Snapped Chain requires new cassette?

OP
JuliaT

JuliaT

Active Member
Location
London
£60 extra for cassette and fitting sounds a lot? What groupset is it?
If you only change the chain, you may hasten it’s demise on a worn cassette but up to you. It’ll just mean another £20 potentially but you could the. source the parts cheaper online and ask a shop to fit (mine only charges another fiver if I get the parts)
I am not saying it is cheap/expensive because have never bought it, so don't have a reference to compare. I am concerned as that is not my regular bike shop and in some areas of London they try to scam you easily, that's why I was asking. I don't know the chain he is putting, but I saw the cassette was shimano of 9 speeds...nothing more that I know. I will probably keep an eye on it and will take it to my trusted regular bike shop. But thanks!
 

bigjim

Guru
Location
Manchester. UK
I buy 8 or 9 speed chain and cassettes for about £20 total. It's an easy DIY job to fit them yourself if you have the simple tools needed. It might be worth buying these if you see yourself as a regular cyclist. The cost of the tools are probably less than the labour charge for one change. There are lots of YouTube videos that talk you through the process.
 

Paulus

Started young, and still going.
Location
Barnet,
I am not saying it is cheap/expensive because have never bought it, so don't have a reference to compare. I am concerned as that is not my regular bike shop and in some areas of London they try to scam you easily, that's why I was asking. I don't know the chain he is putting, but I saw the cassette was shimano of 9 speeds...nothing more that I know. I will probably keep an eye on it and will take it to my trusted regular bike shop. But thanks!
Shimano and KMC chains are quite cheap and will work fine.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Reasonable precaution IMO. He's seen the cassette, we haven't. A broken chain is basically a flail for its last few seconds and could even have done some damage he's spotted.

As for replacement cost, if he's replacing like for like, some of the Shimano 9 speed cassettes are damned expensive. If you ask and don't mind slightly different gearing, there may be a cheaper option. Remember that it's not only the parts but fitting labour too, though, although it isn't a long job.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
A good tip to check a cassette with a new chain, before it starts skipping, is to crouch by the side of the bike pull the bake brake lever and turn the pedals. If the chain is riding up/moving a lot on the cassette then it is worn.
Can anyone think of a test before fitting a new chain, though? The £3 0.75/1.0 chain check tools seem as good as I've heard: the more easily the .75 drops through, the more likely a new cassette is needed. If the 1.0 drops through, it's a cert.
 

Milkfloat

Veteran
Location
Midlands
Can anyone think of a test before fitting a new chain, though? The £3 0.75/1.0 chain check tools seem as good as I've heard: the more easily the .75 drops through, the more likely a new cassette is needed. If the 1.0 drops through, it's a cert.
Measuring the chain is easy and in this case the change has been done already. I agree a chain checker tool is invaluable to me.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
I hear the so many links to the 12" mark on a ruler is far more precise.
It probably is, but requires the chain to be placed under tension, the ruler to be held steady against it and the maximum measurements to be remembered or maths to be done, like is it time to replace at a sixteenth of an inch over or an eighth? ;) Checkers are a much easier test for non-mechanics.
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
He did ask, but I have no idea and he couldn't measure it bcos the old chain is in a bin where it broke... I guess he was giving me a safe advise
Worth keeping the old chain, so you can get the length of the new chain exactly the same. That is if everthing was working smoothly.

Worth also, mastering the DIY needed and carrying a chain splitter tool and a quick link with you, so you can do roadside fixes to get you home.
 
OP
JuliaT

JuliaT

Active Member
Location
London
Worth keeping the old chain, so you can get the length of the new chain exactly the same. That is if everthing was working smoothly.

Worth also, mastering the DIY needed and carrying a chain splitter tool and a quick link with you, so you can do roadside fixes to get you home.
Yes...I just learned that....well, I'll know better next time!
 

PaulSB

Legendary Member
On both my winter and summer bikes I change cassette and chain (probably twice) annually. I like the reliability and security of knowing my drive train is in very good condition.

The only two mechanical things I can reliably do on the road is change a tube or fix a chain. On a well maintained bike that should be all you need. Practice at home, carry the tools and you will be fine.
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
On both my winter and summer bikes I change cassette and chain (probably twice) annually. I like the reliability and security of knowing my drive train is in very good condition.

The only two mechanical things I can reliably do on the road is change a tube or fix a chain. On a well maintained bike that should be all you need. Practice at home, carry the tools and you will be fine.
I do the same. Once a year, new cassette and new chain. I just cant be bothered with the faff of measuring chains v cassettes.
 
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