Tubeless tyre advice

Gibbo9

Über Member
Hi All,
I have recently invested in a new bike which will be fitted with tubeless tyres. 2 questions really, are they really as difficult to fit onto the rims as they look (youtube) and what would you recommend for me to carry in my saddle bag? I currently carry 2 tubes, CO2, levers and repair kit with a multi tool. Anything specific I should carry in case I get a puncture?

If it is of relevance tyres are the Schwalbe pro 1TLE fitted to Zipp 303s wheelset.
 

PaulSB

Legendary Member
You should still carry a spare tube. A small pair of pliers in case the valve is tight as you'll need to remove it to install a tube. Yes, it can be difficult to fit a tubeless tyre especially if it's a wet day as the combination of rain and wet slime is a bit grim. :eek:

I would strongly recommend you carry a plug kit in case of a significant puncture. I used mine only yesterday. It took five minutes to fix.

Mine is a Dynaplug kit. Expensive but very worthwhile.

574444
 

T4tomo

Veteran
it may seem like a daft question (but I've never run tubeless- yet), but do you plug it from the outside, so what looks like the little brass bit sits just inside the tyre and it helps the rubber fluid to seal the hole, when just fluid alone isn't working?
 

rivers

How far can I go?
Location
Bristol
I carry a spare tube and a plug kit. With regards to whether or not a tubeless tyre is easy to fit, it depends on the tyre/rim combo. Some are easier than others
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
Certain wheel and tyre combinations are just difficult. Doesn't matter if they're tubed or tubeless when you find a bad pairing you'll know.

Example: Putting a Schwalbe CX Comp or a Panaracer Gravel king (30mm and 38mm respectively) on the same fulcrum wheel is pretty much the only time in years that I've required a tyre lever, other tyres on Mavic wheels slip on and off relatively effortlessly.
 
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Pale Rider

Legendary Member
it may seem like a daft question (but I've never run tubeless- yet), but do you plug it from the outside, so what looks like the little brass bit sits just inside the tyre and it helps the rubber fluid to seal the hole, when just fluid alone isn't working?
The Dynaplug kits looks to be a slightly different design than the more usual 'anchovy' kits, so called because they look like a slither of anchovy.

With those, you fold the anchovy in half over a tiny fork, and stuff the anchovy into the hole before withdrawing the fork, (hopefully) leaving the anchovy in place.

This kit, which I have, includes a little spike tool for reaming the hole first, if required, and some rubber solution.

The solution can be smeared over the anchovy before insertion, but is not usually needed - some kits don't supply any.

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Weldtite-T...oz4rQqQKU4RiIwS5Pg6Id877ez0mzzYaAmQdEALw_wcB#
 

Chislenko

Well-Known Member
There is a thinking that the harder it is to get on the easier it is to get it to pop just with a normal track pump.

Mine were horrendous to fit but popped just with the track pump.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
I carry spare innertube, small bottle of sealant with fine nossle to inject through valve(once removed). Some puncture repair plugs.

But to be honest its been such a long time that I've had to stop and repair.

All my repairs get done at home later, like big holes patched inside. If a tyre has big cut, I will put in a tube and add sealant to innertube-works well for protection but lose a bit of rolling comfort. Better than slinging tyre in bin
 
My tubeless tyres have been easy to fit; even when my fingers were cold and week from chemo. Certain combos of rims/tyres are reported to be hard though.
I carry a life line £3 tubeless repair kit and a pump at minimum but I usually carry a tube and tyre levers. Touch wood since realising the Finish line sealant was useless and switching back to Joes/Stans/Continental/Muc off I've never had to use the latter. I've used the lifeline kit once on my bike and once on a friends bike. I got circa 33 miles at a decent speed and IIRC he did a 21mins 10 miles TT which more than justified the £3 investment :okay:
 
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PaulSB

Legendary Member
it may seem like a daft question (but I've never run tubeless- yet), but do you plug it from the outside, so what looks like the little brass bit sits just inside the tyre and it helps the rubber fluid to seal the hole, when just fluid alone isn't working?
The brass tip is to push through the tyre. Once this is done one pulls the tool back leaving the rubbery plug in the tyre.

Very quick, very efficient.
 
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