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SPD on road shoes, a good idea??

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Nick1979, 30 Jun 2008.

  1. Nick1979

    Nick1979 New Member

    Location:
    London (SW11)
    I am using SPD (plain, not SPD-SL or anything) and just 'accidently' bought a pair of Time RXC road shoes in a LBS (it was a real bargain!).

    I plan to move to Time or Look road pedals at some point but in the meantime, does it make sense to install my SPD cleats on my road shoes? They seems to be compatible with both 3 and 2 screws systems.
    As the cleat will be completely exposed, I will ruin it in no time right?
     
  2. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    my winter shoes are road with spd and they've borne up well after a year, I do a bit of to and fro walking across tarmac and paving, suck it and see, cleats aren't exactly irreplaceable
     
  3. Nick1979

    Nick1979 New Member

    Location:
    London (SW11)
    Thanks Tynan, you're right about the cleats! I will give it a go.
     
  4. feckless

    feckless Über Member

    Location:
    Not all that close
    Since SPD cleats are steel, I wouldn't worry about the shoes but floors may suffer.

    I used to run SPDs with road shoes and the only real issue was with walking. The cleats are small and very slippery, so you have to watch your step. You'll also mark any flooring softer than steel. Our stripped wood floorboards have never been the same.

    f
     
  5. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    as long as you walk carefully, and you will, I find them ok on floors, wood floorboards perhaps not so much
     
  6. There used to be a single-sided road version SPD system which was 100% compatible with standard double sided off road SPD. The only difference in the cleats was a pair of 'pontoons' mounted to a plate which bolted under the cleat, lifting it off the ground and stabilising the shoe.
     
  7. Shimano SPD Road cleats, SH 70 (fixed) or SH 71 (floating)
     
  8. Woops, they still make em.
     
  9. MartinC

    MartinC Über Member

    Location:
    Cheltenham
    Don't worry about the cleats wearing out - they're durable and cheap. Do worry about how slippy the shoes will be for walking and engaing with the pedal. I once put some spd cleats on smooth soled road shoes to use with A515 single sided pedals. Trying to pick the pedal up after starting off was interesting to say the least. Unless you line it up right first time the shoe slips off the pedal, if the pedal's up side down then it's a comedy act. One ride and they went in the bin. I have a simple rule now - SPD's on shoes with tread that I want to walk in and Look's on racing shoes.
     
  10. Fnaar

    Fnaar Smutmaster General

    Location:
    Thumberland
    They'll be great for tap dancing! :biggrin:
     
  11. Nick1979

    Nick1979 New Member

    Location:
    London (SW11)
    Thanks guys for your suggestions.

    I tried for a few days and the results are mixed. Pedalling is much more efficient with the rigid sole and the shoes are much lighter and comfortable than my bulky Adidas MTB ones.
    But I have to agree with Martin, clipping in is much more difficult and if (when!) you miss the engagement, the foot slide on the pedal and it can be a bit scary (I had a few near 'moments'!). Like a lot of things in cycling, it gets better after a few days though, and I'm now quite confident clipping in on the first try.

    So Martin, are Looks easier to get in than SPD (on road shoes)? I was a bit worried about road cleats being more difficult to clip in (I often ride on busy London road so have to clip in/out all the time).
     
  12. MartinC

    MartinC Über Member

    Location:
    Cheltenham
    Nick. In my experience, with smooth soled road shoes, Looks are easier because the cleat/pedal is much larger and engagement doesn't need to be so precise. Double sided pedals make it easier with SPD's. SPD's with shoes with some sort of tread are a safe option because even if your foot doesn't engage first time you don't slip off the pedal.