuff I have trouble doing at home.
I don't look forward to being left to the mercy of the big chains for this work.
 

Arrowfoot

Veteran
They are sustainable but only if people use them, I get the impression (at least locally) that a lot of people have realised that supermarkets aren't always cheaper and often when they are cheaper isn't always more cheerful. We have a market in town twice a week, plus two farmers markets each month. I also think people are starting to lose faith/trust in the supermarkets.
Agree on the supermarket quality, seems to getting worse.Got to make an attempt to get out there and try more options.
 

vernon

Harder than Ronnie Pickering
Location
Meanwood, Leeds
Sad to hear of a bike shop going, but that's progress. Peoples shopping habits change with the times and the internet has taken over as the market of choice for many consumers. But there will always be a demand for the high street shop, fewer in number but whether it be the butcher, baker or candlestick maker there will be enough of a demand to keep them viable. The trick is to offer the type of personal service that can't be got online and there are many thriving bike shops who have mastered the art of that.
Woodrup Cycles here in Leeds is one such example. It has expanded its floor space and staff numbers over the past ten or so years that I have been using it and offers a very friendly service to all customers irrespective of their spending power. The hand built frames and bikes side of the business is very buoyant.

Bob Jackson cycles on the other hand closed the retail side of the business and now focusses on frame building and frame painting. The aloofness of the shop staff might have contributed to the dwindling number of retail customers and Woodrups were able to take advantage of being only a few miles down the road and serving an overlapping catchment area.
 
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