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SS Disc Hubs

Discussion in 'Fixed Gear and Single Speed' started by EasyPeez, 31 Oct 2017.

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  1. EasyPeez

    EasyPeez Über Member

    Just having a browse at components with an eye on a possible wheel build for my single speed disc brake bike next year, and wondered what people riding similar use and would recommend. The bike will mainly be used for commuting so good bearings, general durability and ease of maintenance are my priorities, a bit of bling would be nice for when I get the bike out at a weekend, if it fits in my price range (prob around £300-400 total for the build).

    Common sense suggests a flip-flop hub would be incompatible with disc brakes, so is it fair to assume the only way to have fixed and SS options with disc brakes is 2 wheelsets?

    Also, not that weight is a major issue, but the SS hubs I'm looking at that list weights seem quite hefty, even in comparison to the not exactly ultra lightweight Hope RS4 hubs on my road bike (e.g Hope Pro 4 Trial rear hub is nearly double the weight, Chris Kings ISO - not that I'd be splashing that much - are 100g heavier) - are SS hubs generally heavier, and if so why is this?

    Cheers,

    Andy
     
  2. Threevok

    Threevok Über Member

    Location:
    South Wales
    The Hope one is heavier, because of all the gubbings (spacers) they add to be the same width as a normal hub, and to center the hub more, due to the difference in the dishing. Despite this (as far as I know) it's basically the same hub as a normal 135mm Pro 4

    I didn't bother with the single speed specific one myself. You have to use spacers anyway, so just I used the normal one with my own spacers

    Unless you are bothered with the dishing of the wheel, I see little point
     
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  3. Yellow Saddle

    Yellow Saddle Veteran

    Location:
    Loch side.
    Here's rule number one of acquiring good wheels.

    Whenever you are inquiring about finding lightweight wheel components you should know that you are not acting in your best interest.

    Here's rule number two.

    Lightweight wheels are always inferior to wheels designed for durability, reliability, standardisation and low cost of ownership.

    Here's rule number three.

    Even the colour of the components is more important than weight.

    Rule number four.

    Only drug dealers care about grams.

    Now, why are SS hubs heavier? Mostly because they have hefty thick solid steel axles and bolts holding them in place. Secondly, if they are of teh Hope type that uses a shortened cassette-type freehub, the freehub body is made from stainless steel rather than aluminium.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    EasyPeez

    EasyPeez Über Member

    Thanks for the explanation. You'll note that weight wasn't one of my priorities for the hub, I was merely surprised to see what I thought to be more of less the same hub weighing twice the amount in single speed guise, when I had naivley assumed single speed hubs would be broadly similar in construction.

    Would you concur with @Threevok 's point or do you consider the wheel dishing to be important enough to make a single speed hub worth using?
     
  5. Yellow Saddle

    Yellow Saddle Veteran

    Location:
    Loch side.
    Wheel dishing is totally irrelevant on bikes other than BMXs. Billions of dished bikes have been built and used up and dishing is still a non-issue. Your decisions should therefore not hinge on dishing.
    There are good reasons to avoid hubs that accept screw-on sprockets and hubs that accept splined sprockets are much better. If you are going to use spacers with standard thin steel sprockets, better get one with steel splines. I like the Hope hub for this application because it has a sensible freehub body, it can accept up to three sprockets so you can fiddle with gearing if you so wish and, it can be converted back into a standard multi-sprocket setup later on when the fad fades.
     
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  6. Sharky

    Sharky Veteran

    Location:
    Kent
    With fixed, you dont need a rear brake, so maybe you could just flip the wheel?

    But need to check your hub width. most flip flops are 120's.
     
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  7. Threevok

    Threevok Über Member

    Location:
    South Wales
    Indeed, and is exactly why I decided to use a normal Pro-4 hub with a steel freewheel.

    Besides, what's the point of having a bike that can be converted easily from SS to geared, if the rear hub can't ?

    BTW : the reason I mentioned dishing was because of a blinding argument (that may still be going on AFAIK) on one of the U.S single-speed forums, on that very subject.

    I suppose if you are Danny Mcaskilk you may care about such things
     
  8. Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    I can't help with wheels, but I do suggest you have a bike with a brake on both of them.

    Front only is legal, sure, but if you are involved in a crash what officialdom wants to see is a well-maintained bicycle with two brakes - it just gets you off on the right foot if there's blame to be apportioned.

