The bakers' thread

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by glasgowcyclist, 19 Dec 2017.

  1. bluenotebob

    bluenotebob Senior Member

    Location:
    France
    I've gone back through my notes to 2016 which was the last time I used the Easy-Bake Yeast. I used 2 teaspoons for a 500g loaf, if that helps.

    Incidentally, I don't think you need to add sugar with that yeast. But I did - and still do, now that I'm using French sachets of yeast. I'm making another 600g loaf today and I've used 2 x 5g sachets. Oh, and I've also added a dessertspoonful of molasses - which makes the bread smell even better, stains it slightly brown, and it tastes heavenly...
     
    benb likes this.
  2. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland

    Two teaspoons is the right amount for the ingredients you posted. I'm about to make a similar loaf (using 450g of spelt) and it calls for two teaspoons. You'll be fine with that.
     
    benb likes this.
  3. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Thanks, will update tomorrow.
    I suspect I've been leaving it to prove too long and/or knocking back too vigorously.
     
  4. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Fair enough - I go for the low yeast & long bulk ferment type breads.
     
    CarlP likes this.
  5. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Yeah, that'll be me.

    I tend to put only half a teaspoon in (4g typically), but as I mentioned in the post above, I use a 12 hour pre-ferment, and then however long it takes for the bulk ferment. - 8 to 10 hours at room temperature typically, or longer if I prove the dough in the fridge.

    You don't need much yeast to raise a loaf of bread - it just needs time - but too much yeast will give you a loaf that crumbles and tastes beery.
     
  6. SteveF

    SteveF Über Member

    That reminds me, I let my sourdough starter go over the winter, will have to prep another soon.
     
    Reynard likes this.
  7. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Might be worth keeping some in the freezer / drying some. Makes it much easier to seed a new culture.
     
    SteveF likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland

    How'd it go?
     
  9. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Miles better.
    I let it prove for about 30-40 minutes and it seemed ready, as per the finger test. Previously I'd been leaving it for an hour or more.
    Then instead of knocking back in the mixer for 30 seconds which I had been doing, I just gently shaped it into a rugby ball and placed into the tin. I didn't squash it in too firmly. Rose much better, and tastes amazing.

    IMG_20190312_203257.jpg
    IMG_20190313_075811.jpg
     
    Hugh Manatee, C R, CarlP and 8 others like this.
  10. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland

    Woohoo!

    That looks fab. :bravo:
     
  11. SteveF

    SteveF Über Member

    Nice looking loaf that...
     
  12. benb

    benb Evidence based cyclist

    Location:
    Epsom
    Thanks. I didn't bother with a thermometer, nor the dish of water in the oven - just baked it for 30 mins at 200 and it looked fine.
    My oven is very consistent, so don't think I need to test the temperature.
     
    glasgowcyclist likes this.
  13. OP
    OP
    glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland
    The thermometer isn't to test the oven temperature but the bread temperature. Some doughs can look like they're ready on the outside but haven't fully baked on the inside, this is where I use the thermometer to check.

    Nine times out of ten the bread is done but there's been the odd time where it's needed another five minutes and would have been too doughy had I relied on appearance and not extended the bake.
     
    benb likes this.
  14. Reynard

    Reynard Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Made the banana loaf again. Added a teaspoon of cinnamon and some chopped pecans to the mix. Also lowered the oven temp to 160 (fan) - it did take an hour and 20 to bake this time, but it rose well and didn't burn. Might try this at 170C next time.

    That's breakfast sorted for tomorrow at any rate. :hungry:
     
    Katherine, C R, SteveF and 1 other person like this.
  15. C R

    C R Über Member

    Location:
    Worcester
    Sorry missed the updates yesterday. I use just under one teaspoon, but let it prove for quite a long time, though not as long as @Reynard, about four hours usually.
     
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