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Surly Straggler

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by confusedcyclist, 28 Nov 2017.

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  1. ozboz

    ozboz Über Member

    Location:
    Richmond ,Surrey
    image.jpeg I have a Cross Check , there have been a few disappointments with it , some down to shop I bought it off , and I couldn't get on with the bar end shifters so I put a flat bar and MTB shifters , much better now , it is a comfy ride and according to Surley it should be capable to load it up to 170 Kgs , inc me , so hopefully get some touring in !
     
    confusedcyclist and Thorn Sherpa like this.
  2. OP
    OP
    confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    @fossala, once I've cleaned it up, I'll possibly stick it on the bay and on our classified forum here. It will likely be collection only and I'm a long ways from you in West Yorkshire!
     
  3. OP
    OP
    confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    26756877_10159715066340184_7762556164968379260_o.jpg
    26238991_10159715098305184_6017664038433316263_n.jpg
    26733767_10159715097595184_1356492944701264684_n.jpg

    Here she is. Her new wheels are not yet ready, I ended up ordering a dynamo hub from South Korea by accident (didn't realise it was international company!) so I'll have to wait a bit longer for delivery.

    I've since fitted a Tubus Logo rack, and am waiting for an ebay merchant to deliver some p-clips for rear mudguards to mount to the rack, the braze on's positions make it impossible to mount the mudguard stays with the rack on, the stays were not long enough. Bit of a faff, but I think it will still look ok. Looking at other Surly Stragglers online , you don't often see both a rack and mudguards fitted to this frame without creative adaptations. I needed the Tubus Logo foot extension kit, plus spacers to prevent the disc caliper from rubbing and being restricted by the rack mounting arm.

    The saddle bag will be coming off, and I'll be fitting my dynamo lights front and rear, these clip on's were just for a test night ride. For the eagle eyed, yes that's electrical tape wrapped around the headtube. I need to get some helicopter tape to protect the frame from cable abrasion, I learnt the hard way with my last surly frame that cables don't play nice with the pain jobs. Anyone know any better solutions?

    First impressions of the ride: MUCH more comfortable. The DT by comparison looks slammed. :rolleyes: Can't wait to get back to the regular commute, I've been going nuts in the car. :banghead:
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: 15 Jan 2018
    Jenkins, Liz Su, Elybazza61 and 3 others like this.
  4. ozboz

    ozboz Über Member

    Location:
    Richmond ,Surrey
    Nice !!
    What is that bracket on the down tube , below the water bottle ?
     
  5. OP
    OP
    confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    It's a lezyne mini pump and bracket.
     
  6. Crankarm

    Crankarm Guru

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    Bar end shifters are so last century and frankly dangerous. I have never ever understood the fascination with them. Downtube shifters were bad enough which were thankfully consigned to the design waste bin when STI levers and rapid fire handle bar shifters came in. You need all the bike controls together - brakes, gear shift and steering. It is so much safer.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    There's some warped logic here, but I admit bar ends require slightly more skill with balance and anticipating the road ahead. I briefly considered fitting a Tiagra STI groupset to this build, but in the end I calculated it would cost me upward of £400 for the upgrade as I would have to swap 2x BB7 MTB callipers to the road type as the pull differs, these are expensive. I stuck with the bar ends, 1. because they didn't cost me a penny more, 2. they can be set to friction, so no derailleur gaffs, or poor shifting, 3. maintenance is a breeze, and they cost a fraction of the low end STI levers when they eventually wear out.

    As for dangerous, in practice you won't often find yourself changing gears and braking at the same time, if you are, it's either because you are not observing and planning ahead accordingly, or something unexpected happened. If a car is driven erratically in your presence, you could argue that an emergency stop with STIs don't make you any less likely to be in the wrong gear. In any case, you'll only ever have the palm of your hand, or a finger or two on the levers, and the other hand over the opposite brake whilst the shifting hand steadies the bars, shifting need not take up all your hand. I have never considered them dangerous, and for the sake of simplicity, they are still worth considering. In a year of riding on the harried roads of Bradford (surly the worst in the uk!) haven't yet lost control due to the style of shiting. If anything, I might argue STI levers encourage a degree of reckless abandon as the rider relies less on anticipating the road ahead, the choice between all shifting options, downtube included simply comes down to preference, not safety.
     