    Might not matter for weekend only use, but this bike is going to be a commuter, used in a town, day in, day out.

    Northing to stop you having a disc on the front and a rim brake on the back.
     
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  9. OP
    OP
    EasyPeez

    EasyPeez Über Member

    Yeah, taking off the rear brake was never in my thoughts; I'm happy to stick with single speed for the forseeable. Simplicity of maintenance was my main reason for getting the bike as a winter commuter. Having the option to try fixed now and again would have been interesting, but I'm happy to leave that for now. I might pick up a secondhand fixed gear wheel at some point in the future if I see one at a reasonable price. If that does happen I'll ride without a rear brake but only on the odd quiet weekend ride in the countryside or the new cycle circuit in Hull.

    Out of interest, do you know how many spacers you have on? And what brand of rear sprocket do you favour?
     
  10. Threevok

    Threevok Über Member

    Location:
    South Wales
    I bought a set of spacers from VeloSolo ( I needed Gold but they do all sorts of colours). They are all different sizes, which helps getting the correct chainline.

    I have quite a collection of sprockets (from 12-21 teeth) all are Gusset SS, except the 15 (Shimano) and 21 (Surley)

    The Gussets are cheap as chips, but the higher you go (past 18t) they get expensive

    Here's a pic set up for 30/21 ratio, showing the spacers etc.

    IMG_3199.JPG


    If you are going down this route, use a steel freewheel, not alloy as sprockets can gouge the hell out of them

    You will also need a 12t lockring.

    All here http://www.velosolo.co.uk/shopsingle.html although other shops are available
     
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  11. OP
    OP
    EasyPeez

    EasyPeez Über Member

    I can't tell from the pic but I assume you have some spacers on the inside between sprocket and hub as well as the ones I can see? And re: correct chainline, would this be as straight as possible, and just something you judge by eye and feel rather than tool?

    Wow - some big hills where you live?!

    I didn't realise you could get that range. I was looking at some the other day and they seemed to start at 16t upwards. Good to know.

    Sorry for all the naive questions - I'm confused about what a freewheel is now - do you mean freehub? As in get a hub with a steel splined freehub such as the Hope Pro4?
    I was recommended White Industries sprockets by someone else, but I see WI also call them freewheels...They are also a heck of a lot more expensive than the Gusset sprockets! Are the two significantly different in some way?
    http://www.whiteind.com/new-page/

    Thanks.
     
  12. Threevok

    Threevok Über Member

    Location:
    South Wales
    Yes, there are spacers on the inside as well as the outside. If you look at the pictures at the link I gave you, they illustrate it better

    As for Chainline - there are some rather expensive tools (some worth more than the bike) to get it bang on. However, doing it by eye - or a straight edge - like a rule between the Sprocket and the chainring (before installing the chain) will suffice.

    Don't let that fool you. The bike is currently setup (30/21) for hill climbing in muddy conditions. Normal MTB I usually use between 32/18 and 32/16. For summer commutes on this bike I use 34/14

    IMG_3016.JPG

    The ones that fit onto existing Shimano freehubs are indeed cheap, long lasting and widely available - up to 18t. After that you start paying through the nose. I think I paid just over £20 for the Surly 21t one


    Yes, sorry I meant freehub - and yes, just like the ones you get on the Pro4. Make sure you get the correct splined one though. Shimano sprockets won't fit on SRAM Freehubs and vica versa


    These are a different kettle of fish. These are freewheels and sprockets all rolled into one (Like you get on a BMX) and screw directly onto a compatible hub. They will not fit onto conventional Hope hubs with freehubs. It can also be very expensive if you intend to change the rear ratio quite a lot.

    Please note that everything I have said is regarding my own MTB setup. Ratios for road bikes can be very different, although the principle is much the same.

    There's a good FAQ here

    http://velosolo.co.uk/faq.html
     
    Last edited: 2 Nov 2017
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  13. Dan B

    Dan B Señor Member

    Location:
    London
    Rear brake is occasionally even useful - for example, when you want (or need) to slow down while signalling to turn right.
     
  14. Sharky

    Sharky Veteran

    Location:
    Kent
    The convention for fixed bikes with just a single front brake is, or used to be, is to have the lever on the left for the very reason you mention.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    EasyPeez

    EasyPeez Über Member

    Thanks for all your help. Feel much more confident going forward now. Cheers.
     
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