1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Tubeless - it's the way forward

Discussion in 'General Cycling Discussions' started by Pale Rider, 10 Jan 2018.

Tags:
  1. Pat "5mph"

    Pat "5mph" A kilogrammicaly challenged woman

    Location:
    Glasgow
    :smooch: :laugh:
    Soz, been really busy at work, carried on cycling though :hello:
     
  2. Milkfloat

    Milkfloat Veteran

    Location:
    Warwick
    Weight, comfort and still the risk of snakebites, plus slime rarely seems to work at high pressure.
     
    Pat "5mph" likes this.
  3. Pat "5mph"

    Pat "5mph" A kilogrammicaly challenged woman

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Ah, all right, then it's really only worth the expense on a lighter bike with skinnier tyres, say a road bike or a tourer with 25's/28's.
     
  4. Milkfloat

    Milkfloat Veteran

    Location:
    Warwick
    I guess that depends if you like being covered in slime or not.
     
    Pat "5mph" likes this.
  5. Pat "5mph"

    Pat "5mph" A kilogrammicaly challenged woman

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Well, according to the posts above, there is a chance you could end up covered in Stan sealant instead ^_^
     
  6. Milkfloat

    Milkfloat Veteran

    Location:
    Warwick
    Stans tastes nicer. :ohmy:

    Actually, for high pressure I would stay away from Stans, I use Orange Seal Endurance.
     
  7. Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    Pat "5mph" likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    Another couple of rides done and I reckon my Moto X balloon tyres do roll along a bit better without tubes.

    Or put another way, they roll well at lower pressure which has given me increased comfort.

    Reduced drag/increased comfort would be a big benefit on something like LEL.

    The Durano tyres you like should run OK tubeless.

    Schwalbe don't spec them as 'tubeless ready', but neither are my Moto Xs.

    Both tyres have a dense 67 threads per inch carcass, which means the sealant doesn't have much to do to make them air tight.

    Of more importance will be the rims, particularly how the tyre bead seals.

    My 'tubeless ready' rims have a flat ledge on both sides of the wheel well for the bead to seal on.
     
    Heltor Chasca likes this.
  9. Pedropete

    Pedropete Senior Member

    Location:
    West Sussex, UK
    Have run tubeless for >10yrs on cx, mtb and road bikes. As already recommended by others, a tubeless plug (worm) kit is essential as no sealant is foolproof. Also, CO2 is a no-no with tubeless as the sudden temp drop and flood of CO2 can do peculiar things to some sealant formulas, particularly Stan’s. Repair kit for tubeless should be the same as for tubed, just with the additional tubeless repair kit (which is tiny): tube, patches, tyre boot (still don’t get why people don’t carry them), lever/s and pump. Don’t bother with more sealant as if you need that then you’re likely past the point of needing to stick a backup tube in. Best sealants I’ve found are the Effetto cafe lets, Orange Sealant and more recently, Oko Magic Milk.
     
    mustang1 and screenman like this.
  10. OP
    OP
    Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    A so-called 'ghetto' fix.

    However, former mountain bike racer Steve Peat has put his name to a glitter sealant.

    Or 'nano platelets' if you believe the marketing spiel.

    https://peatys.co.uk/home/
     
  11. Littgull

    Littgull Über Member

    Can anyone advise how often you need to replace/top up the sealant in the tyre? How is it done and is it a quick and easy job?

    Presumably, an occasional 'shake' of the wheels should produce a 'sloshing' sound if the wheel is held close to the ear in a quiet environment and this will confirm the sealant is ready for action if 'punctures' strike. No sloshing sound equals solidified/redundant sealant?
    Thanks
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Pale Rider

    Pale Rider Guru

    I was told a top-up is required about once a year.

    The sealant in my tyres is fairly thick, so I don't think you can hear or feel it sloshing around.

    In any case, most of it will be smeared around the inside of the tyre.

    Topping up could in theory be done by injecting through the valve - after the core is removed.

    My man prefers to pop a short section of the bead of the tyre, have a look-see, and pour in any extra that's required.

    Which is a faff, but at least it can be done at a convenient time and in the warm and dry.
     
    Littgull likes this.
  13. screenman

    screenman Legendary Member

    Valve out, some sealant in an old pump (or poundland) one squirt and valve back in and pump up. For me about every six months.
     
    Littgull likes this.
  14. YukonBoy

    YukonBoy Veteran

    Location:
    Mars
    I usually check the sealant about once every four months. I prefer just popping off a bit of tyre.
     
    Littgull likes this.
  15. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    Mostly positive stories, I'm glad to see. I had some Hutchinson Sector 28mm tyres on some brand new Hunt wheels. Problematic to seal at first (Hunt installed them for me), but after I added some more Stans, they eventually kept about 80% of their pressure overnight.

    800 miles in and the rear tyre had a puncture that wouldn't seal, just Stans p1ssing out all over the place. Got home and tried to plug the tyre with a 'worm', that failed, I also tried to repair the tyre from the inside using a patch, that wouldn't stick well enough. Long story short, I'm not done completely with tubeless, but I have lost some confidence. For the time being I'm back to Michelin Pro4 Endurance 28mm with tubes, at least I'm well drilled at making any repairs trail side with a conventional set up.
     
    Littgull likes this.