Varifocal spectacles

Large

Duty idiot
Location
Leighton Buzzard
Hi folks - I'm sure this has been done many times in the past, but I'm going to ask anyway.

I'm in need of varifocal glasses and I don't want to spend a fortune on them in case they don't work for me.

So before I take the plunge, can anyone give me the benefits and drawbacks of varifocal lenses?

Thanks
 
You don't need to peer under or over your glasses when reading things or perch them on your head when fettling the bike. The sweet spot is smaller so you have to move your head slightly more but you get used to that very quickly.
 

Chromatic

Legendary Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Heres what i had to say when I got mine:
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/whos-got-varifocals-then.86274/post-1548423

I too like Crackle find I have to move my head a little when reading but it really is not a problem. As it says in the link above I'm pleased with them and found no problems at all getting used to them, in fact I can't recall there being any 'getting used to them' period at all. I had no problems from the off.

You'll be fine with them I reckon.
Just get some cherry and white tinted ones! (if you're the Large I think you are you'll understand that, if you're not, you won't)
 

Cubist

Still wavin'
Location
Ovver 'thill
I'm very pleased with mine. The sweet spot as described can be a bit fussy. Better to pay for premium rather than standard lenses which give a larger usable central area, and don't go for small lenses. I made that mistake last time round and found them a bit crap.

They are expensive, but worthwhile if you have a complex prescription.

They take a bit of getting used to... I was violently seasick when I woke up the morning after first wearing them, but not everyone suffers this.

One drawback is watching TV from a recliner. You need to tilt the glasses so you are watching through the right bit of the lense. You need to be very precise with how you hold a book or tablet to read.
 
One thing I considered and still am is getting vdu specific glasses, as that can be an awkward distance to focus on. The only thing that prevents me is I'm too lazy to continually swop glasses.
 

RWright

Veteran
Location
North Carolina
When I got mine my optician told me it took him several days to get used to his. I think it took me five minutes before I didn't even notice they were progressive lens.
 
OP
Large

Large

Duty idiot
Location
Leighton Buzzard
Heres what i had to say when I got mine:
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/whos-got-varifocals-then.86274/post-1548423

I too like Crackle find I have to move my head a little when reading but it really is not a problem. As it says in the link above I'm pleased with them and found no problems at all getting used to them, in fact I can't recall there being any 'getting used to them' period at all. I had no problems from the off.

You'll be fine with them I reckon.
Just get some cherry and white tinted ones! (if you're the Large I think you are you'll understand that, if you're not, you won't)
Surely you mean a cherry and white tinted monocle? ;-)
 

Shortmember

Bickerton Cyclocross Racing Team groupie
I've been wearing varifocals for the last two years and now I wouldn't go back to single lens specs. The advantages for me are that they provide good vision at near, middle and far distances without the hassle of carrying three pairs of glasses everywhere. The only drawback for me, at first, was getting used to descending stairs and steps safely, because the next few steps down were slightly blurred unless I tilted my head down and viewed them through the middle distance part of the lens.
 

Chromatic

Legendary Member
Location
Gloucestershire
Surely you mean a cherry and white tinted monocle? ;-)
Well, yes, but you'll only need a monocle if you're as one eyed as us!
 

Kestevan

Last of the Summer Winos
Location
Holmfirth.
As above, don't go for shallow frames, the bigger the lens the better.

Make sure the optician "properly" measures the centre points of your eyes, the first pair I had made me feel violently ill, and were unusable... all because the pupil distance was out slightly.

Now I'd never go back to single vision lenses - however I also find that the one distance I cant comfortably use them for is VDU work..... which is bit of a bummer as a programmer.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
I've been wearing varifocals for the last two years and now I wouldn't go back to single lens specs. The advantages for me are that they provide good vision at near, middle and far distances without the hassle of carrying three pairs of glasses everywhere. The only drawback for me, at first, was getting used to descending stairs and steps safely, because the next few steps down were slightly blurred unless I tilted my head down and viewed them through the middle distance part of the lens.
That is why I personally would never wear them. Calling at houses all day long I go up and down sets of steps of all shapes and sizes and it would only be a matter of time...
 

4F

Active member of Helmets Are Sh*t Lobby
Location
Suffolk.
I took the jump about 4 weeks ago and I am pleased to say for me they have been excellent and I wish I had done it years ago..... It took about 2 days to get used to them

I was like you and did not want to spend a fortune in case they did not work. Asda Opticians do varifocal in their budget frames for £ 40.00 and if they do not work for you after a month will change to single vision lenses free of charge.
I have just ordered another 2 sets there from the designer range which they are doing 2 for £ 100.00

Overall I have been very pleased with Asda opticians and have been using them for about 10 years now
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
I tried them and got them replaced with bi focal after finding them no good for me.
specsavers is free trial..
get a very good fitter too as that makes all the difference..ask for a senior fitter ,trust me on that with specsavers
 

T4tomo

Veteran
yes defo recommend them, but not for cycling in (nor driving) as your peripheral vision is poor. I have a pair of normal specs for that. but fr around the house / office and working on bikes DIY etc they take some beating.
 

T4tomo

Veteran
Normal lenses are better for driving and cycling, you can convince yourself all you like that they aren't but no how much you turn your head, you can only point your eyes at one thing at a time. You have better peripheral vision with normal lenses, which could save your/someone elses life at some point.
 
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