    Last edited: 22 Jan 2018
    gaijintendo likes this.
  8. GrumpyGregry

    GrumpyGregry non-contributing ex-member


    Bar-end shifters aren't dangerous, you've not a shred of evidence to support that statement.
     
    Nibor likes this.
  9. ozboz

    ozboz Über Member

    Location:
    Richmond ,Surrey
    Each to their own , I am enjoying riding my CC much more now I've changed bars and shifters , I feel I have much more control especially in off road conditions ,
     
  10. Crankarm

    Crankarm Guru

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    Do you happen to have a bike with bar end shifters? I have ridden a couple in the last month. This is an experience I care not to repeat.
     
    ozboz likes this.
  11. GrumpyGregry

    GrumpyGregry non-contributing ex-member

    So you've tried to ride a couple of drop bar bikes with bar end shifters recently, not got on with them, and as a result you consider they are "frankly dangerous".

    So if I came from a flat bar bike background and rode a couple of drop bar bikes with brifters for a bit, didn't get on with them, would it be reasonable to come on here and say that brifters are frankly dangerous?

    Of course not.

    I have flat bars with gripshift, flat bar bikes with trigger shifters, drop bar bikes with brifters from Shimano, SRAM and Campagnolo, drop bar bikes with bar end shifters. Drop bar and flat bar bikes with no shifters at all. All shifters have pro's and con's. All of them. None of them are dangerous once the rider has adapted to them.
     
    confusedcyclist and tribanjules like this.
  12. Crankarm

    Crankarm Guru

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    You've clearly got your own opinion and agenda as you own bikes with this set up and are resistant to accepting an objective opinion of some one with a different view. 'Am I going to lose sleep over it? Not in the slightest. You carry one riding your drop handle bar end shifter bikes and I shall not. But please do me the courtesy of explaining one thing. How do you change gear with this set up WITHOUT taking one hand off the bars? Could this set up indeed be hazardous/dangerous riding on uneven surfaces where you needed both hands to steer and control your bike especially around hazards or even perform an emergency stop? How can you perform an effective emergency stop with just one brake typically the rear if your other right hand is off the bars fiddling with the right hand gear shifter which is nowhere near the front brake? If it is raining you would not likely be able to stop at all if your bike has rim brakes as well, cashing into whatever you should be trying to avoid. Explain this. Very hazardous wouldn't you agree?
     
    Last edited: 27 Jan 2018
  13. woodenspoons

    woodenspoons Senior Member

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    This is all just rubbish. I’ve been running touring and racing bikes with bar ends all my adult life, and have yet to crash because I can’t brake or change gear. I run a road bike with sti set up, so I can compare.
    Why are you so angry? Just relax and let other people get on with their bike. Don’t wade in telling us what you know from your very limited experience.
    This chap is posting about his bike, and all the attention he’s paid to getting it right for him. Respect that.
    Bar ends are reliable, low tech, fixable in the field and easy to fit and pay for. I’ve trashed three sets of Shimano STIs in fifteen years because they’re impossible to repair unless you are a very handy engineer with a lot of time and patience.
    Bar ends need brains and concentration to get just right. The rider has to work harder to see up ahead, and set up the gear a little earlier. Rear mech shifting is entirely possible with the back of the palm / heel of the hand while holding the drop. With, say, Dia Compe short reach levers for braking, and shallow drops, there’s very little distance required to move hand from shift to brake.
    But then I’ve got massively strong arms from drystone walling. Bar ends aren’t for pen pushers and desk jockeys.
     
    confusedcyclist likes this.
  14. Crankarm

    Crankarm Guru

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    Yadadadada .............. judging by your post you probably opposed or would oppose the mandatory wearing of car seat belts, the breathalyser, the driving test both for cars and motorbikes, motorcyclists wearing helmets, ban on smoking ..............
     
  15. Adrian

    Adrian Heed the elf's wisdom

    I take it you are opposed to giving other people the benefit of any hand signals, have never had to adjust zips, get something out of a pocket etc etc etc?